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Thread: Garden 2020

  1. #1
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    May 2011
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    Default Garden 2020

    This year was certainly a learning experience , even after nearly 45 years of gardening, given the weather extremes we experienced. Our spring was one of the wettest I can remember, a lot of late gardens, just too wet to work. Then the driest July and August in a long time.

    When I finally got my garden out, my green beans rotted, then the second planting rotted. Funny thing, I planted kidney beans and cornbeans at the sametime, and the yields were great.

    Tomatoes did great , while most people I talked to had a bad year for tomatoes. They started splitting and rotting as they ripened , but I didn't have that problem.
    Cabbage and broccoli were the best ever, in my raised beds. The cabbage and broccoli in the garden drowned.

    Peas were awesome, corn the best ever, cucumbers lasted about 2 weeks and died, parsnips and carrots in raised beds did awesome, squash in raised beds awesome, but didn't do anything on the ground.

    Peppers were really good, onions good , potatoes sucked. Most didn't even bloom , the ones that did were small .

    Lessons learned;

    Raised beds are the way to go. I got twice the yield from half the space. I will be building more this fall / spring.

    Rabbit crap is an excellent fertilizer. ( Rabbit meat is GOOOD eating too )

    Diatomaceous earth is the best organic bug killer on earth. And it is food grade.
    Last edited by bambam; 09-14-2020 at 10:19 PM.

  2. #2

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    I sure hate to hear about your garden getting drown and rotting. That stinks when that happens. For me, it's usually the other way around. Not enough rain but this year was good for my garden, rain wise. I like that, so I don't have to depend so much on the irrigation system.

    I only planted one garden this year. Didn't have the time to devote. We are in the process of building on new house on our property, drilling a second well and a larger septic system. That's taking up all my time. I am so far ahead on my canning and freeze drying that only planting this year in the small garden won't negatively affect us at all.

    All I planted this year were green beans, lots of varieties of lettuce, tomatoes, harvested lots of asparagus, fairy tail egg plants, onions, collards, okra and of course our berries and our fruit trees produced well. That was it for this year in just one of my gardens. My small kitchen garden is 100'x92'. We've had just enough rain. I have 55% shade cloth over my kitchen garden to protect them from this Texas heat and hotter than hell direct sunlight.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Bad year here too. My garden didn't do squat. Only a few thigs came up, then dried up. Planted corn, peas and green beans twice. No corn, no peas at all. Only about a third of the green beans came up, but didn't grow and do anything. I've always had great gardens, but this year...zilch! First time I've ever experienced this. Its been a screwed up summer. Had to babysit my grandson so daughter could work. She tried finding a childcare, but they all wanted the same thing she was making, so that was no good. So, it all fell on Pop. As I no longer have my Sandy to help I had no one to spell me. Its been both frustrating and rewarding at the same time. Grandson is moderately autistic, doesn't talk, but very intelligent. We've learned to communicate non verbally. And, honestly, he's just a great blessing and pleasure. And with schools being closed I have him most of the day five days a week. Schools are opening back up for special needs students the 28th of the month. So we'll see how that goes. God willing I'm here next summer maybe things will be more back to at least a facsimile of normal and I'll be able to get more done...depending on what edicts come from those morons in DC.

  4. #4

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    Damn guys! What happen to y'all? I'm so sorry. Here, I could have had my bounty had I not been so overwhelmed with this new house being built and prepping the property for it.

    That really stinks. Maybe it's time to consider a greenhouse?
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    East Tennessee
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    Bam and Beo your all's gardens sound like mine did last year. About all that turned out was a few tomatos to eat on and a good harvest of bell and japaleno peppers.
    This year, has been a learning experience too. I built a couple raised beds at the start of the shutdown. and made a few mistakes, mainly planting stuff way too close with some things. But over all best garden I've had in a few years. I was late getting my taters out, but they came up and grew off well and ZERO tater bugs. decent harvest. Lots of kidney and great northern beans, onions, maters, 4 kinds of peppers, okra, cukes, cabbage, snow peas, & still have parsnips to harvest. Mostly lost my watermelons to the deer and corn to the crows.
    I did install a drip irrigation system in my beds and the cukes, maters, and peppers. That stuff worked so well when we had a dry period of 4 or 5 weeks. Decided a couple months ago that there are gonna be more beds built this fall/winter. I want 4 to 6 more of them for next year. Found a new design too. This year I went with 2x12 stacked 2 deep. The way lumber prices have climbed, I've decided to build a 2x4 frame around the top and use metal roofing cut into 2' sections to contact the ground. Should last a lot longer than the 2x's will and cheaper right now as well
    Greater love hath no man than this, That a man lay down his life for a friend.
    John 15:13

  6. #6
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    May 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacpacker1513 View Post
    Bam and Beo your all's gardens sound like mine did last year. About all that turned out was a few tomatos to eat on and a good harvest of bell and japaleno peppers.
    This year, has been a learning experience too. I built a couple raised beds at the start of the shutdown. and made a few mistakes, mainly planting stuff way too close with some things. But over all best garden I've had in a few years. I was late getting my taters out, but they came up and grew off well and ZERO tater bugs. decent harvest. Lots of kidney and great northern beans, onions, maters, 4 kinds of peppers, okra, cukes, cabbage, snow peas, & still have parsnips to harvest. Mostly lost my watermelons to the deer and corn to the crows.
    I did install a drip irrigation system in my beds and the cukes, maters, and peppers. That stuff worked so well when we had a dry period of 4 or 5 weeks. Decided a couple months ago that there are gonna be more beds built this fall/winter. I want 4 to 6 more of them for next year. Found a new design too. This year I went with 2x12 stacked 2 deep. The way lumber prices have climbed, I've decided to build a 2x4 frame around the top and use metal roofing cut into 2' sections to contact the ground. Should last a lot longer than the 2x's will and cheaper right now as well
    Yep, raised beds are the way to go . I built 5 this year , each is 5 ' by 15 ' . I used old sheets of metal off of an old sawmill. Old heavy metal, should last out my grandkids if the world lasts that long . I'm going to build at least 3 more this fall or early spring.

    I solved my deer problem with an 8 foot game proof fence about 6 or 7 years ago. I just couldn't shoot enough deer to keep them out. Smart bastards figured out when I went to bed and came in late. Not one deer in the garden since I put up the high fence . Well worth the cost of the fence , and I cut all the locust and cedar posts myself, and did the work myself , saved a lot of money.

    Cammie , our weather is so unpredictable . Some years we have wet springs, dry summers, some years dry springs and wet summers. Last year it rained all spring and summer, I didn't water my garden a single time. Some years I water every week. The raised beds will help tremendously with that problem. I have a pond beside my garden , an old Briggs and Stratton water pump , about 50 years old, still purrs like a kitten , belonged to my dad . I pump pond water into the garden if it's dry. inch and a half hose soaks it good in little time. Our big problem here, next to the unpredictable weather, is the frost. Our last frost is usually mid-May , and first frost in the fall is around 1st of Oct. So growing season is fairly short. PLant too early, lose a lot and have to replant. Plant too late and last frost gets it .

    I really wish Eve would not have eaten that apple.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    East Tennessee
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    Bam, you should try some portable high tunnels for the beds. PVC and plastic sheeting would do wonders for frost protection. Thats my plan for next spring anyway. I didn't get anything planted for this fall.
    Greater love hath no man than this, That a man lay down his life for a friend.
    John 15:13

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacpacker1513 View Post
    Bam, you should try some portable high tunnels for the beds. PVC and plastic sheeting would do wonders for frost protection. Thats my plan for next spring anyway. I didn't get anything planted for this fall.
    I actually tried that this year with 20 mater plants . I started them indoors too early and had to get them out. I covered them with clear plastic , and the frost killed every one. Luckily I had more started , and I also bought some off the FFA kids, I always buy plants off them to support the kids. Ended up with more maters we could use and gave a bunch away.

    Lesson learned, don't trust plastic to save your plants in a heavy frost.

  9. #9

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    Those 25 gal cow lick buckets make great potato gardens. Most feed stores give them away just to get rid of them. I just drilled holes in the bottom and a few on the sides for good drainage. Fantastic potato harvest! I have collected about 100 of them. Great for zucchini and carrots too and the gophers can't get to the carrots. I tried tomatoes in them but they didn't do that well. Tomatoes need to be in the ground is my experience. I do have several raised beds for my green veggies like cabbage, spinach, lettuce and herbs.

    I won't have time for a Fall garden this year.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  10. #10
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    May 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    Those 25 gal cow lick buckets make great potato gardens. Most feed stores give them away just to get rid of them. I just drilled holes in the bottom and a few on the sides for good drainage. Fantastic potato harvest! I have collected about 100 of them. Great for zucchini and carrots too and the gophers can't get to the carrots. I tried tomatoes in them but they didn't do that well. Tomatoes need to be in the ground is my experience. I do have several raised beds for my green veggies like cabbage, spinach, lettuce and herbs.

    I won't have time for a Fall garden this year.
    I actually grow my tomatoes in old tires, stack them two high, fill with compost, one plant in each , put a piece of fish under the plant like the indians, they do great. I also plant some in the garden, ground level , but most years the ones in the tires do better.

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