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Thread: Flock, would your current livestock plan change after SHTF?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    913

    Default Flock, would your current livestock plan change after SHTF?

    Since you and I seem to be the local goat people, I figured I would address this to you.

    I was thinking about it the other day, I've been kind of ignoring SHTF situtations, just doing my own thing. I did have a thought yesterday about how my herd management/breedings would change after a major SHTF, lets use EMP/lightoutforever as the situation. What would you do?

    First of all, my BOL will be changing this year. It has always been and will always be my parent's place, since they have the property that I just can't afford. They are moving up here and the 10+ acres have been purchased. My goats are already there. It is a small neighborhood of 5-15 acre parcels and all the neighbors are friendly Idahoans. I've come around to the idea that you need good neighbors to survive SHTF, even though my primary urge is to simply bug in and protect me and mine. However, if I'm able, I'll try to espouse the idea that if my neighbor is taken care of, then he won't come for my stuff right away.

    So looking toward livestock, this means that I would start to increase my herd as fast as I can. Those are assets that are already out there to see(read covet) and if I approach the situation to turn my neighbors into goat owners quickly, we will have common purpose. I'll be a valuable ally because I will not only provide them with food assets but I'll have the knowledge and experience necessary to keep their new assets alive to feed them. So as far as breeding plans go, depending on the time of year, I would breed every doe 7 months or older as soon as possible. Since I have so many bucks, they would breed and be butchered before winter feeding to make for less feed to store, leaving one alive until all does are confirmed bred. Granted I have Nigerians, so you aren't going to get as much meat off of them as you would a standard, but 6-7 two-three year old bucks-worth of meat isn't anything to sneeze at initially.

    Nigerian gestatation is 150 days, so I can have any doe back in milk. I didn't intend to breed my show doe so young, but she kidded with twins just shy of her first birthday. That means I went from newborn to milk maker in 1 year. That and she increased my doe count by 2. This year my average for surviving kids per doe is 2.2, and that might go up with my next doe, she is probably carrying triplets. My doe count this year is above average, 7 out of 11, which is awesome. So I more than doubled my milk makers, within a year(if I kept any of them).

    Anyway, this is mostly a brain dump. I'm considering starting up with chickens this year too and my livestock sharing philosophy would be the same. Share the assest and expertise to increase the volume of livestock in the area and win the good will of neighbors. If all goes well, you turn them into livestock sharers too.
    Last edited by Renee; 03-16-2018 at 04:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sweet Tennessee
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    4,334

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    It takes me nearly 2 tons of feed to get through winter.......... I currently don't have that kind of storage and don't foresee having it anytime soon. I also went through 10 rolls of hay and about 50 square bales. I don't have the capability to bale hay.......... I've done it plenty, I don't have the equipment, it would be about a $20k investment, I can buy a lot of hay for that price, and I'm too busy to cut and bale for others to recoup some of my investment.

    I have a Holstein heifer that I've raised and is now bred and should give us a calf in around August and then I should be able to milk around December.

    With all that said, if a major SHTF I would immediately reduce my herd and charge a premium, I would boast their meat and milk making ability $$$..... I would retain 1 buck and 3 of my best nannies, I can easily watch, protect and feed that many. I have around 40 chickens and several incubators, that's what I would focus on because they only need a little grain and can forage to survive except in harsh conditions, I also raise quail and would probably increase that flock x 10 they lay well and go from fresh laid egg to food size in less than 2 months. Also I would cross fence my front field for corn and sunflower crops and then double my garden size the first year and go from there. I can do it, I've thought a lot about it and I will have to decrease the goats and increase the small animals. I also dabble with rabbits and have been "practicing"with a handful.....

    10 acres is a lot of room for Nigerians. If you really tend your pasture you could easily run 50 head but winter would be harsh, and to me goats don't have a good of return on investment of time. Also you would need to think about security of your herd. Goats are super easy to "lose". I have enough minions to provide security aka shepards.... and my k9's. Good luck!
    Last edited by flock6; 03-16-2018 at 06:51 PM.
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    I'm chiming in. I purchased a little 10 acre piece of dirt outside my deer fence. I needed Ag Exemption, and putting cattle there in rotation did not pacify the local appraiser. So I fenced it with 4' goat wire and two barbed wire runners above that. Stocked with Boer goats. Bought a stud buck and auction does and started a herd for my foreman kids to show at county show. Win/Win, I have goats and his kids make some money every year.

    So should the need arise, I would get them away from the county road quick and let them multiply. We can easily get by on venison, wild pig, Javelina, and rabbits, and Dove and Quail until we have increased the herd enough to sustain.

    I do wish I had some milk goat to cross in, but sister has some so may be able to raise and cross them.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  4. #4
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    Sweet Tennessee
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    I guess I should add........ I don't like goat meat, love the milk, just can't handle the meat. I do like lamb in moderation.
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    The feed requirements are one of the reasons I like the Nigerians. I can maintain a breeding trio or quad for much less than a standard. Iím playing with idea of growing fodder for winter month feedings to lessen the dependence on hay.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    In south Texas we have typically about 30-60 days of dormant season for grass and forbes. I don't really need to supplement feed except when we confine does to work with kids. I would like smaller but the Boers work best for me right now with foreman showing them in county show.They are also less dependent on supplemental security. We have coyote, Bobcat, and mountain Lion as predators, but don't have any problems with them.

    I prefer the cabrito to eat, that is roasted or stewed in it's own blood kid.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

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