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Thread: CNC machines and their value in a ITEOTWAWKI world

  1. #1

    Default CNC machines and their value in a ITEOTWAWKI world

    I didn't know where to post this. Non preping hobbies, or projects.
    I will leave that up to the moderators (sorry guys. I really don't mean to make more work for you. Maybe I should volunteer to be a moderator as pennance?)

    I have been building a DIY CNC machine and taking notes on the project. A CNC(Computer Numerically Controlled)

    Machine removes material from block of metal, wood, glass, ceramic, stone, whatever you can imagine. It works EXACTLY like a 3D Printer, except it removes material, where a 3D Printer adds it.

    I use this technology to build things like gun parts which need to be within tollerances of .0001 of an inch. I also use it for parts as I need them for other machines around my farm and any parts I have difficulty getting on my own. I have a 3D printer make a wax model for investment casting Because I lack the dexterity on my own to make or carve my own wax molds.

    CNC machines remove material from a rough shaped block of material. In my shop, I investment cast the part, using a wax mold, and finish it with the CNC.

    Why go on and on about this? It might be a usefull tool in your arsenal for survival. Everyone, eventually needs parts to replace something that has broken. Sometimes that part can be made on an anvil, but think how much value you would be to a community, if you could make replacement parts to replace OEM parts on machines that will fail eventually.

    Part of my prep, is establishing myself in the community as the "go to" person for things people want made. I want to be worth FAR more alive than dead.
    Last edited by GR82BPREPD; 12-25-2015 at 04:40 AM. Reason: OMG! Messed up the editing.
    "You can't get rich in politics, unless you are a crook." H.S.Truman

  2. #2
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    Went to school earlier this year to learn machining. Originally planned to get into engineering but my math wasn't good enough. Thought what better way to see how the math reflects reality so figured machining would be the most helpful.

    Some of the newer tech that is available can be mind blowing. Yet even the basic lathe n mill work can accomplish everyday tasks.

    The earth has been thru incredible odds before n their societies always used tools n tech to solve their problems.

    A bunch of folks say the ancients didn't have tech but you can find examples of machining in stone around the world.

    The igigi were the stone cutters of the anunaki.

  3. #3

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    I have manual machines, both mill, drill and lathe. Just less stuff to break.

  4. #4
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    CNC is great when power is plentiful, plans are easily found, and parts are available for making things over and over again. For one-offs? Usually quicker and less power used to run it on a manual mill. If you can manage the infrastructure to run it, it could be a force multiplier though!

  5. #5
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    CNC machines and their value in a ITEOTWAWKI world
    I would assume in any ITEOTWAWKI (as you state) would mean that there was no electric power and while manual lathes and to a lesser extent manual milling machines could be adapted to run with various mechanical power sources a CNC machine could not.

  6. #6

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    True, hiwall,
    Even if we nuke ourselves back to the stone age, the laws of physics and chemistry will not change. I know how to build generators, and I will be back in the 20th century very quickly.

    I even volunteered on a project to restore a steam locomotive. I wanted to know how those engines worked. They are marvels of engineering! Part of my prep has been the acquisition of knowledge because I have seen how the Amish live. I can do it, but I don't want to.
    "You can't get rich in politics, unless you are a crook." H.S.Truman

  7. #7
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    Having the knowledge to build a generator or some other energy source capable of powering a CNC machine is a great skill to have...but having that energy source in a post-SHTF scenario and broadcasting that fact to everyone might not be the best idea. Sure, if things are ideal and you're in a nice, cozy community where everyone loves each other...you might be able to do such a thing. You need to at least consider the fact, however, that being the "go-to guy" might very well make you a target. Just a little food for thought.
    Dustin West
    http://www.thesurvivalresource.com

  8. #8
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    The thing I wonder about is what will the availability be of the cutting tools? They wear out, need to be resharpened and replaced, and are not exactly cheap.

    Now days, you send the dull ones out to be refinished, or buy new ones....not a sustainable process.

    And don't forget to stock up on cutting/cooling fluid.
    Good medicine in bad places

  9. #9
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    Cutting tools can be resharpened in the shop and new can be made. Lard was used for a long time as a cutting oil. Carbide cutters would just be gone once the existing supply was used up.

  10. #10
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    Good luck running lard through the cooling/lubricating system on your CNC machine...
    Good medicine in bad places

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