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Thread: Beyond Bugout - Evac....

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Ft. Worth
    Posts
    813

    Default Irma

    The wife and I had to make some decisions in a hurry as Hurricane Irma approached last September. We were ready to bug in, with plenty of food & water, generator, fuel for several days, etc... I felt pretty confident we could weather the storm here on the Gulf Coast (we are a couple of miles inland from Sanibel & Captiva Islands). As the forecasts began to worsen, we started to stage everything we wanted to save near the back door, just inside the lanai. I didn't want any nosy people driving by to see that we were loading to leave...the back is very private and mostly hidden from view. The fuel cans I had planned to use for the generator in our Plan A would become extra fuel for our vehicles in case we had to bug out with millions of others on the road.

    Then reality struck. Irma was headed right for us, and getting stronger. Plan A was discarded for Plan B, and we had arrangements to stay with extended family in Atlanta. The two dogs were loaded into their crates in the Saturn SUV along with some odds and ends, and my Silverado 4x4 with a fiberglass cap would hold most everything else - guns and ammo included. It took us about two hours to arrange and load everything in the sweltering heat and humidity. Just as we pulled out of the driveway and got to the end of our street the Fire Department was driving by blasting mandatory evacuation order over their loudspeakers. In that moment, we knew we'd made the correct decision.

    We took the back roads north, avoiding the clogged Interstate and saving us over a half hour on the drive north. Once safely in the Atlanta 'burbs, we were glued to the Weather Channel for a couple of days. Hurricane Irma passed right over Cape Coral, with wind gusts in excess of 100 MPH, yet we were spared major damage. The worst damage was south and west from our home, and we never even lost power. But we were safe, with our most precious cargo intact.

    The extra fuel came in very handy on the trip back south, as many gas stations were closed or out of fuel. We managed to make it back home without too much fuss, though, and were in awe of the convoys of fuel trucks and utility crew convoys barreling down I-75 from every surrounding state you can imagine. As soon as my truck was unloaded, I left again to rescue a good friend - an older, single lady - about 25 miles inland. Her home was trashed, and she'd been without electricity for several days. She would charge her phone in her car to send out the occasional message, but she had no friends or relatives to help her. And her elderly dog was suffering with breathing troubles since she was without A/C and rationing her scant food and water supplies. The drive to her home was quite a shock, as the damage was much worse there - trees and power lines down everywhere, standing water was making some roads nearly impassable. I loaded her things and put her in the air conditioned cab with her dog for the trip back to our home. She stayed with us for several days until her power was restored, enjoying a hot bubble bath and some good meals. It felt good to help her out of a bad situation, and we had many discussions on proper prepping. I think she gets it now.

    Moral of the story - good to have a Plan A, better to have a Plan B, and help a neighbor if you can.

  2. #22

    Default

    I wouldn't put my important documents in a safety deposit box at a bank for any amount of money.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Lake LBJ, Texas
    Posts
    8,000

    Default

    My idea of bailing out is 24 hours. No real rush where I am, just wait for traffic and conditions to be right, but before resistance can get organized.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a flood plaine in hurricane country
    Posts
    3,156

    Default

    The "wine cellar" is a good idea for some places in this country. If it is outside of a flood plain a deep and ventilated "wine cellar" can be made to withstand a forest/wild fire. Keep a vaulted room with a safe and if it is insulated and ten feet underground it should survive, dimensions as what one can afford (DIY do it yourself). Remember to close the ventilation and have a good quality heavy duty lock on the door, or even a second door with a lock for security. Maybe also camouflage it with a piece of dry wall.

    If one can load a travel trailer or consumer box trailer (hotshot trailer) then a case of beer is no issue, a keg would be better unless the beer is also for barter.
    Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference. Gladius Republicae!
    "...use Gold like it's gunpowder..."

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    East TN Smokey Mountains
    Posts
    4,849

    Default

    papers belong in a saftety depsosit box at the bank. Most other stuff can be insured.
    dumb, bank safety deposit owners are filed with US Treasury dept

    I wouldn't put my important documents in a safety deposit box at a bank for any amount of money.
    me either

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Helena Montana
    Posts
    1,116

    Default

    We went thru a forest fire on our fairly remote property. What I regret doing was not pre positioning more stuff out side of the danger area. I started hauling "good" stuff out to a storage unit in a area much less likely to burn and that action saved a lot of replacement costs.

    As far as using a underground shelter to save stuff it will have to be fairly sophisticated. We had one shelter that was earth covered burn out entirely. I had a wood framed door in an entrance trench and the fire burned thru and gutted and destroyed it. When you have a forest fire burning large trees and turning everything to white ash it gets hot enough to melt glass and burn tree roots out of the ground.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sweet Tennessee
    Posts
    3,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Junkman View Post
    We went thru a forest fire on our fairly remote property. What I regret doing was not pre positioning more stuff out side of the danger area. I started hauling "good" stuff out to a storage unit in a area much less likely to burn and that action saved a lot of replacement costs.

    As far as using a underground shelter to save stuff it will have to be fairly sophisticated. We had one shelter that was earth covered burn out entirely. I had a wood framed door in an entrance trench and the fire burned thru and gutted and destroyed it. When you have a forest fire burning large trees and turning everything to white ash it gets hot enough to melt glass and burn tree roots out of the ground.
    https://youtu.be/Xd9VwVPEhnQ
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a flood plaine in hurricane country
    Posts
    3,156

    Default

    Borrego, if you are going to bug out you will need to make everything modular. Totes, footlockers, crates, etc. That means keeping everything to be evacuated in the modular containers. A list of everything to be evacuated and its LOCATION must be made prior to the evacuation because during the evacuation no one is thinking clearly. I suggest location because certain species of humans seem to place things in the most illogical places because they just do that (split tails, free bleeders...)

    Should the time come to evacuate, the one hour is done at fifteen minutes because 30 minutes become an hour and a half in three seconds.

    Have the modular containers labeled as well, it is so time consuming searching every container for unrelated items. Also, make sure the Evac List is also with the modular containers. Tape the list to each container, or keep it in the bug out trailer, because the same people who scatter everything because it makes sense to them will have ammo and underwear in the same bag in the tote. I'll post more it I think of more.
    Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference. Gladius Republicae!
    "...use Gold like it's gunpowder..."

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In a flood plaine in hurricane country
    Posts
    3,156

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Junkman View Post
    ...As far as using a underground shelter to save stuff it will have to be fairly sophisticated. We had one shelter that was earth covered burn out entirely. I had a wood framed door in an entrance trench and the fire burned thru and gutted and destroyed it...
    How deep was it? (It was so deep that we called Hell on the local network.{Millenials, that is a Boomer joke, just go along with it}).
    Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference. Gladius Republicae!
    "...use Gold like it's gunpowder..."

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