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Thread: New to cattle, fly control advise needed.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outside of Navasota Texas
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    531

    Default New to cattle, fly control advise needed.

    So my wife and I wanted cattle and we got some. A cattleman veterinarian friend of the family helped us purchase three bred cows for our 33 acre homestead. All has gone well so far. We have three healthy calves, one heifer and two bulls.

    So with all the rain we have had flies and mosquitos are killing us and the cows. Two of our cows have sores from the flies. Whats the best solution for the fly problem? I would prefer the least toxic method possible as we intend these to be a food source. Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by Revolution; 05-14-2015 at 11:33 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    minnesota
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    886

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    I can't remember what we used on the cows when I was a kid, probably toxic as hell. I do remember using a product called Blue Kote on open sores on cows, seemed to work pretty good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    6,865

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    We used rubs that you hang across a gate or opening into water or feed. Not organic. I've heard of traps, but never used or even seen one.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    On my Boat, East Prov., R.I.
    Posts
    919

    Default

    Shell Oil made Yellow plastic hanging rectangle strips w/ some insecticide a lot of yrs. back that Farmers used, no clue if they're still made though.

    Those Fly catching Sticky Rolls w/ Tacks to hold them up are still around.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tx Hillcountry
    Posts
    1,310

    Default


    Put one of these near a salt lick or mineral block. Not sure what too soak it with...
    777 FGG

  6. #6

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    Prevention:
    First off, you need to rotate your cattle into unused paddocks. Run chickens over the used paddocks for about a month, and leave fallow for about a month. Probably longer in summer. Why? Blow flies use fecal matter to lay their eggs in, when there aren't good hosts around, so fecal matter attracts them. Chickens spread it out, dig it into the soil, and eat the larva and eggs. Leaving the paddock fallow (unused) for a month breaks the breeding cycle on almost all livestock parasites including your flies.

    Treatment:
    I have sheep and a few cattle, so most of my information is geared toward sheep. Sheep are very sensitive to chemicals and don't tolerate topical treatments very well. This has to do with the way their wool traps things onto their skin. Contact your grange coop or vet and get a spray containing diazinon or high-cis cypermethrin. Those can provide protection from blowfly strike for 3 to 8 weeks. On a scale of bb-gun to a-bomb. These are on the A-Bomb side. Your vet can point you in the direction of the bb-guns, when you have the current problem under control.

    Treatment of Lesions:
    Here is where things get messy. Lesions form where there has been a blow fly strike. They have laid eggs under the skin and the maggots have hatched and broken out through the skin. You need to restrain the animal, and debride the wound. You want to do this a few times with the vet. If the wound is large, an anesthetic will help. I dress the wound afterward to prevent infection and keep any other fly strikes from happening. I also keep the animal in an isolation stall and change the dressing twice a day until the wound starts drying out a bit.

    Vets:
    With 40 sheep and 5 Dexter cows, I am on a first name basis with the local vet. She is out here about 4 times a year and we do well at managing parasites. So far, I have not had any major problems and the check ups are mostly spot checks and prevention.
    Last edited by GR82BPREPD; 05-15-2015 at 04:52 PM.
    "You can't get rich in politics, unless you are a crook." H.S.Truman

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Outside of Navasota Texas
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    531

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    I called my vet and talked to a few neighbors with cattle, so far the consensus is Permethrin, use as directed. I will be doing some reading on it tonight.

    Gr8, there are no major lesions or maggots just irritated spots on the exposed skin around the anus, I do have a squeeze shoot if needed.

  8. #8

    Default

    Sounds good. Remember the rotation. It sounds silly, but that is your best and most effective weapon in managing parasites.
    "You can't get rich in politics, unless you are a crook." H.S.Truman

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