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Thread: Fire Preparation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    545

    Default Fire Preparation

    I must apologize for being silent these last couple weeks. Lots of work to do. I completed building my compound several weeks ago and weas looking forward to doing nothing more than watering the garden, feeding the animals, trolling liberals and working on my hook at the church bowling league.

    Then Oregon started to burn and it got me to thinking.

    My barn is a basic wood structure that is clad in steel sheeting, and a steel roof. I have a workshop that I built from a tough-shed kit that I got on one of their sales, and my house.

    The barn is the most difficult to protect so I put soffets under the eves with a wire mesh attached to the metal roof and the metal siding. The mesh is supposed to allow air to flow through it, but resist embers. It was highly successful in Paradise, CA. Most of the houses that survived that fire had that mesh. Next, I have sprinklers on the outside of the building both on top of the roof and on the ground, spraying water around the building.

    My shop is pretty secure, and I only have sprinklers on the front and back panels, because they are wood clad in hardy board.

    The house is secure because it is concrete and steel construction, protected by steel sheeting lining the soffets and the steel trusses under the metal roof.

    I have been working on the compound the last couple weeks. I have cleared all greenery away from the house out to about 8 feet and replaced it with either concrete or crushed rock walkways. Everything is now soaked out to about 100 feet from the buildings and everything is Sheep mowed. I have cut down lots of trees to thin out the woods around the house, and the sheep have cleared the undergrowth away. There are no dead or stressed trees, no dead fall, no slash, no kindling on the ground, and I am slowly getting the wood split, and burning the unusable waste. I need a beer!

    Two days ago, the smoke got so bad, I could not go out side without a mask. They are starting to talk about containment on these fires, so things are looking up. They are also talking about how these fires were set. If they were set, there is no reason they shouldn't "flare up" again. I am ready. My irrigation pond is almost full again, and my cistern is protected.

    Protect yourselves. OH! BTW, Stihl 20" Chainsaw bought it in 1985, and still going strong.
    Last edited by Crazy Uncle; 09-14-2020 at 03:07 AM.
    "Strange how paranoia can link up with reality now and then." - Philip K. Dick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South East US
    Posts
    1,223

    Default

    I have plans in mind. Dug a small pond this summer and next summer gonna make it bigger and deeper. I have a artesian well that flows over 150 gallons a min. Use the well to feed the pond and then use a generator to run a water pump to feed a fire fighting system designed to cover all main building and a shelter area for the family. Itís not gonna happen quickly, but these fire have convinced me that it does need to happen. I am surrounded by timber lands on three sides. Thankfully I am in the middle of my property with 1.5 acres cleared around me. So that buffer would help as well. I have had this thought in the back of my mind the past two years while I have been planning and building. The wife thought it was silly till all these fires started this year.
    Vox Populi!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    5,082

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy Uncle View Post
    I must apologize for being silent these last couple weeks. Lots of work to do. I completed building my compound several weeks ago and weas looking forward to doing nothing more than watering the garden, feeding the animals, trolling liberals and working on my hook at the church bowling league.

    Then Oregon started to burn and it got me to thinking.

    My barn is a basic wood structure that is clad in steel sheeting, and a steel roof. I have a workshop that I built from a tough-shed kit that I got on one of their sales, and my house.

    The barn is the most difficult to protect so I put soffets under the eves with a wire mesh attached to the metal roof and the metal siding. The mesh is supposed to allow air to flow through it, but resist embers. It was highly successful in Paradise, CA. Most of the houses that survived that fire had that mesh. Next, I have sprinklers on the outside of the building both on top of the roof and on the ground, spraying water around the building.

    My shop is pretty secure, and I only have sprinklers on the front and back panels, because they are wood clad in hardy board.

    The house is secure because it is concrete and steel construction, protected by steel sheeting lining the soffets and the steel trusses under the metal roof.

    I have been working on the compound the last couple weeks. I have cleared all greenery away from the house out to about 8 feet and replaced it with either concrete or crushed rock walkways. Everything is now soaked out to about 100 feet from the buildings and everything is Sheep mowed. I have cut down lots of trees to thin out the woods around the house, and the sheep have cleared the undergrowth away. There are no dead or stressed trees, no dead fall, no slash, no kindling on the ground, and I am slowly getting the wood split, and burning the unusable waste. I need a beer!

    Two days ago, the smoke got so bad, I could not go out side without a mask. They are starting to talk about containment on these fires, so things are looking up. They are also talking about how these fires were set. If they were set, there is no reason they shouldn't "flare up" again. I am ready. My irrigation pond is almost full again, and my cistern is protected.

    Protect yourselves. OH! BTW, Stihl 20" Chainsaw bought it in 1985, and still going strong.
    Sounds like you've got a plan. James Hardie siding meets California wildfire standard for building materials. Your mileage may vary. I've seen it get red hot and not burn, obviously the framing behind it can burn, but at least it won't take a spark.
    Common sense is so uncommon nowadays it ought to be reclassified as a super power

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