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Thread: For you Texicans a restaurant/portion/ steak question....???

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Default For you Texicans a restaurant/portion/ steak question....???

    Went with some friends to a restaurant this evening and they ordered steak..

    This triggered memories of living out west in Texas when my father was in the Air Force at Randolph Field just outside San Antonio.


    I remember as a youngster going to certain restaurants with my parents and Pop ordering a very large steak. I mean large here!! When it came to the table it was on a large platter...and Pop cut off a piece for everyone the steak was so large. There were six of us.


    I have not seen this done in a restaurant in many many years..since my parents leaving Texas for other assignments in the Air Force.


    Do they still serve steaks ..I am sure special order..in this manner and in restaurants out west??? It was enough to feed our family...and it sure was tasty. As I recall the fries and other sides came in large servings bowls/platters too.

    Do any of you recall getting steaks in this manner when you went out to eat with family and friends?? Do they still do this in certain restaurants??


    Thanks,
    Orangetom

  2. #2
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    It's probably a porter house usually close to two lbs of Tbone. I very much prefer my steak to any restaurant with the exception of a prime rib, I have yet to master that cut and it's too expensive for me to toy around with.
    Don't bring skittles to a gun fight.

  3. #3

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    Yes they do, OT. It's a nicely marbled and aged black angus ribeye steak. Hubs and I go to Pop's steak house in town and order one to go. Between he and I, we can eat on that one steak for three meals each. The steak with all the sides is $11.99. It's grilled on an huge open wood pit behind the steakhouse. That huge steak over laps the platter and is about 2" thick. This is black angus cattle country around where I live.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

  4. #4

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    Oh, and PS. WE ARE TEXANS. Not Texicans. Texicans are border town Mexicans. LOL
    Remember what Einstein said:
    “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    Oh, and PS. WE ARE TEXANS. Not Texicans. Texicans are border town Mexicans. LOL
    That's kinda what I was thinking as well.
    Prepare for the worst, hope for the best

  6. #6
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    By Ask History - Today we may know them simply as Texans, but deciding what to call the people living in Texas in the pre-Texas Revolution era was a matter of some confusion. According to an issue of the Telegraph and Texas Register published on November 7, 1835, various people used the terms Texans, Texonians, Texasians and TEXICANS, but: “We believe that, both by the Mexican and American residents of the country, the name commonly used is Texians.” Texas residents of Mexican descent, many of whom predated their Anglo neighbors, were more accurately known by the Spanish word “Tejano.”
    From the HANDBOOK OF TEXAS - TEXIAN. The term Texian is generally used to apply to a citizen of the Anglo-American section of the province of Coahuila and Texas or of the Republic of Texas. Texian was used in 1835 as part of the title of the Nacogdoches Texian and Emigrant's Guide. As president of the Republic, Mirabeau B. Lamar used the term to foster nationalism. Early colonists and leaders in the Texas Revolution, many of whom were influential during the Civil War and who were respected as elder statesmen well into the 1880s, used Texian in English and Texienne in French. However, in general usage after annexation, Texan replaced Texian. The Texas Almanac still used the term Texian as late as 1868.
    I know my family was here in the early 1800s,and we have letters from the time of the revolution from ancestors using the word Texians in those letters, two fought at San Jacinto in 1836.
    Last edited by jnr0104; 02-13-2017 at 06:22 AM.

  7. #7

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    Historically speaking, South/South East, the term "Texian" was common but, Native Texans are referred to as Texans. As a native born Texan and a Native American Indian from descendants born on the reservation in Texas, up unto and including my mother and father, the Term Texan was the verbiage to identify Texas born natives this side of the Rio Grande river.
    "Texican" was, and still is the identifier of border town Texans as Far South East Texas as San Antonio and parts of Corpus Christi. Read~"_ ©Texas History"🔚

    Also, in the book of Texas History, you'll find that the Battle of San Jacinto as well and the Alamo were fought by Native born Texas Mexicans, Tennesseeans and Kentuckians.
    Last edited by Camouflaged; 02-13-2017 at 06:53 AM.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

  8. #8
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    Apr 2016
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    Camouflaged,

    Thanks for this update.

    Yes they do, OT. It's a nicely marbled and aged black angus ribeye steak. Hubs and I go to Pop's steak house in town and order one to go. Between he and I, we can eat on that one steak for three meals each. The steak with all the sides is $11.99. It's grilled on an huge open wood pit behind the steakhouse. That huge steak over laps the platter and is about 2" thick. This is black angus cattle country around where I live.


    Was thinking after posting ...that this would happen mostly in local restaurants...verses the franchises so popular today. That is fine with me. I like supporting local restaurants and businesses..prefer to so do when I can. That is a good price for it too Camouflaged...and it sounds great too...smelling it in my mind!!

    Also thanks for the update on Texicans. I will remember that.



    My parents traveled to Texas and lived out of their RV for two years out of the Air Force base at San Angelo. Goodfellows as I recall the name. They liked that area. Makes me wonder if they revisited just such an local restaurant for steaks. I would take care of their home, grass etc, etc. here and forward their mail to them while they were out on the road. I was glad to do this for them in their retirement.

    I was also a bit surprised to learn that there is a significant German presence in Texas...old established German Communities who still speak German. My mother is educated in the olde High German..HochDeutsch I think it is called .. ..and would visit some of them and teach this High German. New Braunfels was the area as I recall my mother saying.

    I also remember eating wonderful Grapefruits and oranges grown in the area surrounding San Antonio.


    thanks,
    Orangetom

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Texas,coastal bend area
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    Interesting!
    I have lived here 62 years, 35 miles from Corpus and have never heard Texican used much until about 9 years ago, Have always heard the folks call themselves Tejanos.(Texans of Mexican decent)
    Also, Here is the list of those on the field at San Jacinto, and those in the reserve force at Harrisburg http://www.sanjacinto-museum.org/Library/Veteran_Bios/. There were more than just people from Tennessee,and Kentucky. Example: Thomas O'Connor came straight to Texas from Ireland, was a nephew of James Power,and settled in the Power and Hewetson colony in 1834. I know quite a few of his decendants we all still live in Victoria and Refugio counties. Also Daniel O'Driscoll (ancestor on my dads side) came direct from Ireland to Texas, and George Webb ( my moms side) who came to Texas from La. but originally from NE, New York State. Thats just 3 that I actually have knowledge of, so I'm pretty sure they were all NOT from just 2 states. We still live on the ranch( added quite a bit since then) that was started by Daniel O'Driscoll , as do the O'Connors on land Thomas aquired.

    And OT, you can get large steaks or steaks served family style in many places throughout Texas, as well as many other states. We prefer to go to the local meat market and have steaks cut the way we want them,cooking them at home for family and friends rather than going to a cafe or steakhouse.
    Last edited by jnr0104; 02-13-2017 at 08:21 AM.

  10. #10

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    Yeah, unless you grow your own fruits and veggies, like I do, most of our fruits and veggies at the grocery stores are from the Texas Valley Southern border. It's better fruits and veggies than anything California can grow and even the citrus that is transported from Fla. Valley fruits and veggies have a much better and richer flavor. Mexicans KNOW how to grown good plant foods!

    German and Chechz are very prominent around here too. My area acknowledges Chechz every year as a major holiday and we celebrate it with a Kolache fest every year, the second weekend ( Saturday ) in Sept. Food, dancing in the streets, live music, games, tractor pulls and a lot of Chechz vendors up and down all the streets in down town. Shortly after, there is the trail rides, hay rides and then the live stock show and rodeo as well as the County Fair. The Kolache fest kicks off the Fall activities for the remainder of the year until Jan. 1st and it's constant.

    Quote Originally Posted by orangetom1999 View Post
    Camouflaged,

    Thanks for this update.





    Was thinking after posting ...that this would happen mostly in local restaurants...verses the franchises so popular today. That is fine with me. I like supporting local restaurants and businesses..prefer to so do when I can. That is a good price for it too Camouflaged...and it sounds great too...smelling it in my mind!!

    Also thanks for the update on Texicans. I will remember that.



    My parents traveled to Texas and lived out of their RV for two years out of the Air Force base at San Angelo. Goodfellows as I recall the name. They liked that area. Makes me wonder if they revisited just such an local restaurant for steaks. I would take care of their home, grass etc, etc. here and forward their mail to them while they were out on the road. I was glad to do this for them in their retirement.

    I was also a bit surprised to learn that there is a significant German presence in Texas...old established German Communities who still speak German. My mother is educated in the olde High German..HochDeutsch I think it is called .. ..and would visit some of them and teach this High German. New Braunfels was the area as I recall my mother saying.

    I also remember eating wonderful Grapefruits and oranges grown in the area surrounding San Antonio.


    thanks,
    Orangetom
    Remember what Einstein said:
    “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

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