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Thread: Bee's

  1. #1
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    Default Bee's

    I just purchased a few hives to help pollunate our orange trees.... plus I'll be adding blueberry bushes soon...
    I'm a newbie and will take any advice
    Live Free or Die

  2. #2
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    You purchased hives with bees already established?
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  3. #3

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    Sure. It's easier to start that way but very costly. Wildcat. Did you purchase the nuc's plus the hives or full hives? What kind of hives, Langstroth or top bar? How many frames? What species of bees?
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  4. #4

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    Got any photos?
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by flock6 View Post
    You purchased hives with bees already established?
    No sir.... hives then the bees..
    Live Free or Die

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    Sure. It's easier to start that way but very costly. Wildcat. Did you purchase the nuc's plus the hives or full hives? What kind of hives, Langstroth or top bar? How many frames? What species of bees?
    Langstroth 8 frame..... the bees are from a family friend .... Italian bee's I believe
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    Got any photos?
    not yet....
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  8. #8

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    Oh excellent! That's the best way to get them, from a known source like that.
    That's what I raise, Italian bees. Very calm bees!
    So, what kind of help Are you looking for? Are you planning to raise them organically or will you be using chemical treatments?

    Right now I only have one good piece of advice for you. When you get ready to re-queen a hive, I'd suggest Bee Weaver for a new queen. Their hive ps are resistant to varroa mite, wax moth and other parasites that will kill a hive. Just my suggestion. I re-queened my hives with their queens. I have no issues with those parasites what so ever.
    Also, if you see SHB, ( small hive beetles), if you plan to go organic, get you a pkg of beetle be gone and keep them on hand. They are around 5.00 for a pkg of 50 and they last a long time.

    BTW..CONGRATULATIONS! You are going to love having bees around!
    What state are you in?
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  9. #9

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    The main thing you need to remember when working with bees is to stay calm, move slowly and deliberately, take your time and know your intentions before you open the hive. Wear a suit until you become comfortable with them. If bees land on you, don't swat at them. It will alert the hive to attack. You can gently brush them off of you with your hand.

    I rarely use a smoker but that is a preference depending on how comfortable I am or how agitated my bees might be that day. Weather sometimes plays a big part. It doesn't take long to find your own comfort zone. Everyone has some variation of methods dependant on their own needs and tolerance. You'll find yours quickly.

    There is a lot of information on the web and it can be extremely overwhelming. Just keep in mind, the simplest and least invasive is usually the right choice. Some people tend to go extremely overboard. Their intentions might be good but it tends to shy away the new beekeepers. Keep records and dates after each visit to the hives. That will help you remember things. Assuming your queen for each hive is already in the hive population and not in a cage, once you have the hive placed, leave them alone for at least two weeks. Let them get settled in their new location. Then check them about every 14 days just to make sure your queen is laying and there are no issues that need immediate attention.
    At each inspection, clean away any excess burcomb. That will help keep your hives tidy and easy to work with. Make sure your hives have some ventilation or you risk forming condensation that causes mold and in courage parasites.

    Feed your bees for the first month until they become familiar with their new surroundings.

    That's about it for now.
    Let me know if you have any question of concerns. I'll help with whatever I can.
    I'm so excited for you!!

    Edited to add..
    one more thing.. Take a coffee can to the hives with you. Whenever you remove burcomb or propolis from the hives and frames, don't throw it on the ground or back in the hive. That stuff is like gorilla glue. It sticks to everything, including the bottom of your shoes and it invites predators. Toss it in the coffee can and take it away from the hives. If you know someone who makes cosmetics, lotions etc.. Give it to them. They will love you for it!
    Last edited by Camouflaged; 05-12-2017 at 08:17 AM.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  10. #10
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    Default

    find a local bee club.
    you are going to be amazed at all there is to learn

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