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Thread: Knots - for Survival

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Default Knots - for Survival

    So, I've always been into knots....probably as a result of Boy Scout training or my construction jobs since age 16....

    But I was never very good at many of them, except the ones I used a lot, like the truckers hitch to tie stuff down. Whenever I was out in the wilderness and need another knot, I would usually forget it when I needed it.

    So I decided a while back to identify the 10 most useful knots for Survival, and I practice them at least once a week....amazing, practice actually does make perfect, or as close as I'll get...:-)
    So here's my list of the top 10 (based a lot on surfing Youtube)

    Comments? Care to add any? Any you think are not useful? I avoided too many nautical knots, stuck to the ones that I thought would be more useful to survival only.

    1) Trucker's Hitch (for tie down and tightening loads)
    2) Bowline (Ultimate tie up knot for horses, boats etc...)
    3) Daisy chain (For tying up extension cords and long ropes)
    4) Square knot
    5) Clove Hitch (tie a rope to a handle or post etc)
    6) Figure 8 (tie down)
    7) Prusik ( for tying a rope to a main line rope like making a tent shelter)
    Round plus 2 half hitches
    9) Sheet bend (joins two ropes, particularly of different sizes)
    10) Taut Line ( good for a tent lashing, adjustable)

    *Honorable Mention - Anchor Bend (couldn't make my top 10 but should've)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Sweet Tennessee
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    Sometime with an actual computer should show pictures of each of these knots. I'm pretty sure I know these, but knot 100% sure.
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  3. #3
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    There is a great app called 'Best Knots By Galaxypoint.com'

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    I was into knots pretty heavily when I was growing up...knots on my hard head from rough and tumble with my brother and cousins, baseball, football, corn cob "wars"...you name it we probably did it. Too many of them done gone across the great divide now, but the memories sure do bring back the good times of yesteryear.
    Last edited by beowulf; 07-26-2018 at 09:53 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Used lotsa different knots on a drilling rig back in the day. Bowline for sure the most popular because as heavy as the load may be, it will always come out. We used a cathead and catline back in the day, hands now wouldn't know what it is if you showed them a picture. Tying rope to cable to chain in any combination can be tricky. My safety belt had a bowline tying belt to rope, and then 8 wraps and a half hitch tied off line to derrick board rail.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  6. #6
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    Good medicine in bad places

  7. #7
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    Nov 2009
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    Great thread. Thanks for bringing it up.
    When I was a scout we learned a bunch of knots. but like most things, if you fail to keep using stuff it tends to go away.
    Greater love hath no man than this, That a man lay down his life for a friend.
    John 15:13

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Had a friend many years ago was a merchant marine. I guess they don't have much to do at sea, so he/they tie knots and such.This guy was on shore visiting his brother, the friend of mine so we went out skiing one day. He whipped up a monkeys fist around a rock in about 5 minutes, and plaited the loose end back into the rope in about 10 minutes. I used that think for many years throwing lines to dock, or other boats, and such.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Fidel,

    Thanks for that link. I like many have forgotten much of what we learned while with the Scouts, on the ranch or who were lucky enough to have a very patient grandpa who felt the need to teach a cocky little 10 year old how not to die a mile from home. Thanks again for sharing.

    Ez

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