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Thread: Grafted fruit trees - good or not?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by brushbuster67 View Post
    I wish them boys at A&M would figure out something to graft on Mesquite. Now that would be a earth mover.
    Thats a billion dollar idea for south texas. My dad spent tens of thousands getting rid of just a small portion of that stuff.

    I still remember the sounds of the mesquite beans in the lawnmower from high school.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponies View Post
    I've had to destroy three fruit trees because the grafts were so badl The wild plum or whatever started coming up from the graft -- it is nearly impossibly to get rid of. I don't know how to buy trees that won't have that problem. Just something to watch out for, I guess.
    dealing with grafted trees, as long as the graft stays alive you trim the root stock (anything below the graft) back. Also look up grafting and budding it is not that hard to do. If you have good root stock and know somebody that has a fruit tree.

    around here they bud and graft 1oo's a day. Pecan trees that is, if the graft does not take do it agian next spring.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ponies View Post
    I've had to destroy three fruit trees because the grafts were so badl The wild plum or whatever started coming up from the graft -- it is nearly impossibly to get rid of. I don't know how to buy trees that won't have that problem. Just something to watch out for, I guess.
    Thank you for this warning ... I see it as another reason to make sure to get from a place that knows what they're doing!

  4. #14
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    Up here all dwarfs and semi dwarf fruit trees are grafted and has been for decades. We just planted 14 grafted trees Cherry, pear and apple after reading here about the benefits of having your own orchard.

    We've had a few apple trees for a long time and the deer are quick to grab them when they fall. I suppose it would be prudent to store some in the cellar and even make cider.

    Grafts have stood up to the test of time as far as I'm concerned. Of course you have to put some faith into the orchard that chooses the correct rootstock.
    ...because without American there is no free world...you betcha!

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparrow View Post
    Thanks Daca ... that is the one thing that wasn't one my list ... I am going to reconsider ... but could you tell me why it would boost apple production? Better then having a different apple close by?
    I believe that it has to so with all of the crossbreeding that has been done on the apple fruit stocks over the decades. By having a dissimilar but compatible pollenator this increases the number of blossoms that are successfully pollenated. Not too many apple trees (if any) are self pollenating and unlike some other types of fruit there are no male/female cultivars for pollenation purposes.

    By havint that cross pollinator on your property rather than 2 or 6 miles (3 to 10 k mol ) you will insure that the bees have better access to that pollen for your other trees.
    Bureaucrats are like rabid pitbulls with blinders...Its always better if you don't draw attention to yourself.

  6. #16

    Default Tree Sex

    You asked about apple seeds. You can plant them and they will produce an apple tree... trouble is you don't know what kind of fruit that tree will produce (other than that it will be some kind of apple). The part of the apple we eat is genetically part of the "mother" tree (the tree with the flower that produced the apple). The seed (the offspring) is genically half the mother and half the "father" (the tree that the plloen came from that pollinated the flower in the spring). The apples that that seed will produce are....anyone, anyone, Buhler... identical to the mother tree remember? Only now (a generation removed) the mother tree is of unknown parentage and who knows what you will get! What if the father tree was a crab apple? I would hate to wait years to find that out! While unlikely it is hypothetically possible to even have different seeds in the same apple. Each of the five sections of the "star" when you cut an apple in half could have a differnt "father"! Half-Siblings! So, the only way to know for sure what you are going to get is to graft from a known tree (asexual reproduction) and then the offspring will be 100% from the "mother" tree, not just 50%. Like you said Yeah for grafting!

    By the way, grafting is also the difference between dwarf, semi-dwarf, and standard size trees. It is the rootstock that determines how big the adult trees get. Hope that's not more than you wanted to know about "tree sex"!
    Last edited by cache registrar; 04-21-2011 at 05:54 PM.

  7. #17

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    When you plant, find the scar where the root was grafted to the trunk of the tree. That scar should be 3 or 4 inches above ground when you are done. This will help prevent the problem of shoots coming up from the rootstock that ponies mentions above. It the roots do send shoots up, just cut them off at ground level.

  8. #18
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    Welcome aboard the good ship Cache Registrar. You did a much better job of explaining it than i could have.

    Same goes with Pecan trees, the root stock will be native sapling you improve the quality of the pecan by grafting from a known tree.

    I have done a few from time to time, I prefer the ring or patch budding method with pecans. I have not really don anything with fruit though I a have a source for all the wild plums I want to dig up so I might try it out also.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by cache registrar View Post
    You asked about apple seeds. You can plant them and they will produce an apple tree... trouble is you don't know what kind of fruit that tree will produce (other than that it will be some kind of apple). The part of the apple we eat is genetically part of the "mother" tree (the tree with the flower that produced the apple). The seed (the offspring) is genically half the mother and half the "father" (the tree that the plloen came from that pollinated the flower in the spring). The apples that that seed will produce are....anyone, anyone, Buhler... identical to the mother tree remember? Only now (a generation removed) the mother tree is of unknown parentage and who knows what you will get! What if the father tree was a crab apple? I would hate to wait years to find that out! While unlikely it is hypothetically possible to even have different seeds in the same apple. Each of the five sections of the "star" when you cut an apple in half could have a differnt "father"! Half-Siblings! So, the only way to know for sure what you are going to get is to graft from a known tree (asexual reproduction) and then the offspring will be 100% from the "mother" tree, not just 50%. Like you said Yeah for grafting!

    By the way, grafting is also the difference between dwarf, semi-dwarf, and standard size trees. It is the rootstock that determines how big the adult trees get. Hope that's not more than you wanted to know about "tree sex"!
    That may be the coolest explanation on this topic I've seen!

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by cache registrar View Post
    When you plant, find the scar where the root was grafted to the trunk of the tree. That scar should be 3 or 4 inches above ground when you are done. This will help prevent the problem of shoots coming up from the rootstock that ponies mentions above. It the roots do send shoots up, just cut them off at ground level.
    Gotta be careful with that advice. With many grafted trees and bushes, the graft must be buried under the soil in cold climates or the tree won't survive the winter.

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