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Thread: CPR And First Aid Certification Course

  1. #1
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    Dec 2015
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    Default CPR And First Aid Certification Course

    CPR certification and first aid is very important and is a combination of rescue techniques for all peoples. CPR certification is important for everyone, because you never know when you are dealing with a similar situation and if properly trained is able to cope with the situation easier. The first thing to consider is that you should not panic and call for the team of CPR, but do not waste time waiting for them. This is the time when you’re training or CPR certification and first aid is in use. For those who have small children or infants at home should definitely go for this training.
    In the first session you are trained how to deal with choking occurs when a baby in the second session they teach a child to drown handle more than one year. If you have a pool and allows the children to go there, then it is very important for you to attend CPR and first aid certification course. You need to check training classes, which are owned by large hospitals where coaches are licensed and provide instructions for rescue techniques.
    CPR and first aid certification course becomes very important and useful when faced with such emergencies when there is airway obstruction in children. Sometimes the child is unconscious too. It will teach you how to access the situation and deal with confidence, without panic. It's easy to break out in such circumstances, however, if you have passed the certification CPR and first aid, you'll probably feel more confident in dealing with the situation. You can contact local hospitals, community centers, society of the Red Cross or the American Heart Saver on CPR and first aid certification. They conduct these classes at regular intervals.

  2. #2
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    I need to get certified again. There was a time when I taught FA and CPR many years ago. Techniques change. Snakebite treatment is different as well as CPR having changed.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  3. #3
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    Me too on the certification. Mine ran out a couple of years ago.
    Paranoia is merely a heightened state of awareness.

    Fortune favors the prepared mind. -- Louis Pasteur

  4. #4
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    Don't expect too much from CPR.

    Even when EVERYTHING happens exactly as well as it could, the survival rate is pretty poor - on the order of 20% survival to discharge from the hospital.
    And that EVERYTHING means:
    Bystander CPR, activation of EMS, AED after witnessed arrest
    ACLS Ambulance and crew on scene in less than 6 minutes
    Transport to a cath lab
    Catheterized within 60 minutes....

    Miss ANY of those gates and survival odds go way, way down. Don't witness the arrest, don't get the ACLS ambulance in a pretty short length of time, etc?
    Odds are single-digit.

    Its a shame people would rather spend 8 hours learning CPR than committing to spending all of 15 minutes a day walking, eating healthy, and not smoking so they won't need the CPR.

    And virtually everyone who dies from a cardiac event dies from their first one, without ever having any symptoms of cardiac disease.
    Good medicine in bad places

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidel. MD View Post
    Don't expect too much from CPR.

    Even when EVERYTHING happens exactly as well as it could, the survival rate is pretty poor - on the order of 20% survival to discharge from the hospital.
    And that EVERYTHING means:
    Bystander CPR, activation of EMS, AED after witnessed arrest
    ACLS Ambulance and crew on scene in less than 6 minutes
    Transport to a cath lab
    Catheterized within 60 minutes....

    Miss ANY of those gates and survival odds go way, way down. Don't witness the arrest, don't get the ACLS ambulance in a pretty short length of time, etc?
    Odds are single-digit.

    Its a shame people would rather spend 8 hours learning CPR than committing to spending all of 15 minutes a day walking, eating healthy, and not smoking so they won't need the CPR.

    And virtually everyone who dies from a cardiac event dies from their first one, without ever having any symptoms of cardiac disease.
    The survival rate may not be high, but every single life saved is well worth it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidel. MD View Post
    Don't expect too much from CPR.

    Even when EVERYTHING happens exactly as well as it could, the survival rate is pretty poor - on the order of 20% survival to discharge from the hospital.
    And that EVERYTHING means:
    Bystander CPR, activation of EMS, AED after witnessed arrest
    ACLS Ambulance and crew on scene in less than 6 minutes
    Transport to a cath lab
    Catheterized within 60 minutes....

    Miss ANY of those gates and survival odds go way, way down. Don't witness the arrest, don't get the ACLS ambulance in a pretty short length of time, etc?
    Odds are single-digit.

    Its a shame people would rather spend 8 hours learning CPR than committing to spending all of 15 minutes a day walking, eating healthy, and not smoking so they won't need the CPR.

    And virtually everyone who dies from a cardiac event dies from their first one, without ever having any symptoms of cardiac disease.
    .

    Actually, I'm O for 2 on CPR in the field. Can't do much better than 100%.

    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    The survival rate may not be high, but every single life saved is well worth it.
    Sometimes I wonder.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  7. #7
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    You'll use First Aid many times in your life... CPR very doubtful... If someone is serious about that type of prep, do look into buying an AED...
    leave the gun... take the cannoli...

    In times of strength prepare for times of weakness...

  8. #8
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    Drowning or electrocution being maybe the only cases where CPR alone might result in a complete recovery?

    Buddy of mine in the Navy performed CPR/rescue breathing on an infant (his neighbors child) that had drowned in the bathtub, the little girl lived and didn't suffer any lasting effects (that I ever heard about anyway).
    Everything marked, everything 'membered. You wait, you'll see.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by KINGCHIP View Post
    .

    Actually, I'm O for 2 on CPR in the field. Can't do much better than 100%.



    Sometimes I wonder.
    Very accurate... My only in the field experience was an ofer... I have had 2 Heimlich interventions that were successful... Oddly enough a week apart... Both were in a hospital setting (1 in cafeteria and 1 in a patient room)and people, chew your food... A blueberry muffin and roast beef were the culprits.... It's a high % of cardiac arrests that make it to the ER that CPR should never be initiated and against their advanced directives...
    leave the gun... take the cannoli...

    In times of strength prepare for times of weakness...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by HatetosayItoldyouso... View Post
    You'll use First Aid many times in your life... CPR very doubtful... If someone is serious about that type of prep, do look into buying an AED...
    An AED, without the rest of the chain of survival, isn't much help. They are expensive to buy, need constant maintenance, and will be obsoleted by changes in protocol after a few years.

    The money that is spent on an AED can probably be better spent on walking shoes.
    Good medicine in bad places

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