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Thread: good year for chainsaws

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    North Dakota
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    Default good year for chainsaws

    this year when a nearby town had its "City Wide" spring cleaning weekend, where everyone who is residing there gets to clean out their garage, attic, shed, basement and porches and pile what they no longer want near the curb in front of the house and we scavengers do drive by shopping before the city and county trucks come by to scoop up the good stuff I managed to get my hands on a McCullough 18 or 20 inch it has to be a professional model cause the bar is huge.
    Then when someone in town last month had a garage sale I got an 18 inch definitely cause its on the bar-same company McCollough (spelling?).
    Then this morning I went to a farm auction and got an 18 inch Poulon.
    Now all three of these are as is and I intend to get them there ( working order) as much as I can by watching videos on youtube and if I cant go farther to the point where I am satisfied I will take them to a small engine repair shop in said nearby town and have them finish them up for me..
    For someone who may have to do the shtf scenario by themselves backup is always good.. Nuf Said!!! They are dirty and have tons of dirt and sawdust so my question is what tools do I need to get to tweak, tune and make them rip it up? Hep an old lady cross the street fellas cause I'm on my own here

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    6,865

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    I'm no chainsaw mechanic but would go get some WD 40 and saturate the fuel tank, fuel line, and carb and let it sit.
    Many years ago I'd go mow the yard and weed the garden at the ranch for my grandmother. She has a service contract from Sears on the riding mower. I watched him service one time. This back in the 80's and gas is worse now than then. First thing he would do is remove air cleaner and spray the carb full of WD 40 while he cranked it with the plug wire off. Then go ahead with oil change, clean or replace air filter, air up tires, and then back to carb. Now with plug wire connected he would crank it again, using WD40 as starting fluid. It would fire and run every time and we never had problems.
    So, you might get that WD 40 up into the cracks and crevices of the carb and fuel system, and maybe pull plug and spray some in there. This gas these days sucks.
    I have two boats, two jet skis, and 4 Jeep CJ's and have become a fan of real gas app on phone, and AvGas available at your local county airport for little more than at the pump. Last year the jet skis ran like crap because of bad gas. I filled them and ran with a mix of AvGas and non ethanol 92 octane with a splash of Marvel Mystery oil to help lubricity because AvGas is so dry.

    Good luck with them.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sweet Tennessee
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    2,546

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    Sounds like a good start to me, I service all my own. There's not much to them, dirt dobbers love the mufflers.......
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by silvergramma View Post
    this year when a nearby town had its "City Wide" spring cleaning weekend, where everyone who is residing there gets to clean out their garage, attic, shed, basement and porches and pile what they no longer want near the curb in front of the house and we scavengers do drive by shopping before the city and county trucks come by to scoop up the good stuff I managed to get my hands on a McCullough 18 or 20 inch it has to be a professional model cause the bar is huge.
    Then when someone in town last month had a garage sale I got an 18 inch definitely cause its on the bar-same company McCollough (spelling?).
    Then this morning I went to a farm auction and got an 18 inch Poulon.
    Now all three of these are as is and I intend to get them there ( working order) as much as I can by watching videos on youtube and if I cant go farther to the point where I am satisfied I will take them to a small engine repair shop in said nearby town and have them finish them up for me..
    For someone who may have to do the shtf scenario by themselves backup is always good.. Nuf Said!!! They are dirty and have tons of dirt and sawdust so my question is what tools do I need to get to tweak, tune and make them rip it up? Hep an old lady cross the street fellas cause I'm on my own here
    A good cleaning and new fuel sometimes works wonders. Lots of times the in tank filter or hoses will be crap. Rebuild kits and new hoses etc are cheap. Google how to clean and set carburetor up for them. Sometimes newer ones have special tools that need to be purchased or fabricated. Be careful with this step because if you lean them out too much you'll burn it up. Might be a good idea to take the best one and have it professionally repaired and play with the other 2 yourself. I recommend you get the pre mixed engineered fuel when you are trying to clean and troubleshoot. That sutff is like mixed race fuel.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Helena Montana
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    1,050

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    Flock has it right, bugs love to nest in places that are hard to clean. I have cleaned many mouse nests out of four wheeler air filters.

    Almost all chain saws use oil mixed with the gas to run and lubricate. I have used a handy little device called a "ratio rite" for years mixing the gas and oil or buy small bottles of oil to mix with a given amount of gas. You also have a "bar oiler" which works best with a bar oiler oil but to check your saws out motor oil will work.

    Clean them off with WD40 and a spray can of "brake clean" that is available at auto parts stores.

    The first thing is to get the spark plug out and then plug it into the plug wire and lay it on the metal part of the engine and pull the starter and see if you have spark. You may need to be in the shade because the spark on some can be very faint. Or if you need a jump start on the day just hold onto the plug and touch the engine while pulling the starter cord, it may curl your hair.

    If the chainsaw doesn't spark it may be time to put it in the spare parts bin and move on to the next.

    Now with the plug out of the engine hold your finger or thumb over the spark plug hole and pull the engine and see if it will push your finger off. If you have a compression gauge you should see 100 pds or more of compression.

    If it sparks spray some WD40 in the carburator and see if it will try to run. If you have spark and compression it should be worth cleaning the carb. Look up a exploded view on line either in a parts ordering site or a shop manual you can view. Search the internet for forums dealing with your machines. I use brake clean and dental picks as well as a long bristled wire brush for cleaning small orifices.

    The sad fact is many small engines use plastic fuel system parts or have been run on straight gas and are unrepairable.

    If you take it to a repair shop be very clear on how much they charge and be sure and put a limit on how much they will spend before they stop. Make sure they don't shoe a horse with a broken leg.
    Last edited by Junkman; 08-20-2017 at 11:12 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    North Dakota
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    2,319

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    I saw a video on you tube showing how a guy changed the spark plug he used a tool but I don't know if its specifical a spark plug wrench or screwdriver or what its called. He didn't say the name of the tool and for newbs like me I need to know. There is a shop north of me but what if I am at a bug out location and there aren't any shops around? Gotta have these things on hand I do believe . As it is I have three bow saws that hold a 36 inch blade and that length are hard to come by where I am at now. I don't have any French saws so I need these two different wood cutters for myself if it comes down to me cutting my own wood through deadfall spots. Got it on the broken leg jnkman thanks guys keep me posted in case you think of anything else.

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