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Thread: Could a drought trigger SHTF?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by borrego View Post
    I'm surprised they haven't started desalinization by now......
    They do that in places, epa might prevent it in cali. Epa doesnt hav ur best intrest at heart either, they wanna fine their way up.

  2. #12
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    Cali has at least one already either in production or under construction. It's the wave of the future regardless of what the EPA has to say.

    Joe - NY

  3. #13
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    Erin Brockavich did a special on satellite TV, "Last Call to the Oasis." It addresses worldwide water shortages and the impact on civilization. A must see.
    To answer your OP question, we are already in a SHTF situation with water. Sierra Nevada communities which would normally be under snow right now are dry. No snow.
    You have heard the joke about the west; it's hot, but it's a dry hot. Because humidity makes the heat more heater (hot). Humidity does the same with the cold weather.
    Now we can say; it's cold, but it's a dry cold!
    Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference. Gladius Republicae!
    "...use Gold like it's gunpowder..."

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by VoorTrekker View Post
    Erin Brockavich did a special on satellite TV, "Last Call to the Oasis." It addresses worldwide water shortages and the impact on civilization. A must see.
    To answer your OP question, we are already in a SHTF situation with water. Sierra Nevada communities which would normally be under snow right now are dry. No snow.
    You have heard the joke about the west; it's hot, but it's a dry hot. Because humidity makes the heat more heater (hot). Humidity does the same with the cold weather.
    Now we can say; it's cold, but it's a dry cold!

    Yeah, typically in Texas, when it gets cold it feels colder than other parts of the country because of the high humidity here. However, over the last couple of months we have seen dew points in the teens on several occasions, and in the single digits a few times as well. That is seriously dry air for central Texas compared to what it usually is.
    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best

  5. #15
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    10,000+ years ago the desert in Cali looked like the pacific NW... Climate does change...
    leave the gun... take the cannoli...

    In times of strength prepare for times of weakness...

  6. #16
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    Could a drought create a SHTF scenario? Yes. Some more pie-in-the-sky than others, but it wouldn't be anything widespread and would be very short lived.

    1. US food sourcing is globally distributed. This morning I ate a cookie baked in Iowa and I am eating a banana from Guatamala right now. Probably go to Chipolte for dinner tonight which sources organic from all over the US. Go to Target and look at the country of origin on all the food products. It's all over the board.

    2. Any ideas of a "dust bowl" need to be put to sleep. Agricultural science has evolved greatly since the 1920s. The land conditions today in drought areas are not the same land conditions of the 1920s. Very poor farming practices and human agency runamuck created the conditions for it to happen. Mother nature taught them a lesson. REMEMBER... the "dust bowl" did eventually end and it wasn't through human agency. The recovery was mother nature as well.

    3. Erin Brockavich is an idiot. You shouldn't believe anything she says. If you are worried about water shortages, take 30mins and Google "graphene water filter". You will be put at ease.

    4. The USA is resilient, adaptable and loaded with both money and education. We tend to figure things out and adapt more-so that other parts of the world. This is why the USA is stable and a great place to live.

  7. #17
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    Water and populations ARE a big deal, don't kid yourself. The US will be fine, not sure about the rest of the world. The US DOES NOT have plenty of money, and money is irrelevant to this discussion anyway. The US will be fine because we are natural resource rich. Americans are in general dumb as horse$hit, so don't count on the masses to take action. Water in the near future will cost a lot more from your tap.

    Found this link to a population clock, pretty neat:

    http://www.census.gov/popclock/

    The world can handle maybe 9 billion people, probably slightly less. We are currently over 7 billion, with a growth rate of about 1.4%. Scientist don't think humans will push the envelope that far, but I disagree. If the target date for hitting max capacity is say 2050, look for the STHTF (and I mean really hit the fan) around 2030.

    Joe - NY

  8. #18
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    Slo, how u figure the world can handle 9billion, we not doing so good with 6+billion?

    Droughts are going on all over the world, increased population will dramtically increase the need for resources that are not available.

    There are cities in west tx, that are ghost towns now, cause they dont have the water they need, this is happening all over other places. I guess yall r proposing folks give up their rural land to live in a unsustainable city, so the resource go to those who dont appreciate them and waste them. Right

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alredneck View Post
    Slo, how u figure the world can handle 9billion, we not doing so good with 6+billion?
    I think you misunderstood the intention of my words and point. I personally think that at 9b people it will not be an easy slog by a long stretch, and by this I mean wars, incursions, etc. And countries will begin to see the writing on the wall a few decades before hitting the 9b number.

    Oh, and btw, there are now over 7b folks to share the love with on this planet. LOL.

    Joe - NY

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by OscarMike View Post
    Could a drought create a SHTF scenario? Yes. Some more pie-in-the-sky than others, but it wouldn't be anything widespread and would be very short lived.

    1. US food sourcing is globally distributed. This morning I ate a cookie baked in Iowa and I am eating a banana from Guatamala right now. Probably go to Chipolte for dinner tonight which sources organic from all over the US. Go to Target and look at the country of origin on all the food products. It's all over the board.

    2. Any ideas of a "dust bowl" need to be put to sleep. Agricultural science has evolved greatly since the 1920s. The land conditions today in drought areas are not the same land conditions of the 1920s. Very poor farming practices and human agency runamuck created the conditions for it to happen. Mother nature taught them a lesson. REMEMBER... the "dust bowl" did eventually end and it wasn't through human agency. The recovery was mother nature as well.

    3. Erin Brockavich is an idiot. You shouldn't believe anything she says. If you are worried about water shortages, take 30mins and Google "graphene water filter". You will be put at ease.

    4. The USA is resilient, adaptable and loaded with both money and education. We tend to figure things out and adapt more-so that other parts of the world. This is why the USA is stable and a great place to live.
    1. Take out the computers and you don't have a food distribution system.

    2. Any lessons learned by the farmers around me have long been forgotten. They are tearing out shelter belts and hedge rows as fast as they can. With the death of the small farmer came the death of fence rows. Now if geographically possible they farm sections of land without interruption. If we go a couple of years without rain we could face the same problems. The Ogallala Aquifer running through western Kansas is down 60' and will be depleted in the next couple of decades.

    3.I agree Erin Brockavich is an idiot (like all libs and commies).

    4. Maybe people are different where you live, they are a bunch of idiots where I live.

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