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Thread: Bringing water home / Moving water

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    2,143

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    I have the mid size cart from TSC and use it every year to haul water to the garden. It'll handle 6 5 gallon buckets pretty well. 4 is easier.
    Neighbors both have spring fed ponds and are within 1/4 mile or less.
    Greater love hath no man than this, That a man lay down his life for a friend.
    John 15:13

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Canadian border state that begins with a "M"
    Posts
    679

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    Water isn't an issue here, plenty of sources and methods of moving it that don't require much (or any) human-power, but thought I'd just throw my two-cents in on not underestimating how much might be needed in a longer-term SHTF.

    Before moving offgrid we used an average of about 130 gallons per day (2 adults and 2 dogs) based on our water bill, now offgrid we got that down to about 35 gallons per day by switching to a front loading clothes washer, low flow showerheads, 1.5 GPF toilets and the "if it's yellow" rule, and generally keeping a close eye on not wasting any. We use the leftover warm water from the dog dish to water the house plants just as one dumb example, why waste it right? It's pretty much second nature for us (but it wasn't at first) and we don't think about it much now, but when guests come to visit it's obvious how much less water we use than a normal American household. Just having one extra person staying with us usually triples our normal daily usage, and that's even after reminding them to try to use it sparingly.

    We could probably get our normal 35 gallons per day usage down to 20 gallons and still maintain a reasonable first-world standard of living, but below that I think it'd come with a lot of additional stress, and a tradeoff of extra work (and time) required when we didn't have the luxury of lots of water to help wash most of life's little problems away. 1-2 gallons per person per day (per FEMA) might be a survivable minimum for a short period but I can't see living with anything less than at least 5 gallons each for any SHTF that lasted over a couple weeks, and we have an outhouse to use if needed. Just my opinion FWIW.
    Everything marked, everything 'membered. You wait, you'll see.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,258

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    wrong,,,, gorilla carts basically only good thing they would do well with is hauling veggies out of the garden,, I kept having to air up the tires,, its not worth it.. I bought the collapsible silver garden carts and they work better, ergonomically were great but again the tire issues,, solid tires are best bet..the bed of the gorilla cart has the capacity its flexible but the tires wont handle what the bed of the cart says its capable of holding..I left mine behind at a friends house,, they were more than welcome to it. I love the idea of that rolling drum it is engineered to the max,, perfect but the shipping is yeouch.. a shame we cant get a factory here in the usa. Black drums would keep bacteria and algae from getting out of hand but you can always wrap it in black tarps once it is set up.
    I do however like the poly dump..the straight sides would seem to be more stabilizing,, what we have to figger out is,, how tall are the containers and how tall are the walls of the carts.
    Some friends of mine bought those mesh walled carts for bug out carts thinking that would be the thing to have.. what they don't realize its the body's ability to drag that thing one handed and carry a bob at same time.. we could not consume enough calories and carry the food to do so ,,energy consumed doesn pan out to energy needed to burn to do things this way..
    I mean hell I'm no nutritionist but I've had to learn to work smart and not hard long enough to know when to quit a task or chore and come up with a better way.
    Hauling water behind you is in my opinion burning up more calories that pushing water ahead of you,, I could be wrong. but those aluminum garden carts show the difference , same application I would imagine.
    . If I had the money I'd buy those South Africa drums ,, not for buggin out but for hauling from a well or something,, not for barter or trade either. Maybe in a community with mag members on premises,, when you cant use hoses.. for what ever reason these drums would do the thing,, don't have to worry about tires.
    Granted you cant haul mulch with them as you can with the gorilla cart but the design on the drums is 100 percent in my opinion perfect for that situation for which is was created for,, they are already in the shtf living conditions, Those which we can only hope to face with the determination which they have already lived through.. God Bless em.. and us too if we ever have to go through it.
    in the old days goat carts were used to haul milk to market, those sides were almost as tall or taller than the containers that the milk was stored in, to keep from tipping over the cans,, also they were stuffed with straw to keep the temps of the liquids where they needed to be and also keep the containers from shaking and knocking up against one another...
    cant do that with a gorilla cart or even the silver garden carts unless you do some tweaking with the silver ones possibly by inserting another end ,
    just an observation from using them like I said before I could be wrong.. first to admit it.
    and even those who have bought these mesh garden carts for buggin out.. pull that thing through deep snow ,, lemme know how it goes,, a pulk sled would do better
    Last edited by silvergramma; 06-14-2016 at 01:18 AM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Greer South Carolina
    Posts
    31

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    Hello All
    Your hit my button. GOATS
    "in the old days goat carts were used to haul milk to market, those sides were almost as tall or taller than the containers that the milk was stored in, to keep from tipping over the cans,, also they were stuffed with straw to keep the temps of the liquids where they needed to be and also keep the containers from shaking and knocking up against one another.."
    ===========================

    I have both Goats and horses.

    silvergramma's Avatar silvergramma

    Your comments about "Old Days" using goats to haul milk,etc are total correct.

    I am part of a resurgence of working goats movement. Pack goats
    As you referenced goats are also a light draft animal. Will pull a wagon / sled.
    Plus you get Milk(Good) meat and fiber off them plus light draft.
    There are very good reasons the were called the Poor Mans Cow.
    A good mature milking breed (Large) wether (Castrated Male)will carry 20 -30 % of his body weight in a pack. They can pull 125% of their own weight under good conditions.
    Think 20/25 pounds for your BOB on the back of a couple goats. That is 50 # plus with no weight on you. You do need to have goats in pairs, they are a heard animal but do bond well with people if raised right. Think Labrador that sticks to you like glue.
    They will feed themselves in rough country, Around home they like weeds better than grass. They are Browsers like deer. Not Lawn mowers.
    On the trail they leave very little sign of passage. Hoof prints most people will take as deer tracks, Goat Berries also look the same as deer berries.

    In the end if it gets that bad you can eat them/ cooks up like venison.

    If you want to know more about goats go to packgoatcentral.com
    I am there too
    hihobaron, Blizard,Fuzzy,Pete,Sam and the Troops in SC.


    Attachment 860

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Greer South Carolina
    Posts
    31

    Default Getting Water

    Hello All
    Getting water:
    I am situated close to natural water sources.
    But have larger demands than most preppers for water.
    Livestock 5 horses,4 goats. plus 2 people.
    Maybe more goats, another horse and ? people from across the street that have the extra goats and horse..
    If the Lake (within 1/2 mile ) blows out the dam that forms it, I am at the head end were a couple streams come in. Can bucket fill Barrels and move back to BC1 with either horse power or even goat power. Plus have enough horses that are trained to handle gunfire and shoot off of for a armed escort. Another + is we have Goat milk/ products.
    It is a neighbor hood co-op.
    There is also a couple small springs here I can clean out, put in a small dam and use a ram pump to get water up to BC1.
    We already have in place filtering and purification systems.
    So using lake/stream water is not a problem.

    Yes I can also take stock to water but in SHTF that could be risky for a while here. Prefer to keep a low profile for 30-60 days with live stock.

    Happy Trails and the Troops in South Carolina
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    2,258

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    tyvm lol, the next auction that has one,, I'll get it and post pics here,, they look relatively easy to build its just a matter of having the tools I would imagine,, just think of adding building goat carts to your survival skills repretoire

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    15

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    " I kept having to air up the tires,, it"

    i replace the tires on my carts with solid tires that do not need air

  8. #28

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    Use the blue, food grade 55 gallon barrels (440# each) with a rotary hand pump in the bed of a truck....or better yet, a 5 HP pump into a 275 gallon cage barrel....only 2200#, no problem in a 3/4 ton truck.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    1,136

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    Quote Originally Posted by ckelly78z View Post
    Use the blue, food grade 55 gallon barrels (440# each) with a rotary hand pump in the bed of a truck....or better yet, a 5 HP pump into a 275 gallon cage barrel....only 2200#, no problem in a 3/4 ton truck.
    The OP said.............
    If you needed to go get water a fair distance away and bring it home WITHOUT A CAR/TRUCK how would you do it?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Baltimore MD
    Posts
    98

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    I snagged an abandoned grocery cart from the side of the road late one night. It won't carry a lot, but it's better than trying to carry it on my back. (It also has the advantage that I can lean on it - I use a cane or walker for any extended walking.)

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