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Thread: The care and feeding of Cast Iron Cookware.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Franklin Indiana
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    191

    Default The care and feeding of Cast Iron Cookware.

    Everyone knows that a good seasoned cast iron skillet is a treasured possession, you can fry, saute and bake in them.
    There are some steps to take to make sure your cookware is seasoned properly.


    1. Wash utensil in hot, soapy water. Use soap this time only.(this is the only time you should use soap) Rinse utensil and dry completely.place in 350` oven for 5 min.

    2. Apply a thin, even coating of melted shortening (Crisco, Wesson, etc.; do not use butter or butter flavored shortening, or vegetable oil for seasoning) to the utensil with a soft cloth or paper towel. Apply inside and outside ( If your cookware has a lid, make sure you season it as well.)

    3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place utensil on top shelf of oven, upside down. Place aluminum foil on a baking sheet and put on bottom shelf of oven to catch any drippings. Bake in oven for one hour, then turn oven off and let utensil remain in the oven until cool.

    4. To clean utensil after use, use boiling water and a plastic scrub bun or brush. Do not use soap, unless you are going to repeat the seasoning process. Do not put in dishwasher.

    5. Always wash immediately after use, while still hot.

    6. After washing utensil, dry thoroughly, then spray lightly with vegetable oil, (Pam, for example), wipe with a paper towel, and store. Never store utensil with lid on. (Cast iron needs air circulation.)

    7. Do not use utensil as a food storage vessel.

    8. To remove heavy food or grease build-up, scour with steel wool, SOS pad, etc., then re-season.

    9. Deep fry in Dutch ovens at least six times prior to cooking beans of any kind. Re-season utensil after cooking acidic foods, such as beans or tomatoes.

    10. Follow these simple steps Cookware can last a few lifetimes.

    Seasoning is an on-going process. The more you use your cast iron, the better seasoned it gets.
    Well seasoned cookware should have a shiney black surface to it.
    Try to avoid using metal utensils in your cookware, to avoid scratching the seasoned nonstick surface.

    Also if your pan has alot of crusty build-up on the outside of it, run it through a cycle in a self cleaning oven to burn the scale off, then you can use a wire brush or light sandpaper to clean it up, and make sure you season it a couple of times befor cooking in it.





  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Fort Pierce
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    Default

    Or throw it on the grill after the burgers are done, instead of wasting all the heat that is left.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Franklin Indiana
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by piranha2 View Post
    Or throw it on the grill after the burgers are done, instead of wasting all the heat that is left.
    That will work as long as the grill is hot enough to maintain a higher temp for at least 30 min, 45 min to an hour is preferable for the seasoning to properly burn in.
    Charcoal grills work well for this because you can add more charcoal to them after you cook your food, doesnt take much 8-10 pieces.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    New England
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    "Re-season utensil after cooking acidic foods, such as beans or tomatoes"

    I wondered if it was safe to cook acidic things in cast iron. I was told not to in aluminum and questioned cast iron. Now I know.

    Lobo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    N.E. Oklahoma
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    A sheet of aluminum foil crumpled up in a ball makes a perfect scrubber for cleaning your cast iron. Use a pair of tongs to hold it with because it will get hot quick. I learned that as a girl scout leader and it works great.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2010
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    Midwest
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    I've cooked a ton of acidic foods in cast aluminium dutch ovens. Never had an issue.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    cooking acidic foods in cast iron can actually be beneficial as the acidic foods pull iron from the pots/pans into the food. No worries about getting anemic if you use cast iron regularly.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by OscarMike View Post
    I've cooked a ton of acidic foods in cast aluminium dutch ovens. Never had an issue.
    the concern isn't for the cookware its for the risk of ingesting too much aluminum in your food.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    If I am correct... don't studies say that aluminum is a possible cause of Alzheimer's? Aside it is a heavy metal...and may cause problem other than just Alzheimer's

  10. #10
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    Sep 2009
    Location
    Phoenix
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    Quote Originally Posted by raggi5 View Post
    If I am correct... don't studies say that aluminum is a possible cause of Alzheimer's? Aside it is a heavy metal...and may cause problem other than just Alzheimer's
    There is some indication that it is involved with the formation of the plaque that affects the neurons in the brains of Alheimers sufferers.

    Aluminum isn't a heavy metal, but also is NOT needed in our bodies as iron is. Cooking in cast iron HAS been shown to add iron to your diet. This may be beneficial if you lack iron in your diet. Cooking in aluminum can add aluminum to your diet. We trashed our aluminum years ago and use cast iron and enameled cast iron for the most part.

    Also, if you make soup or stew in your cast iron, it is wise to reseason it. The combo of liquid and heat tends to remove the seasoning to some degree just as excessive heat can. The same holds true for a steel wok. They can be real boogers to keep the seasoning on.

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