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Thread: diesel steel tank for water...

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Texas
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    For potable water you might be able to find a water bladder you can use inside the tank, or possibly make your own with a HDPE pond liner, but that will likely make the cost more than just buying poly water tanks from a farm supply store.
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    People are not shooting you a line when they say diesel is nasty stuff! It has gotten into the pores of the metal and you will NEVER get it out, short of heating the whole thing to about 500 degrees.

    Even trying to use it for a root cellar, you would ALWAYS have the smell and it would most likely penetrate anything you stored in it. Besides that do you really want to take a torch to a FUEL tank (BOOOOOOM).

    I would not even consider messing with it, even if they were giving it away.

    Stay clear, save yourself a bunch of work and money for nothing.

  3. #13
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    Jan 2011
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    Northern Idaho
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    It'd probably make a great tank to sink in the ground. I bet you could get about 5000 gallons of diesel or heating oil stored in it.

  4. #14
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    Jan 2009
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    http://www.ruralking.com/catalogsear...=ace+roto+tank

    im thinnking of getting one of these big dudes. putting it in a hole fillng it with water and pressureising it. and concreting around it. then when the concrete is dry syphon the water out. wala... instant small bunker for 3 people.

    well.... there is more to it than that. but shelter part mosty finished.
    Last edited by driftz240; 11-15-2016 at 06:39 AM.

  5. #15
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    Jan 2011
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    Northern Idaho
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    Wouldn't plywood and plank forms be cheaper than wasting a water tank, and allow for better customization?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    NorthCentral WA. (Highlands)
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    I've thought about bunkers for years. Looked into tons of options. There's no beating finding a used Xerxes fiberglass tank and sinking it into the ground. you don't need concrete, you don't need to make doors, already has access ports, won't leak and will last forever. Unfortunately all the used ones seem to always be on the east coast.... Assuming this tank is in good shape it'll end up buried into a hillside with the front wall exposed and a door put into it. I'll need to vent it but that's about it. I know that the diesel fuel odor is the variable, no idea how bad it'll be after washing, no idea how long it'll last (with the tank opened up). might be a few months, hell might be a few years but I'm in no hurry. If it never goes away I'd still have a fairly cozy place to store stuff where it'll never freeze without the need for external heat (I'm thinking paints, glues, tools, etc) crap that always gets messed up come winter if i don't remember to take it out of the shed and bring it into a heated place. I could barely buy the materials to build a shed for $500. Definetely not one 17' long so from a cost standpoint as long as it serves some purpose....any purpose really.... it's worth the $500. moving it here will cost me nothing as my friend will help with the trailer and it's pretty close to my place. Burying it will cost the price of diesel for the backhoe and my time. I just hope it's not all rusted out and useless when i see it.
    2nd Law: In a closed system, the entropy of the system will either remain constant or increase

  7. #17
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    Dec 2008
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    Texas
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    You might be able to seal the inside with some sort of epoxy or other coating but again you're adding $$

    I've been wanting to buy a 20' long 10' diameter culvert pipe to turn into a fallout shelter/bunker, last time I checked they ran $100 a foot delivered, so $2k for what I want, then weld on two steel end caps and cut in some access holes and ventilation pipes and you could have a very nice shelter for under $5k

    Something like this http://www.atlassurvivalshelters.com...bc/corrugated/
    Last edited by Tdale; 11-15-2016 at 11:36 AM.
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

  8. #18
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    Jan 2009
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    yes. mainly because of leakage . the plastic tank inside would be a liner. and in theory you will only stay a few horrible days in the shelter. i can live a week in a ditch. im sure i could live in a plastic tank a week. sure its no luxury bomb shelter but with some sort of filtration setup you would live. stock it with water, a kiddy bag toilet and a bit of mres. a few touch lights. and a egg crate mattres and sleeping bags... bam, shelter on the cheap. and less work.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    NorthCentral WA. (Highlands)
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    well, i went, I saw, I bought and I got the darn thing home with lots of help and close calls. It's a HEAVY sucker. Fairly certain it's some where between 1/8" and 1/4" thick steel. Solid enough to balance it's entire weight teetering on one point and not crease ir even put a dent in it. Just wish it was 8' instead of 6' diameter but I'll make it work for something. I've decided to begin by cutting a door into the end and seeing what the inside looks/feels like as far as condition but also size. I can then clean it out easy and weld in a frame and door that swings in. After that it's mostly a matter of deciding if it's gonna be a small root cellar with the end sticking out of a hill or a small bunker with a manhole cut into the top. If i go the bunker route I have a perfect spot on my property where I've been wanting to put a tiny cabin. This will go underground first then the cabin will get built over it. The side door will function as a secret emergency exit should the top manhole get blocked by something. Gonna be a fun project either way.
    2nd Law: In a closed system, the entropy of the system will either remain constant or increase

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