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Thread: First aid Numbing agent?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    North Florida
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    61

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    There is a method of application for blocks, and if you are doing anything on a hand or foot you with need lidocaine without, again WITHOUT, epinephrin in it. If you use the stuff with epi in it, you might as well cut off the closest digit.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by graffixx808 View Post
    liquid lidocaine use syringe just under the skin
    I would avoid anything injectable unless you really know how to use it. As in the post above, lidocaine with epinephrine in it will decrease the bleeding, but if used near a finger or toe, might result in loss of circulation to that area.

    Best to stick with topical stuff if you're not medically trained.

    There is a viscous lidocaine jelly that you can use topically. You need to be careful if using it over large areas (burns and such) since absorption might be variable and lidocaine has it's own side effects.

  3. #23
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    Dec 2008
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    Arkansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrBob View Post
    I would avoid anything injectable unless you really know how to use it. As in the post above, lidocaine with epinephrine in it will decrease the bleeding, but if used near a finger or toe, might result in loss of circulation to that area.

    Best to stick with topical stuff if you're not medically trained.

    There is a viscous lidocaine jelly that you can use topically. You need to be careful if using it over large areas (burns and such) since absorption might be variable and lidocaine has it's own side effects.
    Can't agree more.

    There are several lido creams used for waxing bikini lines etc. available at most beauty supply stores. Apply to area to be numbed and wrap with saran wrap, it will be most effective if you can leave this on for 30 - 50 mins. If you can get it LMX (ElaMax) or Emla cream are best, they are both at least 5% lido and are used in medical clinics every day. Use with caution if you have low blood pressure or a heart condition.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    210

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    I know I'm gonna get flamed for this and it is illegal but in an EOTWAWKI situation I guess that wont matter. Find a coke dealers house and take his cocaine. Sprinkle some in the cut your gonna suture.

  5. #25
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    Jan 2008
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    peoples republik of kalifornia
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    don't know your views on such things but in an emergency situatiion-coke. might be easier to obtain than medical/Rx stuff. don't want to open the just say no can of worms here.

  6. #26
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    Jun 2009
    Location
    NM
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    62

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrBob View Post
    I would avoid anything injectable unless you really know how to use it. As in the post above, lidocaine with epinephrine in it will decrease the bleeding, but if used near a finger or toe, might result in loss of circulation to that area.

    Best to stick with topical stuff if you're not medically trained.

    There is a viscous lidocaine jelly that you can use topically. You need to be careful if using it over large areas (burns and such) since absorption might be variable and lidocaine has it's own side effects.
    As far as lido with epi remember, NEVER use on fingers, toes, nose, or hose.

    If you are trained, in a pinch you can use normal saline WITH preservative. Just use in the same manner as lido, WARNING, much shorter anesthetic time.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    arizona
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    16

    Wink was searching the web and found this

    Wounds: Numbing a wound, when one has liquid Benadryl or Diphenhydramine, one can pour that on a 4 x 4 bandage and apply it to the wound. It will act as a nice mild anesthesia which will numb the area.
    also found that you can dilute codeine derivative tablets in water and inject into wound to numb wounds.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    rural/upstate New York
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    oragel for small areas... ice for larger ones.
    "Friendly Fire, isn't".

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    georgia
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    Since no one else has addressed this issue I guess I will. There's more to it than you think.
    How many people have actually sewn (sutured) themselves up. I (and I am sure there are a few here as well) have , it is neither easy nor fun.
    Try fighting off the effects of blood loss and shock while trying to prep the wound for repair as well as doing the actual suturing.
    In a lot of cases where a sub dermal or intramuscular or vascular repairs are not needed a simple compression type bandage or wrap is all that is needed to close many cuts until the wound knits back on its own. Steri strips , medical grade (even over the counter in a pinch) super glue , even duct tape all work in closing wounds without the added trauma of trying to suture up a wound.
    There are many different types of suture material and techniques used (and often needed) to close up wounds on various parts of the body.An example being a cut on the arm can be closed with one technique while a head or neck wound will require yet another and a jagged rip on the hand yet another.
    Simply closing up the skin on a deep wound is not going to be enough to ensure a proper repair.
    So unless you are properly and thoroughly trained in more than just advanced first aide the best thing that can be done is to clean the wound , control the bleeding , close the wound with a non invasive technique , stabilize the wound (if on a limb) to prevent reopening the wound , begin a regiment of antibiotics if available or use topical antibiotic cream once the wound has been closed.

    If the wound is more severe and anything more than simple closure is needed then a topical numbing agent just isn't going to cut it and a proper repair will be beyond basic suturing skills.

    just my .02 worth there based on a fair degree of personal experience (accident prone growing up) and some knowledge.
    Keep your powder dry.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    arizona
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    16

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    Quote Originally Posted by YSOCREUS View Post
    oragel for small areas... ice for larger ones.
    thank god my mom is a nurse, she is very good at that stuff, you have a point on suturing though if alone or with untrained people, sometimes it is better to just get the blood under control and let nature go to work, the body knows more about fixing itself than any doctor will ever know.

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