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Thread: Question on moving water uphill with solar well pump

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NorthCentral WA. (Highlands)
    Posts
    976

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    Quote Originally Posted by KINGCHIP View Post
    Why not put the panels down at the water source? Save a ton on wire. Also, length doesn't effect lift.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdale View Post
    I'd check with Nemo before buying the wire.

    The Nemo Pump I have is 12 volt. I've tested it out and IMHO it's every bit as good as the 9300 at first glance. Only time will tell if it's as reliable, but being built with a FloJet pump it should be.

    The one concern I would have with an AC pump is what starting load will it need to start turning? AC Induction motors need a lot more starting current than a DC permanent magnet motor.

    You might be able to compensate for this with a hard start capacitor or something, wish I could be more help but I'm more comfortable giving advice on a DC system as that is what I run.

    Adding batteries is the very last option I would consider but may be necessary if you plan on running an inverter to convert from DC to AC. An Inverter will not like the constant cycling and non consistent power supply.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdale View Post
    Just remember that charge controllers are rated by their Amp output at battery voltage.

    So the Morningstar will support 60 Amps at 12, 24, or 48 volts, but 60 amps remains the max output. So the max you can get from the charge controller is 48 Volts at 60 Amps (2880 Watts). So if you have a larger solar array you would need to run multiple charge controllers
    That's ok, I'm not as concerned about the output, I'm more concerned about the max input (if there is such a thing) at this point in time. I think in a way I'd rather have 2 X 60A charge controllers instead of 1X120A controller anyway. There'd be more redundency in the system. If after SHTF a controller dies and i don't have a backup, I'd at least be able to run at 1/2 capacity during summer and full capacity during the winter months that the panels are putting out as much.
    2nd Law: In a closed system, the entropy of the system will either remain constant or increase

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Greer South Carolina
    Posts
    31

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    icentropy
    I know this is a late response to your water pumping up hill.
    There is one other method besides power or wind.
    It is call a Ram Pump
    It uses water pressure from a head pressure, source to pump with.
    Here is your basic set up, Dig your shallow well as high up the gully and use the concrete pipe as a holding tank. run a 1.5 inch line down hill in the gully as far from the tank as possible, install the Ram Pump (You can build one from hardware store parts) or buy one commercially. They will pump uphill the distance you need.
    Yes, they take some maintenance. but as long as you have flowing water they run.
    No Power needed.
    Hihobaron

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TN mainly, on the road alot.
    Posts
    6,074

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    ^good one, some can be a pita to get going but do work, simple parts from a hardware store.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    1,490

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    SurvivalBlog article that basically covers a specific pump offering - good overall DIY advice & info on solar water pumping ....

    This article is essentially a poor prepper’s guide to the affordable solar-powered Dankoff Slow Pump. In my case, I put together a portable DIY solar water pump for only $1,500, including photovoltaic panels.

    Water is life and the more ways we can get it, the better. For surface water, the Dankoff Slow Pump is what I would use in many situations. There are so many pumps to choose from, but to make a simple and easy choice; if I could only afford the least expensive, and most reliable solar pump for all surface water sources, it would be this pump. I have the Dankoff Model #1308-12, but I now recommend the #1303-24 as the best for the money for most folks, for several reasons. I learned by doing, and found that I should have got the #1303-24 instead. Learn from the mistakes of others, we’ll likely not live long enough to make all of the mistakes ourselves. [JWR Adds: Dankoff also makes a 48 VDC model.]


    https://survivalblog.com/solar-power...tunnel-rabbit/

    https://survivalblog.com/solar-power...tunnel-rabbit/

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    1,490

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    https://survivalblog.com/slow-pump-well-tunnel-rabbit/


    here's a follow-up discussion of the Dankoff Slow Pump >>> more details and some advice omn usage

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