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Thread: Feral Dog Fatalities

  1. #1
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    Default Feral Dog Fatalities

    Ok from a survival standpoint...

    It is mentioned (though rarely) in survival circles the danger that domestic dogs-turned-feral pose.

    There was a web blogger named "Buckshot" who recounted numerous encounters with feral dog packs.

    Here's what you need to know.

    Dogs are social creatures very much in the same sense as humans, but without the higher abstract reasoning capacity. For example, if a dog knows you have several "cookies" and you give it one, it knows you have more. It can't reason whether it "deserves" more. They can reason, but usually at the level of a 2-4 year old. An exceptionally intelligent dog may be able to reason at the level of a 7-year old child. That is smart enough to pose a lethal threat especially in superior numbers.

    Dogs may be "trained" or domesticated but like humans they possess the ability to change their behavior to suit context. For instance my boy Major. He can tear up a bite sleeve on "fight night" and turn around and be a perfect gentleman in the show ring. Reminds me of the movie "The Kingsmen". When dogs are with their families they know what behavior is expected... but when they become habituated to running with a "pack" that ancient pack mentality re-asserts itself and overrides everything.

    Here we have what appears to be a group of domesticated dogs reverting to "wild" behavior. Buckshot raised the point that if 1st world people were no longer able to feed their pets due to some crisis, rather than put them down expediently, many would set Fido loose to "fend for himself" without giving thought to what predation really means in suburbia. It means dogs doing what nature equipped them to do... hunt in groups and bring down prey many times their size. If that prey happens to be human... their DNA doesn't care.

    Woman mauled to death by 7 mixed-breed dachshunds
    http://m.wdam.com/wdam/db_383264/con...tguid=3RuDyNzS
    Last edited by bruss01; 05-18-2018 at 10:16 AM.
    "The thing about smart people is they seem like crazy people to dumb people" - Stephen Hawking

  2. #2
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    Worthy of mention is the fact that various breeds have specific temperament tendencies/ traits.

    Mastiff breeds (and their derivatives) tend to use defensive posturing... barking, growling... basically warning off a foe to avoid a fight. Terrier breeds were bred to chase rats and eradicate vermin. They were bred specifically for high pain tolerance and zero reluctance to enter mortal combat at the drop of a hat. Doberman Pinschers and Pit Bulls are both descended from terrier stock. They tend to display little or no warning behavior and go straight to "mortal combat" mode.

    Dachshunds are terriers. Not surprisingly, you get several together in a habitual "pack" and those breed tendencies will come to the fore.

    Falling back on my area of experience... this is why in Doberman Pinschers there is a specific temperament test ( the WAC or Working Aptitude Certification) to determine stability suitable for daily human interaction. The dog must be friendly or indifferent with casual encounters but react defensively in a hostile situation... yet within 30 seconds of that hostile encounter, react neutrally with a neutral stranger. In terms of breeding for temperment, that is like watching SpaceX stick a dual synchronized rocket landing. It's a rare thing and beautiful to see in action.
    Last edited by bruss01; 05-18-2018 at 01:59 AM.
    "The thing about smart people is they seem like crazy people to dumb people" - Stephen Hawking

  3. #3
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    A friend of mine breeds a Russian flock protection dog. There are not many of them here in the states. I know Iím going to butcher the spelling, but the breed is called Caucasian Ovarcharka. The breed is used to protect flocks of sheep in Russia in the winter time against predators such as wolves, bears, and mountain lions. A full grown one is typically about 150 pounds.

    Tempermate is extremely important when selecting one of these dogs as a pet, and as an owner you have to assert yourself as the alpha, otherwise they will take the alpha role over you and at that point they become VERY dangerous. In a SHTF situation I could see this happening a lot to domesticated dogs. We have a terrier and try to keep at least one month of food on hand, but if things continued to be bad then I would let our dog out in to the corn fields next to my house. She has caught rabbits and mice before so I know she could do it again.


    As far as packs of wild dogs, I would not hesitate to put them down to keep my family safe. A couple of rounds of CCI Segmented subsonic hollow points should do the trick, and they are very quiet too.
    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best

  4. #4
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    Mauled by datsuns lol. I'm going back to read it, just had to get that out so I could remain objective.
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  5. #5
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    I know, right? Ankle biters! I guess when they run in a pack they have numbers on their side.

    Instead of lunch for a shark - dinner for a school of piranhas. Dachshunds turn up unusually high on insurance claims for dog bites.

    Sausage dogs are the most aggressive dogs
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...sive-dogs.html

    They may be small, but new research found that one in five dachshunds have bitten or tried to bite strangers, and a similar number have attacked other dogs; one in 12 have snapped at their owners.

    Known as sausage dogs for their elongated bodies, dachshunds have not, until now, had a fearsome reputation, although they were originally bred to hunt badgers in their setts.

    However, they topped a list of 33 breeds which were rated for their aggression, after academics analysed the behaviour of thousands of dogs.
    "The thing about smart people is they seem like crazy people to dumb people" - Stephen Hawking

  6. #6
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    feral dog packs is a very real concern here on the farm. this area has been a fido drop off point for years and years. it is not so much a danger to people as it is a danger to livestock.
    though i have no knowledge of a feral pack around here taking a grown cow, they have taken calves around here. goats, sheep, ducks, geese, chickens, domestic cats.

    i have had numerous encounters since i came home, sometimes ending with dogs dead on the ground.

    i have observed that non feral domestics will sometimes form short lived packs and go a'roaming, often ending with livestock down and then they go back to their various homes and are normal dogs to their owners.

    this type of behavior is annoying to a livestock owner who sees the dogs, knows them, but has no proof to show the owners when the fidos come home tail a'waggin, leaving hundreds, sometimes thousands of dollars of dead livestock in their wake.

    dogs will go feral and extremely dangerous very quickly.

    anecdotes.

    middle of night.

    high pitched screaming unlike anything ive ever heard. go out with m4gery, a little 9mm, and a too dim flashlight.

    head toward the sound, which is getting closer. stop and shine light and a little puppy comes out of woods, screaming like a bhaonsidhe.

    relief, it is just a little puppy. remember seeing white dog flashing into the woods with heavy teats a few days before, a white dog i know belongs to a tract on the RR tracks up by the paved road.

    as i turn to go back inside i see a flash, then two more. light on them. two whitish dogs and a darker one down the powerline facing me. hear noise to my right, must be one over there.

    snarl from edge of woods to my left. snarl. dogs in front, dog maybe to right. dog definately to left.

    mighta over reacted, but i began backing away fast as i could hobble, putting out rounds in a semi circle in six or so round bursts every three or four seconds.

    as i had went out my old dog went out with me and the shooting spooked her back to the door but at that point she was so old she could not climb the steps so i hauled her in, slammed the door and did not open it until dawn.

    getting boxed scared the hell out of me and i aint a bit afeered to admit it.

    these were dogs that were fed that day, lived a life in someone's yard or even in their house, yet they instinctvly tried to box me when the puppy got close.

    i believe they arrived as the puppy was just about to break the woods on the powerline right of way, detected me and began to circle.

    i saw 3 in front of me, or rather southward from me on the powerline, facing me head on, i heard the snarl of the one to my left, eastward, as i faced the 3 to my south and the sound i heard, which may or may not have been a dog to my right, westward.

    i offer this tale as an example of just how close to "wild" our domestic canine companions operate. In my opinion, these dogs were aggressively responding to me being close to the terrified, screaming puppy.
    Last edited by ogun; 06-07-2018 at 09:54 AM.

  7. #7
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    good post and I see this being a big post shtf problem that is widely ignored in the prepper community.

    we are also in the "drop off" zone where people drop off dogs because they are too cowardly to humanely put them down or find a home for them so they take them out in the country to either starve to death or be shot by farmers like me.

    so far we have had several dogs kill chickens even thought our perimeter is mostly fenced in. Our chickens free range and we do have a livestock guardian dog, but she is pretty friendly to other dogs.

    anyway, one is in the ground and I got shots at most of the others.

    but if i see any dog or worse yet a pack there will be lead heading their way and I told my neighbors with dogs the same. It is their responsibility to keep their dogs off my farm.

    They come on my property they are tresspassing.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 91CavGT View Post
    ....I know Iím going to butcher the spelling, but the breed is called Caucasian Ovarcharka.......
    I think it sounds something like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bo-qweh7nbQ

  9. #9
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    Holy Flashback Batman! Ogun, great to hear from you again, haven't seen you here much lately.

    Thanks for sharing that account. I don't blame you one bit for back-pedaling your way out of that situation at warp 5. Primal instinct is an amazing and fearful thing to see in action.
    "The thing about smart people is they seem like crazy people to dumb people" - Stephen Hawking

  10. #10

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    Had problems, but not feral nor pack. Neighbors have history of not controllin' their dogs, to the point of going onto somebody else property and barking and prohibiting older guy's wife from exiting vehicle. Guy gets into his house, retrieves a CO2 pistol and fires at dog. Owners take him to court and judge actually makes old guy pay vet bill. Yeah, it's Commiefornia. Anyway, dogs come around my house. I'm in the middle of 13 acres, so it's not like they've just wandered a few feet across a driveway. One night, actually about 03:30, I hear their door slam as they let out dog. I can actually hear the mutt barkin' as it's comin' toward my place. Get up, grab the .22mag pistol and go outside. Sure 'nuff, there's their little Fluffy-poo right in front of the rabbit hutches. One to the body and another to the head, drag the body away 'til daylight, then some shovel work before I leave for work. I won't put up with this **** now and it sure won't have it when times get bad.
    I guess when fluffy-poo didn't make it home, they got the idea 'cause they hung chicken wire on their side of my hog wire fence. Haven't seen much of their dogs since and that's been years. BTW, in this county it's lawful to shoot dogs that're harassin' livestock. If there's a pack of dogs, I just will have to do more shovel work.

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