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Thread: black salve

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by samurai64 View Post
    Look for ichthammol. Like Fidel says it is an old time remedy created to treat saddle sore and boils during the wagon trains heading west. Probably will not work on moles. Those are best taken care of by MD. They can also look at them to evaluate if benign or not.
    Yes, moles are generally a cosmetic thing, and they are not caused by infections/etc., so I would really doubt a home remedy short of excising them would remove them. A dermatologist is the person to see for moles.

  2. #12
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    great plains, OKie in Michigan
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    I've taken a teaspoon of vinegar and 2 aspirin mix them then apply to mole maybe twice a day with Q-tip it is a slow process but it's worked for me . Removed 2 that way, just acid enough the take a layer at a time .

  3. #13
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    hi there..
    new to whenshtf,and i realize this post is very old..
    however..
    black drawing salve is wonderful...and.harmless..it will.draw out poison from spider bites,skin infections,glass,thorns,wood splinters..you name it..it will.also.pull out skin cancer..all the way down..the tubal with.it.
    i make this(just made a large batch),and i use it often on me,and my children..
    amish recepie is good..you can find online easy..make it yourself..its expensive..
    Peace

  4. #14
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    Well welcome to the group. Thanks for your input.
    Vox Populi!

  5. #15

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    Black salve is better than anything perscription I've used. Indians used it . If you're prone to boils, acne or sores, it's good to keep some around. I don't think I would use it on undiagnosed moles that could be mel though. Before you use the salve, make very sure the affected area is VERY clean. You don't want to lock in bad bacteria.
    Black tar soap is really good too.
    Making good people helpless, doesn't make bad people harmless!

  6. #16
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    I just looked on youtube.. go see what they are doing there to make their own,,, lots of options..

  7. #17
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    OK, since we are reviving old home remedy threads, lets talk ammoniated mercury. Grampa always had a homemade first aid kit under his seat. It contained a tube of the drawing salve mostly for thorns, ammoniated mercury, mercurochrome, and a snake bite kit which was the suction cup method of the time.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  8. #18
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    Montana
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    OK, the snakebite kit won't do anything good, and you can get carried away cutting.
    The two products with mercury in them are toxic...
    And black salve is just an irritant.

    Not recommended
    Good medicine in bad places

  9. #19
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    Yea snakebite treatment has changed so many times over the years. When I got my EMT-A it was restrict blood flow and ice. Now I think it is don't do anything but keep below heart and keep calm(which I might have personal trouble doing after a snake bit me), and get to hospital.

    Also knowing that a friend got bit on finger, jumped into his dune buggy and headed to town. He had to open three or four gates but made it to county road and about 4 miles total before passing out and wrecking buggy. Another rancher came along and found him and got him to hospital. Lost that finger.
    Last edited by KINGCHIP; 12-28-2016 at 10:29 AM.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  10. #20
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    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by KINGCHIP View Post
    Yea snakebite treatment has changed so many times over the years. When I got my EMT-A it was restrict blood flow and ice. Now I think it is don't do anything but keep below heart and keep calm(which I might have personal trouble doing after a snake bit me), and get to hospital.

    Also knowing that a friend got bit on finger, jumped into his dune buggy and headed to town. He had to open three or four gates but made it to county road and about 4 miles total before passing out and wrecking buggy. Another rancher came along and found him and got him to hospital. Lost that finger.
    For extremity bites I've seen keeping the limb below, elevated, and at equal level with the heart all recommended in different books/references going back decades. Don't recall now what the current recommendation is. Wilderness Medicine, 4th Ed (1994), by William Forgey says "at heart level or slightly above in a postion of function". And then, "apply suction with the extractor".

    Suction isn't recommended now (http://www.doctorross.co.za/wp-conte...-clin-n-am.pdf), but there's still a lot of older articles around from when it was, and why and under what circumstances it made sense (ie, http://tpwd.texas.gov/education/reso...live/snake-bit).

    My understanding of the reason why the extractor/suction is no longer recommended largely comes down to four major reasons:

    - In the few studies done it didn't extract any significant amount of venom. 2% of the mock venom (injected with a curved needle at typical pit viper puncture depth) was the average removed, although I believe the maximum in one case was 7%. An earlier, poorly documented, study said upwards of 30% was removed but it was simulated with rabbits (not pigs/people as later studies). To my knowledge, there's never been any studies done for atypical bites (shallow or grazing, for example), or studies on the extractor use on dogs or cats who are the most common victims of snakebites.

    - The extractor itself may cause localized tissue damage/necrosis at the site (and in the shape/size of the suction cup) it's applied to,

    - The availability of cell phones/Life Flight, and

    - The CroFab antivenin available now is much safer than the old antivenin that was derived from horse serum.

    In short, based on two studies (a total 10 pigs and 8 people), there's no firm evidence the extractor will remove any significant amount of venom from a person (or pig) from a typical bite wound, can cause additional injury, and probably just wastes time better spent transporting them to a hospital for care.

    In a strictly griddown, no help coming, you're on your own situation there's some old literature about treating snake bites in the pre-CroFab days (the horse serum was nearly as dangerous as the venom from what I understand). Surgical removal of the tissue surrounding the fang wound channels being one method (first one maybe not suitable for the overly squeamish):

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...00243-0086.pdf
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...00042-0041.pdf

    For a bite on a finger or other area with little subq fat and internal structures close to the surface, a surgeon would probably be needed. For a bite on a flabby fold of skin, or on the ass, maybe surgically removing the envenomated subq tissue around the wound channels might be worth a shot assuming you had the necessary equipment and a clean place to attempt it - local anesthesia, antibiotics, antiseptics, field surgery kit, and lots of clean dressings. Could be life saving, or they may die from a resulting infection (and the autopsy later reveals it was a dry bite). Pick a card?
    Everything marked, everything 'membered. You wait, you'll see.

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