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Thread: What is the best way to keep foods cold when the grid goes down?

  1. #21
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    I'll have to try it, thanks for the info

  2. #22
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    Mar 2007
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    The propane fridge in my camper is dual power - it has an electric element that takes the place of propane flame. That element consumes 350 watts when it's on, but of course it is not on all the time, only periodically as needed to cool the fridge. One day I will have to put my Kill-A-Watt on it to see how much it actually consumes in terms of watts per day.
    In a crazy world, it's the crazy man who can get by - and it's about to get cray-cray up in here.

  3. #23
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    Dec 2009
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    Working my way south
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    I've got a couple of wire crates hooked to a chain. I'll drop them into the creek behind the house.
    If keeps drinks really cold. It's spring fed.

    I also keep gallon jugs of water in the bottom of my chest freezer. I put a layer of cardboard on top to keep items from falling all the way down there. It should keep things thawing out for a few days.

    I try to can as much as I can to preserve it , and use the food saver vacuum sealer .
    Last edited by Whirlwind; 09-02-2017 at 02:39 PM. Reason: added content
    "Why yes my coat is brownish
    and I did not support unification."

  4. #24
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    Jan 2011
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    Northern Idaho
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    Time to drop a whole host of "keep it cold" / "preserve it" solutions for long term grid down:

    1. For shorter term, propane or hybrid fridges for RVs are probably your best bet to keep things properly cold.
    2. Solar dehydrators. Screen and wood frames will make great non-powered dehydrators and keep the bugs off. With some modification and glass you can make a solar water distiller with a similar design. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHQBeV5IQA0
    3. If it's relatively dry where you live (won't work in the South during summer), you can use zeer pots. Put your food in the center and keep it moist. Can keep your food up to 25 degrees Fahrenheit cooler than ambient at 0% humidity (50% drops to about 10 degrees). Same concept as swamp coolers to keep yourself cool.
    4. If you live where it's cold enough to snow, dig a big pit (10-20 feet). Cover it, seal it, insulate it. During the winter, fill it with water or compact snow. If you keep it insulated properly it will last a long time during the summer. You can build an ice box to keep things cold.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_house_(building)
      Icebox: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bP9U5_vYACQ
    5. Solar Ice Makers use the day/night warming and cooling cycle to produce ice.
      http://www.solaripedia.com/13/389/55...r_diagram.html
    6. Root cellars will keep cool if you keep them closed.
    7. Use it as an excuse to get a larger solar system. Gear is good.


    Sorry I had to link to the Youtube videos instead of showing them. Forum software didn't like me having two videos in one post.

  5. #25
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    In these parts, you can take the backhoe or X and go down 15 feet and drop your goodies there (with appropriate water proofing) and keep them at 45 any time of the year.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska View Post
    Move up here
    Yeah, but firewood is not cheap in Bethel and cutting your own means twigs. And true you can use the river as a road during the freeze, warming is not a lower 48 issue only. That said, sitting on your @ss in a tank top in Fairbanks in January...not likely soon.

    Ez

  7. #27
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ezmony View Post
    Yeah, but firewood is not cheap in Bethel and cutting your own means twigs. And true you can use the river as a road during the freeze, warming is not a lower 48 issue only. That said, sitting on your @ss in a tank top in Fairbanks in January...not likely soon.

    Ez
    AWWW, come on! Where's your pioneer spirit? (snicker)

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