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Thread: TX low maintenance, edible n medicinals.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Default TX low maintenance, edible n medicinals.

    Op, lookn at replacing some worthless plants here in houston with edible n or medicinal plants, that require minimal maintenance.

    We have 1ea, lime tree n lemon tree, but they dont produce seed.

    1ea aloe vera, ( how do you store aloe vera long term )

    Suggestions for herbs, medicinals, n edibles, need to be kept legal for TX, if this was CO things b different.

    Raised beds roughly 3ft wide by 40ft long already in place. Small hobbit sized green house also in place, but would like to change out for a hoop shelter. Room inside for plants but lighting is not very effective.

    Ive grown several different kinds of plants in the past, but def not farmer john.

    Plants by season would be helpful. Also any info about sending excess vegs to a local farmers market would be helpful. Growing distaste for local grocery chains.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Outside of Navasota Texas
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    Plantain is good for insect bites upset tummys. Dogs cats rabbits and chickens like it, I don't care for the taste but it does wonders on ant bites and wasp stings.

    Easy to grow. Grows wild in most of texas.

    Edit: plantain the perinial weed not the banana.
    Last edited by Revolution; 12-01-2013 at 09:42 PM.

  3. #3
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    Mint, rosemary, dill, basil, blackberry, blueberry, sage, lemon grass, etc. you should be able to keep almost everything alive n Houston. Pomegranate trees produce well and are low maintenance. They'll survive here, but I'll bet in Houston, they'd thrive. My grandmother grew bananas with some success in Houston as well. Satsuma oranges grow well south of Waco, here they're indoor plants from November to march.
    Common sense is so uncommon nowadays it ought to be reclassified as a super power

  4. #4
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    Was wondern how berry bushes did down here. Between the fruit, the thistles will add to security.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alredneck View Post
    Was wondern how berry bushes did down here. Between the fruit, the thistles will add to security.
    I would go to a local nursery, and tell the manager (they normally have a degree in this kind of thing, mine has a phd) you want the ability to grow some sustainable food supply, and what will survive here? They'll be able to tell you what will and won't, as well as what trees need to be planted in pairs for cross pollination. For instance, my plum and peach trees do not need other trees around to produce. I didn't have the space for more than one each.
    Common sense is so uncommon nowadays it ought to be reclassified as a super power

  6. #6
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    Echinacea flowers, good for colds and immune system booster. Stevia natural sweetener. Elderberry's are also good antivirals.
    Preparing so that I may live better today and post shtf.

  7. #7
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    Ak, the lime n lemon trees dont require pairs, forget what thats called.

    Was wondern if they could be cut n cloned? Wondern the same for the aloe vera.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alredneck View Post
    Ak, the lime n lemon trees dont require pairs, forget what thats called.

    Was wondern if they could be cut n cloned? Wondern the same for the aloe vera.
    IIRC, since aloe is a cactus/succulent, you can cut a leaf off, and root it. My dad always cut cactus off, dusted the cut with sulfur, let it lay out in a dry place for a week or two, and put it in the ground. I don't remember him doing it with aloe, but every other succulent I've had experience with did it pretty easy.
    Common sense is so uncommon nowadays it ought to be reclassified as a super power

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