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Thread: For you Texicans a restaurant/portion/ steak question....???

  1. #11

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    lol, I didn't say "only from" but they were predominantly from those two states that fought beside the Texans. And now days, unless you are of Mexican decent, calling a Tex-Mexican " Tejano " is almost an insult for those with the PC attitude.
    You can hardly get away with calling a Native American an Indian or a red skin without offending them. More PC crap.
    jnr, I'm not contradicting you. I'm just letting you know. Both of my parents were born and raised on the reservation here in Texas and I spent most of my upbringing on the res. Both of my great-grandfathers and grandfathers fought in those wars. I'm 65 yrs old. I've lived all over Texas all my entire life and I'm a huge Texas history buff because of my Native American heritage. I speak the three languages fluently. There was a time in my upbringing, on both sides of my family we had 5 living generations until my mid 20's. There is a lot of history told that isn't printed and some of it was told incorrectly or changed over the years.

    Quote Originally Posted by jnr0104 View Post
    Interesting!
    I have lived here 62 years, 35 miles from Corpus and have never heard Texican used much until about 9 years ago, Have always heard the folks call themselves Tejanos.(Texans of Mexican decent)
    Also, Here is the list of those on the field at San Jacinto, and those in the reserve force at Harrisburg http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org/Library/Veteran_Bios/. There were more than just people from Tennessee,and Kentucky. Example: Thomas O'Connor came straight to Texas from Ireland, was a nephew of James Power,and settled in the Power and Hewetson colony in 1834. I know quite a few of his decendants we all still live in Victoria and Refugio counties. Also Daniel O'Driscoll (ancestor on my dads side) came direct from Ireland to Texas, and George Webb ( my moms side) who came to Texas from La. but originally from NE, New York State. Thats just 3 that I actually have knowledge of, so I'm pretty sure they were all NOT from just 2 states. We still live on the ranch( added quite a bit since then) that was started by Daniel O'Driscoll , as do the O'Connors on land Thomas aquired.

    And OT, you can get large steaks or steaks served family style in many places throughout Texas, as well as many other states. We prefer to go to the local meat market and have steaks cut the way we want them,cooking them at home for family and friends rather than going to a cafe or steakhouse.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  2. #12
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    Feb 2009
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  3. #13
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    Dec 1969
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    I lost three family headed to Goliad to join Fannin, but were caught and killed by Mx Cavalry. Also had six from a family at San Jacinto. Father too old and youngest son too young to fight, were in supply, while four brothers fought. My family came to Texas in 1824 I think we have decided.Settled what is now Winters, Tx near Houston.

    I always referred to those fighting Mexico as Texicans. Many try to turn it into a race war, but yes Mexican citizens, some Indians, and help from the east fought Santa Anna. My protestant family, like all settlers to Texas were required to become Catholic and Mexican citizens. They were not fighting a race, but an overbearing guv that would not honor the Constitution of 1824 and, get this, tried gun confiscation, hence, "Come and Take It" which came from Gonzales in fall of 1835.

    Moving on, yes there are many German and Chek(sp) areas in Texas, and Castroville is Alsatian, and German/French region of France, I think. Yea, Goodfellow is San angelo, Randolph is NE San Antonio, and the steak house was probably Barn Door on New Braunfels St, but could also be Farmers Daughter, both good for a slab of cow.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  4. #14
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    lol, I didn't say "only from" but they were predominantly from those two states that fought beside the Texans. And now days, unless you are of Mexican decent, calling a Tex-Mexican " Tejano " is almost an insult for those with the PC attitude.
    You can hardly get away with calling a Native American an Indian or a red skin without offending them. More PC crap.
    jnr, I'm not contradicting you. I'm just letting you know. Both of my parents were born and raised on the reservation here in Texas and I spent most of my upbringing on the res. Both of my great-grandfathers and grandfathers fought in those wars. I'm 65 yrs old. I've lived all over Texas all my entire life and I'm a huge Texas history buff because of my Native American heritage. I speak the three languages fluently. There was a time in my upbringing, on both sides of my family we had 5 living generations until my mid 20's. There is a lot of history told that isn't printed and some of it was told incorrectly or changed over the years.
    I hate all this PC crap! Cami, I prefer to refer to "Native Americans" as Apache, Cherokee, Seminole...whatever nation they belong to, or address each one by his/her name. Anyone who finds "fault" with that needs a board up side their head. I'm very...VERY...short on patience with the PC crowd. Bunch of spineless slugs. I have a great fondness, respect and admiration for all of the Indian people. They are proud, independent, resourceful, brave people. And, although I have no written proof, I have been told ever since I was a wee lad that I have Indian blood coursing through my veins...either Cherokee or Seminole...not sure. As far as the term "redskin", I rather think it was term of mixed fear, respect and admiration for their fierceness add bravery in battle, not a slanderous term. Just my personal take on it. Any of the PC crown has a problem with that.......PISS ON'EM!
    Last edited by beowulf; 02-13-2017 at 10:35 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    1,875

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    LOL LOL LOL,.Beowulf..PC indeed!!

    In a small fishing village, on the coast of North Carolina, I ran into a young fisherman who was fascinated by collecting Indian stone arrowheads and spear points.


    He had a wonderful collection for which he was organizing in wooden and glass cases and some of the history behind them.


    But the most fascinating stone in his collection was a stone which, on first glance, appeared to be a large stone animal tooth.


    When you put it in your hand it fit perfectly the cup of your hand and on the other side had an indentation to perfectly fit your thumb.


    What he told me was that this stone was a very rare find compared to stone arrowheads and spear points of which he had many...and fine examples.


    This, he told me, was a stone which would have been passed down from mother to daughter...and was used by the women for scraping the hair off hides and preparing them for whatever the skins were destined to be used.

    Looking closely at the stone I asked myself how many hides would one have to scrape to get this shape...and curvature...and thumb print/indentation as well.

    This is the only stone I have ever seen as such and it stands out in my mind. It was also one of the most valuable in his collection.

    This young fisherman also told me many interesting factoids and trivia about the American Indians and their trade routes....up and down America and to points west.
    I found that to be fascinating as well. It seems that many of the tribes were in communication via these trade routes and knew of each other ...albeit at a slower pace than todays electronics and communications. And they could eventually get goods north and south as well as east and west.

    It was fascinating listening to the knowledge of this young fisherman...of many things one would not ordinarily find in today's history books.


    No use here for PC as well..but when I run across people such as this who know bits and pieces of history ..and even history they have lived..I am always receptive to such stories...and information's.


    Thanks,
    Orangetom
    Last edited by orangetom1999; 02-13-2017 at 10:53 AM.

  6. #16
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    TN mainly, on the road alot.
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    Awesome stuff here peeps!

    Prefer indigenous over name calling. We should be helping bring all the many nations together. It hasn't been done in a really long time.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    I have several stones that may be scrapers, but have one that's for sure a scraper, with the same indention o a side, and discolored where the thumb would go. My FIL has several drills, which are a rare find here, mainly because they are delicate and would break easily.

    And I've coined a new phrase to cover the fed good crowd, and it is no longer PC for politically correct, but LC for liberally correct, and they are the feel good crowd.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  8. #18

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    Beo and Chip,
    PC, or "LC" people and I have always lived on opposite ends of the chitty stick. I go out of my way to piss on them just to watch them freak out. "Sometimes, you have to SLAP them in the face, just to get their attention." It's the Indian blood I inherited and the only blood I have running through my veins.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  9. #19

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    Speaking of artifacts, I have a curio cabinet full of them. One in particular is a doll that belonged to my great grandmother, made by her father. The head, hands and feet were carved from a giant mushroom and the body from animal bone. The clothing, shoes and bobbles are from animal hide and dried flowers. It's in pristine condition. I have a pair of snake skin leggings and moccoccines and a few musical instruments as well. The doll my great great- grandfather made is my most prized possession though. I've been offered a lot of money for it from a collector but I won't sell.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    TN mainly, on the road alot.
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    Camo, any pics, like the oldies that are goodies!

    Being able to retain a history that is getting lost is important for our youth to not make the same mistakes in the future.

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