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Thread: New technology to me...

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Lakeside, CA
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    There are so many different ways to build nowadays, esp if you go off-grid without the Govt breathing down your neck, i.e. permits...
    Traditional frame w wood
    traditional frame w steel studs (becomes fireproof)
    Pole houses
    Containers
    Straw bale
    ICF

    Then throw in all the siding, roofing, interior wall finish options and you can go on forever.....

    But ya still gotta have a good foundation and good roof overhead, lotsa different ways to do those as well.....good times to be building.....

  2. #12
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    Jan 2010
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    Lakeside, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by GR82BPREPD View Post
    The story of the three little pigs comes to mind, when I am looking for building materials.

    I have seen straw bale, rammed earth, and tire type homes end up compromised because of a lapse in maintenance regimen. In hurricane territory, straw bale construction would concern me.

    They start out marvels of efficiency and hold heat/cold remarkably well. The construction costs are very low, but getting permits for one, might be problematic in hurricane country.
    That depends if you are looking to get permits or avoid them. If you can find land where they are not required, way more better. And I say that as a builder who has always worked under permits on his 'regular' projects. You wouldn't believe the stories. Corrupt, inefficient, unknowledgable building departments and inspectors will make you hate Govt. If you already don't. Don't we all want our BOL's in remote locations anyway?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Central Texas
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    My wife and I have been looking at barndominiums. Metal building on the outside and standard construction on the inside. Iíve lived through enough hurricanes to want something sturdy, even though the coast is a couple hundred miles away or so. Straight line winds and hail are our biggest threat. 70-80 mph winds occur at least once a year, quit often multiple times a year. Golf ball size hail is pretty common too and that will quickly destroy a shingled roof.
    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sweet Tennessee
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    Water will rip the metal off a pole barn just like someone ran a saw around it! Seen it plenty in Louisiana. If you plan to build a pole barn as efficient as a sick built home it will cost more in the long run. Think about it...... you still have to have a floor (concrete) generally you will want a floor covering, you still have to insulate, frame walls and ceilings, wire, plumbing, drywall and fixtures.

    Change my mind.....
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by flock6 View Post
    Water will rip the metal off a pole barn just like someone ran a saw around it! Seen it plenty in Louisiana. If you plan to build a pole barn as efficient as a sick built home it will cost more in the long run. Think about it...... you still have to have a floor (concrete) generally you will want a floor covering, you still have to insulate, frame walls and ceilings, wire, plumbing, drywall and fixtures.

    Change my mind.....

    Around here, the average run of the mill traditional house costs about $130 a square foot for a turn key house. The same size house but utilizing a welded metal building (much stronger than a pole barn) is approximately $75 a square foot!!!

    It only takes a day or two (after the concrete foundation is finished) to erect the walls and roof. From that point on, there are no construction delays due to the weather. Not only that, but all of the wood interior walls are attached to the metal frame, and each other of course. So the materials end up being cheaper, build time is decreased, and you have better protection from the elements. Plus, if barndominiums were so badly built then insurance companies would not give a discount on insurance premiums, but they do. All of the finish items you listed would need to be installed regardless of the exterior so they are a moot point.
    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best

  6. #16
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    Jan 2011
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    Sweet Tennessee
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    I never said they were bad, I said you won't save money if you build it as efficient as a stick built home.
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    NW Ohio
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    If I were going off grid, I would look at building a stackwood house with whatever wall thickness you desire. It's basically on the same premise as a log cabin using split firewood, and small sized log rounds stacked with chinking (or some other sealing agent) with the ends revealed. The beauty of this construction method is the ability to do it all completely yourself (no heavy log lifting/fitting), and it would be virtually bulletproof, not mention retaining heat like no other design.

    If you are looking at a more modern design, look into Geodesic Dome homes which basically looks like a huge golf ball half submerged into the ground. Very efficient heating, and cooling, while also being hurricane proof.

    My other thought is to build a 40x60 pole barn, and back a 40 foot camper into one end leaving enough room for a 10'x40' heated storage area with a loft built over the top of the 20x40 area(camper, and 10' porch). This would leave an area of 40x40 still under roof for parking vehicles, and prep storage. I would heat the 20x40 area with a large outdoor wood furnace which would also provide hot water, and have a composting toilet, and collect rain water off of the 120' of roof gutters.
    Last edited by ckelly78z; 07-25-2018 at 07:05 AM.

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