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Thread: Incubating and Hatching Chicken Eggs - Procedures

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    Lightbulb Incubating and Hatching Chicken Eggs - Procedures

    Hello friends,

    For the first time I set up my circulated air incubator for hatching chicken eggs.

    I got many pictures during the process...


    Hatching steps ---> How to hatch chicken eggs


    Comments?

  2. #2

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    Those incubators you show actually have a fairly low hatch rate compared to hen.
    If you want a good hatch with a controlled incubator without spending a lot of money, a Sportsman cabinet incubator with automatic egg turners are the best for the money and quality, and even better is to have a sportsman brooder cabinet for after the hatch. Styro bators are not very efficient.

    Also, candling eggs, you can use a flashlight and a toilet paper roll. Turn off the light in the room and it will illuminate the egg better than one of those candlers.

    You can not tell if an egg is fertile by candling until approx 3 to 5 days after incubation.
    Last edited by Camouflaged; 05-18-2016 at 08:30 PM.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  3. #3
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    This is my totally automatic, no investment in equipment required, no candling needed, no power required incubator. Year after year without fail. Three sitting already this year.





    Last edited by explo72; 05-18-2016 at 08:47 PM.

  4. #4
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    Explo, if I did that to my hens (lift their tail up while chicks is under there), they'd be on me like white on rice.
    Mine don't have much of a sense of humor. Course mine's a whole different breed, and very good mama hens.
    I had a hen a couple years ago kill a juvenile cat that got in the pen. One of the chicks got killed in the fight, but the old hen took care of business.

    I use my hens and ducks to incubate for the most part anymore.

    I built a incubator back in the mid 90's, and it works real good. It has two computer fans, one on top, one on bottom, with heaters on top and bottom. Mine will hold 300 eggs easy, but I can put more than that in there if I have to.
    Used plywood for the outer shell, with styrofoam insulation.
    I have it in the house here in my work room..it's like a piece of furniture with the wood being stained and varnished.

    One problem I have is the elec. going off so much in the spring.
    Unless I start early in December, I can bet on the power going off many times in March/April/May due to storms. Long enough to ruin my eggs.
    I'll get the hens laying early with light and some help with laying pellets, and able to get hatches in Jan/Feb timeline.
    I rather the hens do it though, they do so much better job.
    Early hatches produce stronger chicks, so that's another reason I get the hens broody early, or fire up the incubator during late winter.

    I found those cheaper styrofoam incubators are a hassle for me.
    My house temperature is not constant.
    I don't have air conditioning, and I use a wood stove for heat.
    So, the temp. varies a few degrees. You'd think the incubator would compensate, and it does not.
    I can set the temp for say 99 degrees in a 70 degree room, and that night the room temp drops to 64 degrees, I can check the thermometer, and the temp will say 96 degrees...do that very much, and no hatch.
    Or, the other way around...set it for 99 in a 70 degree room, and the room heats up to 80 degrees (using wood stove is harder to keep constant temp) and the temp in the incubator may say 103.
    So this is my main reason for not using the cheaper ones. My old wooden one will keep constant temp, mainly the way it's built, with two heaters, and two air forcing fans, and very well insulated.
    Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.

  5. #5

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    Explo, that IS the best way. I raised thousands of exotic show fowl so I needed good quality incubators back then. Now days, my hens are my private flock and are doing all the work. Those styro baters suck. They are not consistant at all. I'm not sure what he's talking about temp wise. Those temps and humidities are way too low. Nothing more sad than watching a dry hatch.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  6. #6

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    PS, Are those Cochins? Very nice looking!
    I raise Barred Rocks. Love em. They are such sweet birds, although my roo is a $hitass!
    Last edited by Camouflaged; 05-18-2016 at 10:34 PM.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  7. #7
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    Cammie, do you still raise any exotic fowl?
    I'm looking for some Saipan Jungle Fowl.
    I had them for years, and when I moved here, I sold all my exotic birds.

    I'd also like to get another pair of peafowl.

    Most of my chickens are Asil's and my flock is getting old, lost two this last month due to old age.
    They don't lay the best, but good mama's.
    They hatched off a heap of Khaki Campbell ducks for me this year, enough I can sell some now to recover some feed cost.
    Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.

  8. #8
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    mine are Buff Orpingtons and I could not be more happy with them.
    they are by far the least amount of anything on the farm for the return I get.

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