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Thread: Gardening.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    681

    Default Gardening.

    Well. I transferred my starts to the garden, this week, which got me to thinking about all things gardening.

    Veggies: Kale, Chard, Cabbage (nappa and green), anasazi beans, potatoes, zucchini, colored pop corn, carrots, cucumbers, radishes, turnips, onions, garlic, asparagus, and roma tomatoes.

    Orchard: Apples (gravenstein, honey crisp), asian pears, persimmons, hazel nuts, chestnuts, black walnuts, cherries, blue berries, grapes, elder berries, and blackthorn(new addition).

    Herbs: Rosemary, thyme, sage, camamile, cone flower, goldenrod, bergamont, horehound, mint, bee balm, lemon balm, dill, chives, savory, and fennel.

    Sounds like a lot, but we have an edible landscape.

    This year we are doing more fermented foods. I have been playing with sourdough this winter, as well as kefir, and yogurt. I think we want to do more with fermented foods as part of our food store. I saw some people talking about sour kraut. Anyone still doing that?
    7/4/1776 - 11/4/2020
    ~~~~RIP USA~~~~

  2. #2

    Default

    I make kraut every year. It's one of our staples. I need it for my gut.

    This year I only have my two big garden going. My kitchen garden has been relocated because we built a new house and my kitchen garden is now the field lines for our new septic system.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,993

    Default

    Still waiting for any danger of frost to pass, then do my planting.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Camo,
    Try Kefir. Not the crap you get in the stores. Go to a farmer's market and chat up some of the people and see if they have any you can try.
    Kefir has about 50+ beneficial micro organisms in it compared to the 3-5 of Kraut. The kefir done right, should taste like plain yogurt, but not as strong.

    We are also adding ketchup and pickle relish to our ferments.
    7/4/1776 - 11/4/2020
    ~~~~RIP USA~~~~

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sweet Tennessee
    Posts
    4,912

    Default

    You're fermenting ketchup and relish or you are putting them in your kraut?
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Fermenting them. Ketchup was originally a fermented food. Lactose fermentation took too long, so they use vinegar as a substitute. Same thing with pickle relish. We can it for later use, but during the summer and early fall, we eat the stuff with the live cultures. Give kefir a try. Even if you are lactose intolerant, the fermentation takes care of all of that.
    7/4/1776 - 11/4/2020
    ~~~~RIP USA~~~~

  7. #7

    Default

    CU, I make my own Kefir, because I bake my own bread 2 to 3 times a week. Can't remember the last time I actually bought bread. I do make ketchup from time to time but rarely use it so I don't keep much on hand. Mostly use it in stews, tomato basil soup and when I make meatloaf. ( Winter food group) Other than that, it's not something I consider a necessary condiment.

    I do make a lot of sweet fermented horseradish, pickle relish, BB-Q sauce, mayo and mustard. Those are our primary condiments.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    7

    Default

    I relocated to the south a couple years back and one of the pluses is year round gardening. But there are six growing seasons thru the year and different thingts grow well in each season. So food preservation is critical to span the seasonal changes. I dehydrate and can things to cover the gaps. Right now, picking lettuce, radishes, gold squash, cabbage and collards; making kraut, dehydrating collards. Next crops up will be snap beans, tomatoes, zucchini, and yellow squash; then okra, new potatoes, corn, dried beans and southern peas, and peanuts (canned boiled peanuts, mmmm); then it is time to plant for autumn, with another round of snap beans, tomatoes and adding carrots, onions & beets for overwintering; then winter crops: cabbages, broccoli, collards, kale (expecially after a frost when it is sweetest), cauliflower (winter types good to minus 15 degrees before being killed), and all the brassicas; and finally in Jan. the onions are planted, along with potatoes, and peas. Some things I relied on in zone 4 do not grow in zone 8 (rhubarb, bunch grapes, many apples) but other things thrive in zone 8 far better than zone 4 (melons, sweet potatoes, southern peas and muscadine grapes). So it is all "eating with the seasons" here, but something is always ready to be eaten in the garden.
    Last edited by kappydell; 05-20-2021 at 01:21 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Try moving rhubarb to a light shade area, and keep it's roots damper than you would in Zone 4.
    7/4/1776 - 11/4/2020
    ~~~~RIP USA~~~~

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