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Thread: Aussie Aussie Aussie Oi Oi Oi

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by runtis View Post
    In regards to weapons I don't have a gun but I have knives. Americans have it easy with guns. I am thinking of getting a compound bow (did archery as a school sport) and sling shots. I would like a gun and will look into the suggestions here but I think having weapons that don't make as much noise as a gun are also a good idea. Also I am afraid I'll accidentally shoot my own face off.
    I want to get a compound bow too, that's the only thin you can get without a license these days, although they may ban that too in the future, they ban everything. There's no way you can catch a kangaroo on foot, you can get fairly close to them, within firing range, but they can dart off really quickly. I found if you approach slowly and keep low, without standing up fully, they will look at you but they won't get spooked so easily. I'm looking at second hand bows on ebay, I'm typing the words, compound hunting bow as keywords.

    I'm going to buy lots of multivitamins to cover anything that my body maybe missing. Multivitamins are good if you're only eating a restricted variety of food. Protein powder is good too, in addition to the cans and dehydrated food, preferably if it has vitamins added to it.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Michigan
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    543

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    Hi From over the pond in Michigan USA. Got some questions on the canned butter (and the canned cheese) I see being offered on-line.
    Does anyone currently use it? How is it and how long will the cans last if stored in cool dark area? I'm considering getting a few cases of that and the canned cheese I see but am leery on the "shelf-life" for my preps. Appreciate anything you can tell me about it.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Armidale, New England NSW
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    52

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    Just a quick note to say that our group's forum address has changed. It is now at: http://eighteenthcenturylivinghistory.freeforums.org/
    And for any 18th century survival info, my blog at: http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/
    My primitive skills video channel is at: http://www.youtube.com/user/historic...g?feature=mhum
    The forum address is wrong on this video, but it does give you a quick look at some of the stuff we do.

  4. #34
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    Sep 2009
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    Armidale, New England NSW
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    Have any of you made plans in regards to going it alone or as part of a group?

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    28

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    i'm part of a group , there'll be good folks caught out not knowing what to do , and even whats happening , just had the sense to high tail it . these folks need help and so we've organised "scouts" folks who can spot these folks , wise em up fast before they become victims and if ok send em along to others

    me personally , if need can hit the scrub long term alone , but not everyones like that so as its a society we are talking about preserving , its best not done in a vacum.., i know folks will say its a bad idea, you'll get spotted etc , but what do you do ?

    many will be like earlier posters in this thread , family folks , city folks , no real outdoors experience without all the gear

    if they aint lefty parasites , do what you can to save em , help em , we'll need em later on to take the place back too ..
    Last edited by Jack404; 11-30-2012 at 08:06 PM.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Loup View Post

    Do not underestimate the usefulness of a muzzle-loading gun. My flintlock fusil is my number one choice for long term wilderness survival. Percussion guns are easier to use but need little caps for the ignition, a more modern form than the flintlock. If you need more info just ask.
    Regards.
    What is the key reason for this? Does your choice focus purely on hunting say as opposed to all SHTF scenarios?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Armidale, New England NSW
    Posts
    52

    Default Muzzle-Loader v Breech-Loader

    Quote Originally Posted by kz7 View Post
    What is the key reason for this? Does your choice focus purely on hunting say as opposed to all SHTF scenarios?
    If I was travelling alone, & had to choose between a modern firearm & my muzzle-loader, I would choose the muzzle-loader. If I am in a group, then modern firearms would be carried for purely defence.
    Advantages Of A Flintlock Muzzle-loader.
    1) Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent calibre firearm.
    2) The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies).
    3) The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.
    4) You can vary the load if needs be.
    5) The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.
    6) Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.
    7) You can make your own gunpowder.
    You can use the lock to make fire without the need for gunpowder.
    9) You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.
    10) IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely)you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.
    11) If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.
    12) You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.
    13) Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.
    14) Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.
    15) Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of calibre (only NSW is looking at this legislation at present).
    16) A .32 calibre flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .32 LR, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks.
    17) Damage from a .62 calibre-.75 calibre pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.
    1 By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.
    19) There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.
    20) Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.


    Keith.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    31

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    Hi Keith

    Thanks for that detailed explanation. I have seen some videos of Dave Canterbury suggesting a single barrel 12g and adapters for say .22 as well as being able to go down the black powder route by using the base of shot gun cartridges. Not sure what the regs are north of the Tweed but it something that piques my interest. Most of what you do is very interesting and an area that I haven't explored too much. Can you convert a percussion to a flintlock? There seems to be a few second hand percussion guns on the Aussie sites but only a small range. Do most import? I would definitely like to learn more.

  9. #39
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    Sep 2009
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    Armidale, New England NSW
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    Quote Originally Posted by kz7 View Post
    Hi Keith

    Thanks for that detailed explanation. I have seen some videos of Dave Canterbury suggesting a single barrel 12g and adapters for say .22 as well as being able to go down the black powder route by using the base of shot gun cartridges. Not sure what the regs are north of the Tweed but it something that piques my interest. Most of what you do is very interesting and an area that I haven't explored too much. Can you convert a percussion to a flintlock? There seems to be a few second hand percussion guns on the Aussie sites but only a small range. Do most import? I would definitely like to learn more.
    Some percussion guns have what is called a "snail", this is a part of the barrel & can not be removed. It is also the part that the percussion nipple screws into. These can not be converted to flintlock.
    Most percussions though are drum & nipple, this is a drum that screws into the barrel. This can be easily removed & replaced with a screw in liner. Then you fit a flint lock & you are in business.
    Most muzzle-loading guns are now imported by the dealers. Even those that build their own, import the parts.
    Regards, Keith.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Louisiana
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    2,671

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    I happen to be an overseas affiliate of LeLoup here. I would have to say that he is underplaying his experience here on our humble forum. Where most people speculate about bugging out and living off the land, LeLoup can impart stories of how he went about it, and how he equipped himself better the next time.

    That said, I always jump into the middle of "archaic weapons" discussions by throwing in a few more that are legal almost anywhere. I personally carry a bola with me in all of my kits. 2 1/2 foot of cord, wrapped around a 1" metal nut on one end, tied on the other in a bundle of three. Easy to learn how to use, very effective at ensnaring almost all sizes of game if it has room to spin into it, and makes for a less lethal attack option for fleeing opponents or disorganizing a group of attackers. Even useful in hand to hand.

    I follow that up with a sling. Not a sling shot. With training, you can easily take out small and medium sized game fairly withing shot range. Ammo can be scavenged easily, made easily from numerous materials when not readily available, and they weight nothing.

    One of my loves is archery. I wish it was cheap enough to fully embrace they way I want it to be, but I am working on that. I always suggest wood bows when you can get them, and takedown bows are awesome. Quiet, customizable, hard hitting. With practice, you can use a bow in the same range as a shotgun slug or thereabouts. My suggestions, shtf, to get the most out of an archery set. Get a bow either without an arrow rest or shelf, or else wise get a bow with two, so that you can shoot it with either hand. Traditionally, almost every culture in the world shoots from a hip mounted quiver. I recommend a European style, canvas bag held open with a metal hoop below the fletching, that can be closed over the top of them with a draw string closure. This allows for a rapid, easy carrying follow up shot potential. You are either going to have to make or alter arrows so that the heads to not have sharp angles along the edges, and they snag when returning to the quiver or when drawing out the arrows. You can have points for everything from setting fires to hunting birds. I feel like I should add at this point a statement about draw weights. Most compound bow shooters I know will tell you less that 70-150lbs, a bow cannot kill much of anything. In a wood bow, those are war bow weights of draw, capable of throwing a spiked 1/2" rod 32" long into a sheet of steel. I can legally hunt whitetail deer(100-200Lb average weight in my area) with a 30lb bow and broadheads in excess of 1" width. 55lb recurves are fully legal for black bear where it is legal to hunt one, and an old Archery Great once killed an elephant with a 55lb recurve and a specially made broadhead, with a single shot. Food for thought.

    I have been trying to follow LeLoups advice with a muzzleloader, as they have a number of serious advantages once you have the working of them down pat. The only one that I currently have working is a reproduction Colt Navy(the not working part being largely errors on my part. No guidance at the time). Probably the most accurate pistol I own, almost no recoil. I used to have a Remington New Army reproduction that I mistakenly made a habit of shooting triple charges of powder out of, and even it was easy on recoil on my end. Be sure to get the correct powder, and for the love of all that is holy, clean them in a timely manner. I will say that in my experience, you teach a man to appreciate a so called "inferior" firearm, he has a tendency to do a lot better when switching to a more modern styled firearm, should the need arise. Getting used to only having one shot makes you treat shooting a lot differently.

    Hope y'all don't mind my throwing my two cents in.
    Last edited by Archaic Weapon; 11-06-2013 at 10:46 PM.

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