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Thread: What is the best way to keep foods cold when the grid goes down?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    East TN Smokey Mountains
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    We have a 1,000 gallon (800 usable) propane tank that supplies our heat and cooking for the house.
    Also have an ancient RV with a working propane fridge supplied with a 40 gal onboard propane.
    Working to connect those together.

    Also found on craigslist another propane powered RV fridge, which i think everyone should keep their eye out for. Have it plumbed to a 20lb grill type tank. I still keep my eye out for those - they are scarcer than hens teeth, but waaaay cheaper than a new propane full sized house style.

    So we would have to run the diesel genny for a bit to be able to wind down the 3 regular freezers in our basement until we could consume it and move the rest to the propane fridge / freezers.

    We also have an old timey spring house almost finished, should be done by fall harvest. Not all that cold, maybe about 60F, but would extend life of some things. Our real pan for that is to store canned goods (use Tattler lids that won't rust)

  2. #12
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    Jul 2009
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    Sitting on my fat ass
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    Move up here
    Cry in training - laugh in battle

  3. #13
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    May 2011
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    Central Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska View Post
    Move up here
    I wish I could. I can deal with the cold a LOT better than the heat we have here in Texas.
    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska View Post
    Move up here
    I hate frozen food.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  5. #15
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    Sep 2009
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    KC, Misery-- It's Missouri- you have to 'Show Me'...
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    Run the gen for an hour a couple times a day to keep the contents cold... Don't open the door... You don't need to run the gen full time if you space out the door openings to just before you run the gen...
    leave the gun... take the cannoli...

    In times of strength prepare for times of weakness...

  6. #16
    Join Date
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    Another thing I would suggest is to cram that freezer of frozen food as full as you can get it. That way the food keeps itself cooler. I've had commercial walkin freezers go down and place everything as close together as possible to hold itself until repair can get there.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Mountains & Lakes of the extreme NorthEast
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    Default Rock salt in ice cream making

    Rock salt needs to be mixed with the ice when you make ice cream because it speeds up the heat adsorption of the mixture. Rock salt vs table salt is because table salt in its small crystalline form would cause the cream to freeze too fast, hence the larger rock salt crystals. Sort of like adding salt to yeast when making bread, to yoke the yeast growth.

    Basically, the rock salt is used up in the process. Placing a burlap bag of rock salt looking at the ice cream will not make it freeze faster. It would more act as an insulator..... No offense intended here, just science is science (forget Bill Nye, the liberal science make believe guy)

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    What about an old-fashioned icebox ? That's what many of our grandparents used , including mine .

  9. #19

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    Oops. Wrong quote

    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    Freezing is not something that will be done much in a grid down situation. My camper has enough solar to run the refrig/freezer for a very long time until batteries/solar degrade.
    Propane refrig/freezers will run until you run out of propane. You could likely adapt a propane refrigerator to run off firewood. That would be renewable in any off grid situation.
    Evaporation coolers will cool foods to maybe 20* below area temps in dry locations. Root cellars will always be cooler then above ground temps.
    Last edited by Camouflaged; 08-07-2017 at 07:22 PM.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  10. #20

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    That's what I am referring to. Insulation. Not for freezing. It's also in a "plastic lined" burlap bag as I described in my post. It doesn't desolve because it doesn't come in contact with moisture.
    No offense taken. I've done this many times on off grid camping trips to insulate cold foods. It works and I can reuse the bags of rock salt over and over.


    Quote Originally Posted by Winni View Post
    Rock salt needs to be mixed with the ice when you make ice cream because it speeds up the heat adsorption of the mixture. Rock salt vs table salt is because table salt in its small crystalline form would cause the cream to freeze too fast, hence the larger rock salt crystals. Sort of like adding salt to yeast when making bread, to yoke the yeast growth.

    Basically, the rock salt is used up in the process. Placing a burlap bag of rock salt looking at the ice cream will not make it freeze faster. It would more act as an insulator..... No offense intended here, just science is science (forget Bill Nye, the liberal science make believe guy)
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

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