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Thread: Possible EMP Alert from NK

  1. #11
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    After China and all 14 other countries voting for sanctions and saying he's on his own if he fired first I don't think he will do anything. He knows he will be wiped off the face of this rock

    Like I've said before. He just wants street cred. I think he has it now
    I tend to agree, but on the other hand ruthless dictators who don't cotton to disagreements from subordinates live in an echo chamber where those loyal lieutenants tell the nut case what he want's to hear. Remember Saddam personally executing one of his senior staff right in a staff meeting? for telling Saddam that the US really would win? or Stalin doing the same to those generals that told him that Germany really was going to invade Russia? You know - the old Emperor has no clothes story.

    Prudence says take him at his word and prepare accordingly. Then be pleasantly surprised and relieved.

    But he doesn't have to be able to fire an ICBM from NK to do the job. Put one in an old 727 cargo jet and detonate at 40,000 over LA, or smuggle one in a container ship and launch from 20 miles out, etc etc.

    I tend to agree that he doesn't have the ability to launch multiple ICBMs of sufficient power to achieve a total EMP coverage of CONUS, but pop off even a small one over San Fran or Philadelphia and there will be a huge loss of life and the untouched areas of the country will go into a complete panic.

    to wit:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starfish_Prime
    http://futurescience.com/emp/test184.html

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    There are an awful lot of if's involved with the statements in the video.
    And any nuke at the right altitude will produce an EMP effect. But the strength of the blast determines just how powerful the EMP and how far-reaching those effects go.
    I don't think anyone thinks North Korea has the capability to do any size mega-ton blast over the USA. Most think that IF they do have nukes small enough to fit in a missile the yield would only be at the very worst maybe 10 kiloton.
    I feel compelled to point out a small but important distinction in the statement above. It is not "strength of blast" that determines the intensity of the EMP produced. For decades the nuclear nations have had ways of tweaking nukes in special ways to achieve particular results. The hydrogen bomb was the first variation, which focused on creating a bigger blast. It was followed by others... most here will remember the neutron bomb which minimizes blast, but creates a deadly flash of neutron radiation fatal to human and animal life. The Russians did a lot of work on EMP during the cold war and are reported to have produced a low-yield variation that maximizes gama ray production, which is what actually generates tbe EMP when it strikes a certain layer of earth's upper atmosphere. It is believed the NK's may have somehow acquired those old blueprints. Using one of these EMP-optimized configurations, you can achieve a surprisingly large EMP effect from a much smaller yield device.

    If you listen to the interview the congressman actually mentions the optimized-for-gama-ray-production variant, and the belief that NK has or is developing these. They are believed to have between 30-60 warheads in their arsenal (different report). They can afford to spread them around.
    Last edited by bruss01; 08-14-2017 at 09:48 AM.
    In a crazy world, it's the crazy man who can get by - and it's about to get cray-cray up in here.

  3. #13
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    How's the saying go?
    Be professional
    Be polite
    And have a plan to kill them all ?
    Cry in training - laugh in battle

  4. #14
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    Having had a chance to think things over, from KJU's point of view there may seem to be a sort of "poetic justice" to an EMP attack and again from his pov a certain moral high-ground.

    It's no secret that for years, probably decades, the US has led efforts to sanction NK for their nuclear ambitions (among other things). This has led to significant domestic problems for them, including food shortages and other shortages/problems, resulting in an economy and a national infrastructure that is decades behind most civilized nations. Of course, that is the whole point of sanctions, to bring pressure and hopefully motivate a change of policy. Of course if you're the stubborn type things just get more and more difficult over time.

    It would not be surprising if KJU blamed the American president for these troubles (projection) but also realizing that presidents change every 4-8 years, may harbor a grudge against those who put those presidents into office, the American people.

    Of course he knows if he blows up a city, directly killing US citizens, he'll not get a pass on that by the UN, it'll be war in no uncertain terms and NK loses badly.

    BUT -

    I'm sure if his experts told him one day that with just a few properly placed "space bursts" he could not kill a single American directly, never set foot on US soil and never impinge on US waters or air-space, but could cripple the US level of tech infrastructure the way his own nation's has been crippled by sanctions... that might sound very appealing to him. And he could then stand back and watch Americans killing each other over a gallon of gas, a loaf of bread or a can of chili. He can look over at China saying "What? Me never touch them..." and who will China side with at that point? Larger question, what opportunities would such an event present for other global adversaries and competitors of the US? It's been said "Never let a crisis go to waste" and every opportunist on the planet will be elbowing in to get their piece of the pie. A lot of things the US has been managing or handling globally might fall under BRICS, Russian, Chinese or EU dominion, as the US is compelled to focus on dealing with issues domestically. In their eyes, maybe KJU did them a "favor" by giving the US bigger things to worry about, for a while at least. Talk about a "diversion"!

    Tit for tat - you cripple my economy and infrastructure... let's see how you like it, round-eye...

    He might then offer insulting commentary on how despite their hardships, the NK citizens never rioted or slaughtered each other in such a fashion, no matter how dire their plight... of course leaving out that the country practically lives under a perpetual version of martial law anyway. Unfortunately the only way of getting rioting and looting under control in the US will be imposition of some form of militarized order - "martial law" though it may not be called that - it won't be politically motivated as some have long feared, it'll be needed just to ensure supplies and commodities go where they are needed. About the 3rd grocery truck coming into town that gets hijacked, or the 4th gasoline tanker, by black-market profiteers looking to make a killing, and people will be SCREAMING for the national guard or SOMEBODY to get in there and provide order and protection. It'll be a practical and necessary measure. Again, KJU sees American citizens living in hunger, privation and military oppression... and smiles in whatever bunker he is holed up in. That's a chilling and infuriating thought.

    The continuing taunts out of NK threatening the US are worrying. It would appear they are trying to goad our leadership into some kind of hostile action so that NK can then strike back "in self defense". So far US diplomacy has consisted of "sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me". Maybe KJU hopes that eventually patience will run out and someone will act hastily to their everlasting regret. "He hit me first..."

    Not sympathizing with KJU in the least here, but to understand what an enemy is likely to do, you have to try to understand how they think because thoughts predicate actions. Based on the forgoing reasoning, it's easy to see how NK may have motivation to use an EMP attack if the right trigger or flash-point presents itself. Let's hope that cooler heads prevail on all sides and no one acts impulsively, because with tensions at an all-time high, one wrong step could send things down a path that none of us will forget.
    Last edited by bruss01; 08-17-2017 at 12:07 PM.
    In a crazy world, it's the crazy man who can get by - and it's about to get cray-cray up in here.

  5. #15
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    EMP's are the holy grail of preppers. And an EMP is easy to talk about and say how terrible the effects would be. It is easy because an EMP has never been used against another country. And there are many conflicting reports about what damage it would actually do. Yes the USA did a test 50 years ago using the biggest nuke we had and lofted and exploded at the perfect altitude for maximum effect. But that was over 50 years ago.
    As far as North Korea, there is zero proof that they have any kind of nuke that would fit in one of their missiles. Only supposition that they might have. It is the same with their ICBM capability. So far they have shot off two and they traveled a few hundred miles. And from that some have guessed that the North's ICBM's could travel as far as someplace in the USA. Again it is only supposition. No proof.
    And if they do have a nuke that fits in a missile and if that missile could travel to the USA and still be able to have an altitude of two hundred miles or so to produce an EMP effect, it would be small scale. The North only has small 5 to 15 kiloton nukes.
    When North Korea does perfect an ICBM with adequate range and payload capacity And they perfect a megaton fusion nuke that fits in that ICBM, I think he will launch. That might be next year or the year after or possibly never.

  6. #16
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    after reading Once Second After or is it One Minute After I felt more skeered about an emp attack that nuclear devastation. was talking about it last weekend with a fellow I met and he only responded with.. God is bigger than anything we can be hit with , we just have to trust him before during and after.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
    EMP's are the holy grail of preppers. And an EMP is easy to talk about and say how terrible the effects would be. It is easy because an EMP has never been used against another country. And there are many conflicting reports about what damage it would actually do. Yes the USA did a test 50 years ago using the biggest nuke we had and lofted and exploded at the perfect altitude for maximum effect. But that was over 50 years ago.
    As far as North Korea, there is zero proof that they have any kind of nuke that would fit in one of their missiles. Only supposition that they might have. It is the same with their ICBM capability. So far they have shot off two and they traveled a few hundred miles. And from that some have guessed that the North's ICBM's could travel as far as someplace in the USA. Again it is only supposition. No proof.
    And if they do have a nuke that fits in a missile and if that missile could travel to the USA and still be able to have an altitude of two hundred miles or so to produce an EMP effect, it would be small scale. The North only has small 5 to 15 kiloton nukes.
    When North Korea does perfect an ICBM with adequate range and payload capacity And they perfect a megaton fusion nuke that fits in that ICBM, I think he will launch. That might be next year or the year after or possibly never.
    EditWatch this pageRead in another language
    List of North Korean missile tests
    There have been a number of North Korean missile tests. North Korea has also fired a number of short-range missiles into the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea), in what have been interpreted as political gestures.[1][2][3][4]

    Contents
    Timeline Edit

    This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.
    1976–81 – North Korea commences its missile development program using Scud-B from the Soviet Union and a launchpad from Egypt.[5]
    1984 - First Scud-B missile test firing.[5]
    1988 - Operational deployment of Scud-B and Scud-C missiles.[5]
    1990 - First Rodong missile test.[5]
    1993 North Korean missile test - (May 29/30, 1993) - Nodong
    1998 - North Korea fires off its first ballistic missile, the Unha-1 rocket, also known as the Taepodong-1 missile, from the launch site of Musudan-ri in North Hamgyong Province.[6]
    1999 - North Korea agrees to a moratorium on long-range missile tests.[7]
    2002 - North Korea pledges to extend moratorium on missile tests beyond 2003.
    2004 - North Korea reaffirms moratorium.[8]
    2005 - North Korea fires short-range missile into Sea of Japan.[9]
    2006 North Korean missile test - (July 5, 2006) - Taepodong-2 failed [6]
    2009 - Failed orbit of the Kwangmyongsong-2 satellite aboard an Unha-2 carrier rocket (April 5, 2009)
    2009 North Korean missile test (July 4, 2009)
    2012 - Failed launch of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 satellite aboard an Unha-3 carrier rocket (April 13, 2012)
    2012 - Successful launch of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-3 Unit 2 satellite aboard a three stage rocket (December 12, 2012)[6]
    2013 North Korean missile tests (May 18–20, 2013 - part of 2013 Korean crisis)
    2014 North Korean missile tests (March 2014) including Nodong, success[10]
    2015- North Korea claims to launch a missile from a submarine (May 2015)[11][6]
    2016 - Successful launch of the Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 satellite (Feb. 7, 2016)
    2016 - Test of engine designed for an intercontinental ballistic missile (April, 2016)[12]
    2016 - North Korea claims to launch a Pukkuksong-1[13] missile capable of striking the United States (August 2016).[14] The missile is a Submarine-launched ballistic missile.[14]
    2016 - Failed North Korean ballistic missile launch (Oct 15, 2016)- [15]
    2016 – Failed launch of an intermediate-range missile (October 19, 2016)[16]
    2017 – North Korea test-fired a Pukguksong-2 missile over the Sea of Japan. This was the first launch of the new medium-range ballistic missile (February 11, 2017).[17][18][6]
    2017 – North Korea launches four ballistic missiles from the Tongchang-ri launch site in the northwest.[19] Some flew 620 mi (1,000 km) before falling into the Sea of Japan. (March 6, 2017)[20][6]
    2017 – North Korea test-fired a medium-range ballistic missile from its eastern port of Sinpo into the Sea of Japan (April 4, 2017)[21][22][6]
    2017 – North Korea test-fired an unidentified land-based missile from the naval base in Sinpo but it exploded almost immediately after the takeoff (April 15, 2017).[23][24][25][26]
    2017 - North Korea test-fired an unidentified missile from Pukchang airfield (April 28, 2017).[27][28] Missile, believed to be a medium-range[29] KN-17 ballistic missile,[27] falters and breaks apart minutes after liftoff.[29][30]
    2017 - North Korea test-fired a Hwasong-12[31] missile from a test site in the area of Kusong (May 13, 2017).[32] The missile, later revealed to be an intermediate range ballistic missile,[33] traveled 30 minutes,[34] reached an altitude of more than 2,111.5 km, and flew a horizontal distance of 789 km (489 miles), before falling into the Sea of Japan.[33] Such a missile would have a range of at least 4,000, reaching Guam, to 6,000 km.[32][31]
    2017- North Korea test-fired another Pukguksong-2 medium-range ballistic missile from Pukchang airfield (May 21, 2017),[35][36] which traveled approximately 300 miles before falling into the Sea of Japan.[37] The missile landed about 217 miles from North Korea's east coast.[37]
    2017 - North Korea Fired a Short Range Ballistic Missile into the Sea of Japan (May 29, 2017). It traveled 450 km.[38]
    2017 - North Korea fired several missiles into the Sea of Japan (June 8, 2017). They are believed to be anti-ship missiles.[39] The South Korean military said the launches show the reclusive regime's "precise targeting capability."
    2017 - North Korea tested a new rocket engine that could possibly be fitted to an intercontinental ballistic missile (June 23, 2017).[40]
    2017 – North Korea tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) named Hwasong-14 on July 4.[41][42] It launched from the Panghyon Aircraft Factory 8 km southeast of Panghyon Airport.[43] It was aimed straight up at a lofted trajectory and reached more than 2,500 km into space.[44] It landed 37 minutes later,[45] more than 930 km from its launch site,[46] into Japan's exclusive economic zone.[47] Aiming long, the missile would have traveled 7,000-8,000 km or more, reaching Alaska, Hawaii, and maybe Seattle.[45][48][49][50][51] Its operational range would be farther, bringing a 500 kg payload to targets in most of the contiguous United States 9,700 km away.[52][53][54]
    2017- The 14th missile test carried out by North Korea in 2017 was another ICBM launched at 23:41 North Korea time (15:41 GMT) from Chagang Province in the north of the country on July 28, 2017. Los Angeles, Denver, Chicago, Boston, and New York appear to be within range.[55] The missile's reentry vehicle (RV) was seen by people in Japan as it entered the atmosphere and landed near the northernmost Japanese island, Hokkaido.[56][57] Analysis later revealed that the RV broke up on re-entry; further testing would be required.[58] The CIA made an assessment expecting adequate performance of the RV under the different stresses of a shallower trajectory towards the continental US.[59]
    2016 events Edit
    On February 7, 2016, roughly a month after an alleged hydrogen bomb test, North Korea claimed to have put a satellite into low Earth orbit. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe had warned the North to not launch the rocket, and if it did and the rocket violated Japanese territory, it would be shot down. Nevertheless, North Korea launched the rocket anyway, claiming the satellite was purely intended for peaceful, scientific purposes. Several nations, including the United States, Japan, and South Korea, have criticized the launch, and despite North Korean claims that the rocket was for peaceful purposes, it has been heavily criticized as an attempt to perform an ICBM test under the guise of a peaceful satellite launch. China also criticized the launch, however urged "the relevant parties" to "refrain from taking actions that may further escalate tensions on the Korean peninsula".[60]

    While some North Korean pronouncements have been treated with skepticism and ridicule, analysts treated the unusual pace of North Korean rocket and nuclear testing in early 2016 quite seriously. Admiral Bill Gortney, head of the North American Aerospace Defense Command, told Congress in March 2016, "It's the prudent decision on my part to assume that [Kim Jong Un] has the capability to miniaturize a nuclear weapon and put it on an ICBM," suggesting a major shift from a few years earlier.[61]

    North Korea appeared to launch a missile test from a submarine on 23 April 2016; while the missile only traveled 30 km, one U.S. analyst noted that "North Korea's sub launch capability has gone from a joke to something very serious".[62] North Korea conducted multiple missile tests in 2016.[63]


    Edit

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    Remember what Einstein said:
    “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

  8. #18

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    While this is very frightening and true, in my own opinion, I believe God gave us the knowledge and ability to pick and initiate our achievements as well as our battles.

    Quote Originally Posted by silvergramma View Post
    after reading Once Second After or is it One Minute After I felt more skeered about an emp attack that nuclear devastation. was talking about it last weekend with a fellow I met and he only responded with.. God is bigger than anything we can be hit with , we just have to trust him before during and after.
    Last edited by Camouflaged; 08-17-2017 at 02:33 PM.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

  9. #19
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    Had a stranger tell me today, God puts the leaders in place good or bad. I've always said God has a sense of humor. During times of hardship and emergency the guys in black helicopters do "clean up" those who take advantage. There was a lot of "clean up" after Katrina..........
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    List of North Korean missile tests
    Yes just like I said above.

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