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Thread: Long Term Storage Rice Beans etc.

  1. #11
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    Apr 2009
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    I did the mylar bag/oxygen absorber thing for about 50 lb of rice and 20 lb of pasta. Planning on doing a bunch of beans too.

    It is interesting to see the 'vacuum packed' look of the bags after the O2 absorbers do their thing.

    Here's a question: saw some sealed up buckets of wheat at Costco the other day. (Whole wheat that you would have to grind yourself) Can you just buy one of these and toss it on the shelf or would it need to be broken open and repackaged in order to keep long term? I examined one in the store but couldn't find out how it was sealed up or what the interior packing was.

    Also, once you open a pack of absorbers do they lose their potency as they suck the O2 out of the ambient air? I noticed when I finished my last round of bagging that my unused O2 absorbers were actually getting warm to the touch. I sealed them back away but I worried about them becoming unusable. Anyone have the skinny on this?

  2. #12
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    Aug 2008
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    Free Republic of North Georgia
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    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product...=1&topnav=&s=1


    I just bought 10 cases of these from Costco. Free shipping. Seemed like a good deal for the number of servings, the shelf life and no work involved...
    Preservation of Dal al-Harb - in the wastelands of the former United States.

  3. #13
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    Some people believe that O2 absorbers actually "absorb" the oxygen inside mylar bags. To my understanding, and I have had plenty of practice, having sealed my own buckets for several years now, you don't get a "vaccuum sealed" look every time. It depends on how much air you push out of the bag to begin with. I always leave some to prevent the "vaccuum sealed" look 'cause if the mylar is firmly against the food, depending on what it is, you could end up with a punctured bag (example-macaroni or spaghetti). Just because 'cause the bag isn't drawn down to the food doesn't mean that the bag contains oxygen. The O2 "absorbers" converts the oxygen to NITROGEN, an inert gas that is harmless to food. And also, Zack Attack, I have always read and heard that the O2 absorbers have a very short life once you open them; about 15 minutes. That's why you should always reseal them as quickley as possible.I have devoted a lot of time to internet research on this, so as far as I know, my information is right. I hope this information helps and if anyone finds a better way to successfully store food for longterm, please let us know.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angie View Post
    I broke my rice, sugar and salt down into half gallon canning jars with oxygen absorbers. It works great and is less fiddly than mylar bags.
    IF you store sugar or salt in florida....they might turn into a rock
    IF your rock in in a glass jar....it is hard to break up and use
    IF you must use a jar....use a plastic container...you can hit it with a hammer...break the block...cut the plastic
    YOU must keep salt and sugar in an air tight container.
    IN florida....in a high humidity area....a paper bag of sugar will absorb enough water to run down the wall in less than a year (bugs and rats, mice will eat paper and sugar)
    I store 8 4 pound paper bags in a 5 gal plastic bucket with an airtight lid....if it goes HARD i can still pull a bag out and break it up with a hammer.....run it through a flour sifter ....after i get 2/3 of it nice for the wife...i leave the other third as little rocks i use in coffee.
    THE NEXT STEP UP would ,might, be a 55 gal steel drum, still must be airtight
    AMMO CANS work great

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by john316 View Post
    IF you store sugar or salt in florida....they might turn into a rock
    IF your rock in in a glass jar....it is hard to break up and use
    IF you must use a jar....use a plastic container...you can hit it with a hammer...break the block...cut the plastic
    YOU must keep salt and sugar in an air tight container.
    IN florida....in a high humidity area....a paper bag of sugar will absorb enough water to run down the wall in less than a year (bugs and rats, mice will eat paper and sugar)
    I store 8 4 pound paper bags in a 5 gal plastic bucket with an airtight lid....if it goes HARD i can still pull a bag out and break it up with a hammer.....run it through a flour sifter ....after i get 2/3 of it nice for the wife...i leave the other third as little rocks i use in coffee.
    THE NEXT STEP UP would ,might, be a 55 gal steel drum, still must be airtight
    AMMO CANS work great

    found a really stinky zombie posting to reply to >>>> sugar & salt caking up is a problem just about everywhere - both are cheap $$$ and vital enough to store in as a large quantity as possible - salt/sugar are "forever" food storage products with no rotation necessary - just keep the pests and contamination out and worry about pulverizing later ....

  6. #16
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    Mar 2009
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    Yep. Using desiccants may help, but some people add rice to salt and sugar and filter out the rice when extracting a quantity for home use.
    Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference. Gladius Republicae!
    "...use Gold like it's gunpowder..."

  7. #17
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    Oct 2009
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    Lapland, TN
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    "Prepper Series - How to Dry Can Beans and Rice"



    Skarecrow.

  8. #18
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    May 2011
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    Thanks for that Skarecrow. Here's one on canning cheese. Never knew you could can cheese.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQo29wCbS8M

  9. #19
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    Thanks for that Skarecrow. Here's one on canning cheese. Never knew you could can cheese.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQo29wCbS8M
    Interesting video. I'd suggest the author have her cholesterol checked
    =
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Lapland, TN
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    I suspect she's storing the foodstuffs away for a time when cholesterol will be the least of her worries.

    Skarecrow.

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