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Thread: As if we didn't have enough to worry about.

  1. #1

    Default As if we didn't have enough to worry about.

    I ran across this article. I am working on a degree in Geology. I am most interested in the mineralogy of reactance zones. Gem stones. Shiny rocks. However I do keep a weather eye on Yellowstone and other areas, because reactance zones are located VERY close to tectonic boundarys both past and present as well as volcanoes.

    Check out this link. They are talking about a very recent earthquake swarm in Yellowstone, where harmonic quakes are swarming along the Southeastern portion of Yellowstone Lake.

    https://elizabethprata.blogspot.com/2009/01/more-on-yellowstone-harmonic-tremors.html

    I am looking for the raw data on the UofU website, but that is spread out and there is no interpretation on what the data represents. What data I have found matches what she has in her blog.
    Last edited by GR82BPREPD; 09-13-2019 at 02:36 AM.
    We learn from history that we do not learn from history. Georg Wilhelm F. Hegel

  2. #2
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    2009 article. This is 2019, and it hasn't blown. There has been more activity, though, but whether that means anything is anyone's guess. Biggest danger is an eruption without warning, which is certainly possible given Yellowstone's geological makeup.

  3. #3

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    Yes I know the article was from 2009. Apologies. I was not clear. I do that sometimes where I think WAY faster than I type.

    The data I was looking at was from March 2019. Deep earthquake swarms as well as shallow earthquake swarms. 127 in total. The last earthquakes in that cluster were a mixture of asymmetric and harmonic. The article even though from 2009, describes earthquake patterns in that region very well. I am still crawling through the tilt and deformation data, but so far that doesn't show anything but normal expansion and deflation that has occurred there since they collected data.

    Any vulcanologists out there? This stuff is really interesting, but takes a while to go through and interpret.
    We learn from history that we do not learn from history. Georg Wilhelm F. Hegel

  4. #4

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    Hmmmm... Double post. How did that happen?
    We learn from history that we do not learn from history. Georg Wilhelm F. Hegel

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    if you were around for Mt St. Helen - you get a small idea of the effects of a domestic volcano - and then studying the Euro volcanos and the major effects they caused >>>> hope I'm not around if Yellowstone goes - going to be a real bitch to work around ....

  6. #6

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    I'm no volcanologist, but I was always taught that those harmonics and swarms were a good sign that eruptions would be minimal, being gases are systematically released in small increments to releave mass pressure, reducing the possibilities of a major eruption. Has that analysis been revised?
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illini Warrior View Post
    if you were around for Mt St. Helen - you get a small idea of the effects of a domestic volcano - and then studying the Euro volcanos and the major effects they caused >>>> hope I'm not around if Yellowstone goes - going to be a real bitch to work around ....
    I remember Mount St Helens. I was reading about Mt Pinatubo in the Philippines in August, 1991. The article said it was ten times the force of Mount St. Helens. It almost obliterated Clark Air Base. Clark was never reopened after that. I saw some pictures of what Clark looked like after the eruption. Damage was just unbelievable. I remember what Clark looked like when I was there in 1965-66. It was a beautiful place. The pictures of what it looked like after Pinatubo blew its top just broke my heart. I have a lot of fond memories from my time at Clark. We called Pinatubo Huk Mountain. I never did learn exactly why. Something to do with a CT (Communist terrorist) group I can't pronounce or spell. The name was about a foot long and looked like someone scrambled the alphabet. We just called them Huks for short. The Philippine Army was always having skirmishes with them outside the base perimeter.
    Last edited by beowulf; 09-14-2019 at 11:27 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    I'm no volcanologist, but I was always taught that those harmonics and swarms were a good sign that eruptions would be minimal, being gases are systematically released in small increments to releave mass pressure, reducing the possibilities of a major eruption. Has that analysis been revised?
    A big problematic area. Yes .... those quakes/harmonics may mean pressure is being released, but ....
    .....it could ALSO mean pressure is building up.
    A lot of work has been done in the past few decades to figure out specifics .... the nature of the geological movements; are they vertical ...or horizontal? What does it mean, given the formation below ground?
    All with the hope of predicting when the next geologic event will be. San Andreas fault brings quakes. Yellowstone will be a volcanic eruption.
    As of now, we cannot predict anything very well.

  9. #9
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    From what I understand, the thing to keep your eye on is "land movement." Rapidly rising land could signal an eruption is coming shortly.

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    I'll never complete, but have been stagnant at about 85 hours toward an Earth Science degree, I had not declared but was wanting Geology. A favorite prof on mine was Indian and basically a retired volcanologist. His favorite quote was, "There are old volcanologist, and there are bold volcanologist, but there are no old, bold volcanologist."
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


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