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Thread: Bringing water home / Moving water

  1. #31
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    Sep 2016
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    About "moving water", I am aware that the last post on that thread has been posted last month, but not being sure whether or not this has been treated in another thread, I have to install a new water-system, including fresh water tank and pipes. A friend of mine suggested PEX tubing PEX Tubing Potable Water for drinking water that is safe for young children. Apparently, reviews are very positive. Would be interested if anybody has experience with this tubing or any other, especially in terms of drinking water.
    Thank you

  2. #32
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    Feb 2009
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    mustangs, pack saddle and igglo coolers? see movie Unbranded.

  3. #33
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    here in North Dakota pex is recommended for replacing inground pipes from wells to house,, nuf said

  4. #34
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    Mar 2007
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    I have 55 gallon poly drums, a truck, and a 12v water pump. Transporting water on foot is a last ditch measure. It takes so much time, effort and energy that you have to ask if it is worth it. If this were to be for a fixed position BOL I would insist on a creek for some small scale hydro electricity for an electric water pump and would also have a ram pump for backup. For mobile bug out or bug in I have the truck/drum/pump setup. When at all possible make the water come to you. Aquaducts were one of the worlds first public utilities for good reason, the cost vs benefit ratio is huge.
    In a crazy world, it's the crazy man who can get by - and it's about to get cray-cray up in here.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Militant_Medic View Post
    This question will only apply to those of us without a well / creek / rainbarrel system / etc.

    When you run out of water at home and have to go get some how will you bring it home? Anyone who has ever tried to carry a 5 gallon bucket of water over any significant distance knows the experience sucks. So looking for solutions.

    Saw a "feel good" add on facebook for the hippo-roller- a 24 gallon barrel with a handle that lets you go out and bring water home in an easy way. Thought- "Thats a good idea. I wonder if I can buy one?". http://www.hipporoller.org/

    The answer is yes- BUT- they are manufactured in South Africa and cost $125 (OK) with $175 shipping (CHOKE).

    Similar items are available closer to home but are designed to be be filled with water not to transport it but to make a heavy roller to smash your lawn bumps down. Do you think it would be durable enough to roll for long distances over rocks, etc? http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...FQoNaQodf1YPhw

    Anyway- other ideas? If you needed to go get water a fair distance away and bring it home WITHOUT A CAR/TRUCK how would you do it?
    Before I suggest anything, what is "Significant Distance"?

    1 - 2 miles, You should dig another well, employ a rain catchment system and a cistern. And start flushing your toilets using filtered grey water. In other words employ extreme water conservation procedures. If all of that is impossible, perhaps moving to a more survivable location?

    50 - 200 feet. Use garden hoses to siphon the water.

    Anything in between, Try a sturdy wagon and use totes or bladders for the water (they are cheaper) and hitch a couple cows to your wagon and off you go. Cows aren't as glamorous as horses, but they get the job done, and they can pull far more. Pick animals for your land that have multiple purposes.
    "...government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." R. Reagan

  6. #36
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    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruss01 View Post
    I have 55 gallon poly drums, a truck, and a 12v water pump. Transporting water on foot is a last ditch measure. It takes so much time, effort and energy that you have to ask if it is worth it. If this were to be for a fixed position BOL I would insist on a creek for some small scale hydro electricity for an electric water pump and would also have a ram pump for backup. For mobile bug out or bug in I have the truck/drum/pump setup. When at all possible make the water come to you. Aquaducts were one of the worlds first public utilities for good reason, the cost vs benefit ratio is huge.
    The sumerian built canals. Roman's aquaducts.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by GR82BPREPD View Post
    Before I suggest anything, what is "Significant Distance"?

    1 - 2 miles, You should dig another well, employ a rain catchment system and a cistern. And start flushing your toilets using filtered grey water. In other words employ extreme water conservation procedures. If all of that is impossible, perhaps moving to a more survivable location?

    50 - 200 feet. Use garden hoses to siphon the water.

    Anything in between, Try a sturdy wagon and use totes or bladders for the water (they are cheaper) and hitch a couple cows to your wagon and off you go. Cows aren't as glamorous as horses, but they get the job done, and they can pull far more. Pick animals for your land that have multiple purposes.
    Just calling out a small technicality. In order for siphoning to work, the water-out has to be lower than the water-in. This means that the stream/lake/pond you are siphoning from will have to be higher than the destination. This kind of circumstance would be fairly rare. The reason is that water runs down hill, naturally, and settles in the low places. People don't live in those low places because they are where the water collects (flooding). You could work around this by digging a deep hole and put the water-out end of the hose way down in the hole, lower than the water in the lake. You could then siphon water out of that lake into the hole. The issue here is that usually the lake will be on the same level with the water table in the area. And if you dig a hole below the water table, what you have (generally speaking) is a well, no siphon required.

    Bottom line, you can't siphon uphill - for that, you need a pump. Pumps can be powered by fueled engines, wind, solar or by hand.

    The radical water conservation is a feasible practice, it's something I do when boondocking in my travel trailer. I start out with 30 gallons of fresh water I fill the onboard tank with just before arriving at where I'll be camping. I use this water exclusively for sanitation. My remaining water needs (drinking/cooking) I have water jugs that I fill every couple of days. I fill these from a tap in a nearby building (100-150 yards) and just refill/tote one or two jugs every time I go up to that building. For this scenario, it gets me by for the 3 weeks. It would get old fast if I had to do laundry and flush toilets with toted water, I can assure you.
    In a crazy world, it's the crazy man who can get by - and it's about to get cray-cray up in here.

  8. #38
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruss01 View Post
    Bottom line, you can't siphon uphill - for that, you need a pump. Pumps can be powered by fueled engines, wind, solar or by hand.
    .
    Don't forget you can power a water ram pump with the very water you're pumping

    A water ram needs no engine, wind, sun or other power source. All that is needed is a little head pressure

    NUTS!!!!

  9. #39
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    Jun 2008
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    Water wheel.

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