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Thread: This is getting very serious!!!!!

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    Actually, that was me that said loud but small in numbers. There are literally 40 something idiots making all this noise in congress but the media misleads the country in believing they are in gross masses.

    Here's what I wondering. If the house idiots can't get the votes ( in the HOR ), what will they do to proceed with this coup? And what will the republican congress do to stop it? When is Durhams report going to shed the light needed to begin prosecution

    IMO, Nadler needs to be on top of that list after what he said about ousting Trump before the election. That is a stone cold threat to the president!!!

    Also, I'm going to predict that the Nov 2020 election polls are going to be inundated with liberal protesters much much worse than when Obama had his goons out in force with machine guns.. Ie; black panthers.
    Thanks, Cammi. I stand corrected. Yeah, I agree with you in that I too am wondering what their next ploy will be if/when this. To say these morons are getting desperate is a gross understatement. I can't think of any words sufficient to describe or define the depth and breadth of their panic. That's what worries me most. They're getting panicky enough to throw caution to the wind and do something really stupid and horrible. Nadler ( and a few others I could name), needs to steel about 50 pounds of logging chain and try to swim across the Potomac with it wrapped around them. They probably wouldn't sink even then. Shlt floats too easily.
    Last edited by beowulf; 12-12-2019 at 05:37 PM.

  2. #12

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    I can understand why Graham doesn't want a full trial. For 1, we have the votes to quash the impeachment, and 2, he doesn't want to give the Dems any more stage time. I'm thinking the senate is ready to open up a box of whoop-ass with the Durham/Barr report and that is the focus.

    The Dems would love nothing more than to make a circus out of the senate and Graham isn't going to let that happen.

    The senate will simple vote and that will be the end of this impeachment sham...from now until after the election, focus will be on the Democrat corruption. I LIKE IT!
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    I can understand why Graham doesn't want a full trial. For 1, we have the votes to quash the impeachment, and 2, he doesn't want to give the Dems any more stage time. I'm thinking the senate is ready to open up a box of whoop-ass with the Durham/Barr report and that is the focus.

    The Dems would love nothing more than to make a circus out of the senate and Graham isn't going to let that happen.

    The senate will simple vote and that will be the end of this impeachment sham...from now until after the election, focus will be on the Democrat corruption. I LIKE IT!
    I hope they bring a whooping stick about like the one Jo Don Baker (Buford Pusser) used in the movie "Walking Tall" to clean out that vipers' nest at the end of the movie.

  4. #14
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    As far as Graham goes, Cammi may be right. But I can't help remembering his stance on so many things, along with McCain, that were contrary to the good of this country. Deep State if you will. But once NoName was gone, Graham changes his colors for most the part. Could it be he has a bunch of skeletons in his closet he is afraid of being released if the Senate starts digging into Ukraine and other stuff very hard?
    Greater love hath no man than this, That a man lay down his life for a friend.
    John 15:13

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    I can understand why Graham doesn't want a full trial. For 1, we have the votes to quash the impeachment, and 2, he doesn't want to give the Dems any more stage time. I'm thinking the senate is ready to open up a box of whoop-ass with the Durham/Barr report and that is the focus.

    The Dems would love nothing more than to make a circus out of the senate and Graham isn't going to let that happen.

    The senate will simple vote and that will be the end of this impeachment sham...from now until after the election, focus will be on the Democrat corruption. I LIKE IT!
    Haven't considered the Barr/Durham idea.......I feel better.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacpacker1513 View Post
    As far as Graham goes, Cammi may be right. But I can't help remembering his stance on so many things, along with McCain, that were contrary to the good of this country. Deep State if you will. But once NoName was gone, Graham changes his colors for most the part. Could it be he has a bunch of skeletons in his closet he is afraid of being released if the Senate starts digging into Ukraine and other stuff very hard?
    I think a lot of repubs were compromised in some way, maybe framed, bribed, threatened in some way, but were freed when Pres. Trump won , Q had a post about that one time but I can't remember the exact words.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    I think a lot of repubs were compromised in some way, maybe framed, bribed, threatened in some way, but were freed when Pres. Trump won , Q had a post about that one time but I can't remember the exact words.
    Roberts is one for sure SC Chief Justice. I have no doubt there are others. But if the hammer comes down on the dems, you know it's going to on the r's as well. Anyone connected would be at risk of facing what they have over their heads.
    Greater love hath no man than this, That a man lay down his life for a friend.
    John 15:13

  8. #18

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    Well, I'm down for that. I don't care what party. The system needs drastic purging. There's dirt on both sides and all of them need to be seriously reprimanded and their titles ripped from them, along with thier pensions and serve some serious time behind bars and not a damn white collar country club prison. Whoever is leading this crap should be hung just like Saddam was. If it's not stopped abruptly, the next future of this country will be genocide.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  9. #19
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    very thoughtful article by Sharyl Attkisson (one of the few real reporters left) on why Barr / Durham seem to be taking eternity to do anything:
    she has also been the victim of goobermint spying and is suing them over 4th amendment rights
    she is pretty even handed and not prone to exaggeration, so this all makes sense to me.
    if you buy this argument then there is hope, but not until summer
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In each of two video appearances, on NBC News and at Wall Street Journal’s “CEO Council,” Attorney General William Barr provided the same basic information and views about the U.S. intelligence community’s actions against the Trump campaign in 2016 and 2017. A criminal investigation is underway and being led by U.S. Attorney John Durham.

    Barr was motivated to make the public statements, he said, by the misreporting and confusion surrounding Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s report issued on Dec. 9. It found serious government surveillance abuses but no evidence of political bias on the part of the offending FBI officials and agents.

    Below are 24 points Barr felt the need to make after the release of the Horowitz report. (All of the information is attributed to Barr.)

    1. Don’t expect Durham’s findings to be announced before late spring or summer 2020.
    2. The FBI did spy on the Trump campaign. That’s what electronic surveillance is.

    3. Regarding the FBI’s actions in surveilling Trump campaign associates, it was a “travesty” and there were “many abuses.”

    4. From “day one,” the FBI investigation generated exculpatory information (tending to point to the targets’ innocence) and nothing that corroborated Russia collusion.

    5. It’s a “big deal” to use U.S. law enforcement and intelligence resources to investigate the opposing political party, and I cannot think of another recent instance in which this happened.

    6. Evidence to start the FBI’s investigation into Trump associates was “flimsy” from the start and based on the idea that Trump aide George Papadopoulos expressed he may have had pre-knowledge of a Democrat National Committee computer hack. However, it was actually just an offhand barroom comment by a young campaign aide described merely as a “suggestion of a suggestion, a vague allusion” to the fact that the Russians may have something they can dump. But by that time, May 2016, there was already rampant speculation online and in political circles that the Russians had hacked Hillary Clinton’s emails in 2014 and that they might surface. So the idea that Papadopoulos’s comment showed pre-knowledge of the Democratic National Committee hack and dump “is a big stretch.”

    7. It was “wrong” for the FBI to presume the Trump campaign was part of a plot. They should have gone to the campaign and discussed their suspicions.

    8. The normal thing to do would be to tell the campaign that there could be attempted foreign interference. There is no legitimate explanation as to why the FBI didn’t do this. The FBI’s explanation for this was that they only do “defensive briefings” if they’re certain there’s no chance they’re tipping someone off. But this simply isn’t true, isn’t plausible, and doesn’t hold water because our intelligence officials and President Barack Obama repeatedly contacted the Russians, the guilty party, to tell them to “cut it out.”

    9. If the purpose were to protect the election, you would have given the Trump campaign a defensive briefing. You could have disrupted any foreign activity in time to protect the U.S. election.

    10. As to the FBI’s motive, “that’s why we have Durham.” I’m not saying the motivations were improper, but it’s premature to say they weren’t.

    11. The inspector general operates differently as an internal watchdog. Horowitz’s approach is to say that if people involved give reasonable explanations for what appears to be wrongdoing, and if he can’t find documentary or testimonial evidence to the contrary, he accepts it.

    12. Contrary to much reporting, Horowitz didn’t rule out improper motive; he didn’t find documentary or testimonial evidence of improper motive. Those are two different things.

    13. Instead of talking to the Trump campaign, the FBI secretly “wired up” sources and had them talk to four people affiliated with the Trump campaign, in August, September, and October 2016.

    14. All of the information from this surveillance came back exculpatory regarding any supposed relationship to Russia and specific facts. But the FBI didn’t inform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance court, which approved wiretaps against former Trump campaign volunteer Carter Page four times.

    15. At one point early on, the FBI didn’t have enough probable cause for a wiretap warrant, so it took the “Steele dossier” information against Trump, “which they’d done nothing to verify,” and used that to get the wiretaps.

    16. The wiretaps allowed the FBI to go back and capture Page’s communications, emails, and other material from weeks, months, and even years ago.

    17. Should the four FBI applications to wiretap Trump campaign aide Carter Page have ever been made, considering there were 17 critical omissions or errors by the FBI making it appear they had better evidence than they had? This is the meat of the issue, and “if you spend time to look at what happened, you’d be appalled.”

    18. The FBI withheld from the court all of the exculpatory information and the lack of reliability of the main FBI source, Christopher Steele, who was being paid by the Democratic National Committee and the Hillary Clinton campaign to find evidence connecting Trump to Russia.

    19. The major takeaway is that after the election in January, the FBI finally talked to one of Steele’s important sources to try to verify some of the “dossier” information and sourcing, as they’re required to do. This Steele source told the FBI he didn’t know what Steele was talking about in the dossier, and that he’d told Steele that the information he’d provided was “supposition” and “theory.” At that point, “it was clear the dossier was a sham.” Yet the FBI didn’t tell the court, and continued to get wiretaps based on the dossier.

    20. Further, the FBI falsely told the court that Steele’s source had been proven reliable and truthful. In fact, what the source had told the truth about was that “the dossier was garbage.” It’s hard to look at this “and not think it was gross abuse.”

    21. Were the four Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act judges who approved the four wiretaps against Trump associate Carter Page badly misled by the FBI? Yes.

    22. Are people going to be held accountable, including at the very top of our intelligence agencies and FBI? Well, they’re all gone.

    23. The whole Russia collusion hype was a “bogus narrative hyped by an irresponsible press” that proved entirely false in the end.
    Are former FBI Director James Comey and former FBI official Andy McCabe and others implicated in the Durham investigation? I think there was a failure of leadership in that group. Quoting the inspector general, the explanations he received “were not satisfactory. You can draw your own conclusions.”

    24. Why haven’t we already thrown people in prison? “These things take time.” The government has to have proof beyond a reasonable doubt before we indict; it’s a substantial hurdle. Nobody is going to be indicted and go to jail unless that standard is met.
    In his interviews this week, Barr provided a treasure trove of information about what stands to be one of the most important investigations into our U.S. intelligence community of our time. His signposts indicate that we can expect a shakeup of a system that may have been broken for decades.

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