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Thread: Feral Dog Fatalities

  1. #11
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    Mar 2007
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    Rich, sounds like you have the right idea... address a small problem before it becomes a big one.

    A lot of people aren't mentally & emotionally prepared to shoot a dog. The wife and I are big dog lovers and we'd hate to see it come to that... but you have to realize that every murderer sitting on death row is someone's "sweet little boy" who took a wrong turn somewhere along the way. Same thing happens with dogs. Nature equipped them to be efficient killers.

    A feral dog problem quickly can become like a zombie outbreak. You see one zombie, you whack it, done. You hesitate, out of sentiment or just dithering/reluctance... Soon, instead of one zombie you've got 100 of them surrounding the house. One dog (unaddressed) soon becomes two, two becomes four... Instead of one feral dog, you now have a pack that thinks/hunts with a pack mentality... very dangerous!
    "The thing about smart people is they seem like crazy people to dumb people" - Stephen Hawking

  2. #12

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    Well, bruss01, I love dogs for what they are, but they're just dogs. Just as there're folks who live in the fantasy world where they say think all babies are the same (ask anybody who's had several and they'll quickly abuse you of that notion) I learned early that you can't "love all dogs" as some people profess to do. Babies, dogs and horses are all individuals. Believe me, as a guy who's delivered mail for living, I no more trust every dog or horse than I do every banker/lawyer/doctor/mailman or what have you. Delivered the same house in a small town 5-6 days a week for months with the same small dog on the porch. One day he decided my calf looked too tasty to resist and went for it.
    As for my neighbors' dogs, this county has a law that your animals are to be under your control at all times. I understand that fences break and stock can end up in the road or some neighbor's pasture, but that ain't the same as their predators goin' after the domesticated animals I've chosen to feed, shelter and protect. Dogs are gonna do what dogs are gonna do and I'm gonna do what I've gotta do. I saw " Lady and the Tramp" just as I did "Bambi" and I can still live with reality.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2013
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    Besides being a direct threat to humans, any dog or pack running loose will kill all the same animals that humans do to survive- all livestock from cows to chickens, deer, rabbits, etc. Sometimes they do not stop killing when they get enough to eat but continue killing all the "herd" if they have the ability to do so, wasting all that meat. Many farmers have had their chicken flocks decimated by just one neighborhood dog that "got loose."

  4. #14
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    When we first moved to our rural location over 20 years ago there were very few neighbors.
    Our homestead is on a dead end dirt road 6 miles outside a one stop light town of 2,000 people.

    Over the years, this had been a dumping ground for unwanted dogs. They used to roam in packs. Totally feral.
    I've had to shoot. As much as I love dogs (we have rescued dogs for over 30 years) when a pit bull attacks there is no choice.
    After years of labor, and a wheel barrow of cash, our perimeter is fenced, and the interior is cross fenced extensively. To keep our animals in, and other animals out.
    The perimeter is 47" field fence, the areas for the horses are 5 foot high wire w/ 5 crossboards, the chickens are behind 6 foot chain link.

    However, neither my wife nor I go outside, day or night, without at least a 38 revolver. At least.
    Last edited by rice paddy daddy; 06-12-2018 at 10:41 PM.
    Member: VFW, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, Society of the 5th Infantry Division

  5. #15
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    Wow, and here I thought Florida was packed totally with ant farms full of retired seniors .

  6. #16
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    Feb 2009
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    North Dakota
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    I've seen the Caucasian and think it would probably be a great breed for large herds would not want one as a pet,, specifically for wool sheep llamas, alpacas mixed herd, am thinking along these lines for wool/ yarn production should we face climatic change. But then on the other hand is the big collie breeder that showed up with imported working dog long coated collies in North Dakota,, having had the big collies before I was going nuts over her bloodstock these were triple coated!! Holy fur coat batman!! so now am torn between what will protect livestock on a non typical homestead in an after shtf scenario as well as having a dog or two that would defence two women or more from marauders.. sigh....

  7. #17
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    HA, HA! Pitbulls ain't got nuthin on "sausage dogs". My grand daughter had a miniature dachshund. Sneaky little sh*t, he was. He'd catch you not watching and sneak up on. You would suddenly feel something very warm on your leg/foot. Little bastard done snuck up and pissed on your leg or your foot. Then just look at you with that "what are you gonna do about it, huh?" look on his face.

  8. #18
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    Morgan County, Alabama
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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    HA, HA! Pitbulls ain't got nuthin on "sausage dogs". My grand daughter had a miniature dachshund. Sneaky little sh*t, he was. He'd catch you not watching and sneak up on. You would suddenly feel something very warm on your leg/foot. Little bastard done snuck up and pissed on your leg or your foot. Then just look at you with that "what are you gonna do about it, huh?" look on his face.
    I don't think that leaky weiner would survive very long in my home ......

  9. #19
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    Feb 2010
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    having to shoot pets under some serious SHTF scenarios isn't something I'm looking forward to - but it's for their own good - the smaller inside dogs would suffer a terrible fate if simply allowed to roam - the bigger dogs would go feral and pose various problems - a .22 pistol would be the most humane - nail the dog packs anyway possible ....

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wate View Post
    the ASPCA website says that every year, 800,000 people in the US are dog-bitten badly enough to seek medical attention. you can bet that as many more people escape that fate only by pure luck. If shtf, dogs, cats and people will kill off all the game within 2 months, and in another month, the fish, dogs, cats, known edible wild plants will be gone and the cannabilism will start in earnest. If you 'think" that shtf will be anything but hell on earth, you're lethally naive.
    Has all of that happened in existing places that have experienced shtf conditions, like say Venezuela?

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