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Thread: Grafted fruit trees - good or not?

  1. #21
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    Aug 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angie View Post
    Gotta be careful with that advice. With many grafted trees and bushes, the graft must be buried under the soil in cold climates or the tree won't survive the winter.
    That is one thing to remeber every local is different and folks should tak to a knowledgable agent for the area you live. Alot of things will grow here until we have a hard freeze with -10 wind chill or a heat wave of 100+ degrees for 45 days strait. Both of which we have had in the last year.

    My peach trees did not make it, between the cold, the heat, the crought, the grass hoppers, and the deer.

  2. #22

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    Originally Posted by Angie
    Gotta be careful with that advice. With many grafted trees and bushes, the graft must be buried under the soil in cold climates or the tree won't survive the winter.

    Good point Angie. Not everyone is planting what I have planted and where I have planted it! Everyone should check with their nursery for planting instructions. Just for the sake of full disclosure, I am from Wisconsin and my experience is primarily with Apples (hundreds planted) and a bit with sour cherries (dozens planted). At least with those two I can say that I have always had the best luck with the graft scar above the ground level. Our summers occasionally touch 100 and our overnight winter lows occasionally touch 30 below zero (although usually with snow cover).

  3. #23
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    Dec 2010
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    Pacific Northwest, US
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    Your local AG extension office is always a great resource.

  4. #24
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    Jan 2011
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    Thank you everyone for the help!

  5. #25
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    Jan 2010
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    southern Ontario, Canada
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    Just to revive this thread...

    Grafting can take place not just within a species, but, with a plant family too. For example: apples and pears are related (distant cousins) to each-other, and to hawthorn and quince. Skilled grafters can successfully graft one onto another; personally I have seen a couple of successful "hawthorn rootstock + apple and pear branch" specimens.
    I hope to experiment with this in the future, because hawthorn in quite common in my neck of the woods; it seems to grow well and be quite hardy, making it an ideal choice for rootstock.

    Using similar logic: you can graft your choice apple varieties onto existent crab apple trees.

  6. #26
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    Jan 2010
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    southern Ontario, Canada
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    One other benefit to grafting: you can put multiple varieties onto one tree. For people with limited space, it can be a great way to get variety. (Ex. Cherry Tree in my parents urban backyard has 5 varieties including the root-stock, which still has a fruiting branch). This means alot of flavors, and even an extended season, from one tree.

  7. #27

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    i just planted an apple tree, so i found this thread at the right time.

    i do have a question. do apple trees need to be planted in pairs or should the one do fine on its own?

  8. #28

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    Grafting multiple varieties onto one root stock helps. Apples are need a pollinator, it cannot pollinate itself. The more varieties planted the better the chances of a good set. Also remember that you need two different varieties that set blossoms at the same time. Some are early, some mid and some late and all the rest in between. So find two that overlap for a few weeks. And as mentioned, crab apples are a good choice is you have a large orchard. Diversity in nature is ok. Suggest you contact you local ext agent near you. Also go down to the library or used book stores for books on the subject. If you are planning on feeding yourself, better study up on the subject. There are more than 600 varieties of apples, and hundreds of rootstock. You need one that is best suited for your area and soil conditions. You'll need to know about protecting your trees as well. And then there's pruning... so buy a good book on the subject.

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