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Thread: Bringing water home / Moving water

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    NE Pennsylvania
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    27

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    Remember that carrying or transporting water weighs you down especially if on foot even in a wheel barrel or cart. This would pose a security risk as well as you cannot go off unbeaten paths. You would need to move in patrol format to increase security.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    10

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    we have two wheel barrels
    1 normal with 1 wheel, a pain to use
    And the other one is much bigger and has two wheels
    the balance is very nice and even with heavy loads it an be operated with 1 hand.
    Right now it is loaded with 160KG sand (in 4 bags) and 10 x 5KG chloride in containers
    it still is easier to move then the normal 1 wheeled one with just 25KG of panting soil
    I couldn't find a good picture, this resembles it most

    Attachment 850

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    4,066

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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredNSmilin View Post
    Hello friend and fellow Texan,

    I am here in the piney woods and was wondering if you know about any legalities about having a water catchment system in Texas.

    I remember recently a guy got into all kinds of trouble in Oregon for catching water raining down from the sky.

    Do you know if a 55 gallon barrel would be OK here in Texas, or is there some gallon limit on how much of the federal governments water you can hold for your own personal use?

    PS...in reading everyone's answers I see we all seem to love those 7 gallon stackable containers. Brilliant minds think alike.
    My place is a little south of Mt. Pleasant and is an Unincorporated area, so no building permits or land use permits, no worries with rain catchment either, the only thing you have to worry about in Unincorporated areas of Texas is if you put in a septic, it has to be inspected by a state inspector to be legal, other than that you can pretty much do as you wish without government interference.

    I have 2 wells, one I put in myself that goes 60' deep, It's good for collecting groundwater for non potable uses, and one deep well that goes down to the Carrizo Wilcox Aquifer (Good drinking water), and I also do rain catchment out there, Water is a complete non issue at the BOL. even without the wells I can collect well over 20,000 gallons a year off my cabin roof with the catchment system.

    Not sure about other states, but like you I've heard horror stories, I've very glad to live in Texas.

    Incidentally I also do rain catchment at my home in DFW (Frisco area) and there are no legal issues as long as I keep my water tanks in my backyard. I use the 275 gallon IBC tanks at my house, I only have 4 so right at 1100 gallons of storage, but if that's not enough it's probably time to bug out to east Texas anyway.
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tdale View Post
    My place is a little south of Mt. Pleasant and is an Unincorporated area, so no building permits or land use permits, no worries with rain catchment either, the only thing you have to worry about in Unincorporated areas of Texas is if you put in a septic, it has to be inspected by a state inspector to be legal, other than that you can pretty much do as you wish without government interference.

    I have 2 wells, one I put in myself that goes 60' deep, It's good for collecting groundwater for non potable uses, and one deep well that goes down to the Carrizo Wilcox Aquifer (Good drinking water), and I also do rain catchment out there, Water is a complete non issue at the BOL. even without the wells I can collect well over 20,000 gallons a year off my cabin roof with the catchment system.

    Not sure about other states, but like you I've heard horror stories, I've very glad to live in Texas.

    Incidentally I also do rain catchment at my home in DFW (Frisco area) and there are no legal issues as long as I keep my water tanks in my backyard. I use the 275 gallon IBC tanks at my house, I only have 4 so right at 1100 gallons of storage, but if that's not enough it's probably time to bug out to east Texas anyway.
    Well, thank you very much.

    I figured I would keep whatever I do out of sight from the road as a good idea anyway.

    I am also out of incorporated land and don't need any permits to build on my property, so I guess a 55 gallon rain barrel would be just fine for starters. I am going to set up a medicinal herb garden and want to ensure I have plenty of water just in case an unusual drought happens.

    The wife is out of town for a week, so this might be the best time to install a rain barrel and catchment system.

    Experience has taught me it is better to get forgiveness than permission.

    I have to head into Tyler tomorrow, so why not.

    Oh, one question. Do you know of a good way to patch a hole in the plastic tank if one happens to "appear" there? I was thinking about using those emergency patches for air mattresses and then spray that instaseal over it. Like a moron, I bought four cans of it once when I lived in Nebraska, thinking it was a good deal....dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb.
    Last edited by RetiredNSmilin; 05-19-2016 at 06:13 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    28

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    Quote Originally Posted by WTB Free View Post
    we have two wheel barrels
    1 normal with 1 wheel, a pain to use
    And the other one is much bigger and has two wheels
    the balance is very nice and even with heavy loads it an be operated with 1 hand.
    Right now it is loaded with 160KG sand (in 4 bags) and 10 x 5KG chloride in containers
    it still is easier to move then the normal 1 wheeled one with just 25KG of panting soil
    I couldn't find a good picture, this resembles it most

    Attachment 850
    I first discovered those when I lived in Elko, Nevada. You are so right. It is amazing how much weight they can carry easily.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    28

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    Just wondering. Has anyone actually weighed a full seven gallon jug yet?

    If not, I will do it right now in that I always have one full here in the house "just in case".

    be back soon.

    OK...Forty eight (4 pounds with six gallons of tap water in it. I never fill it all the way up. 8 pounds per gallon. but that is pretty much already known info.
    Now I feel kinda silly.
    Last edited by RetiredNSmilin; 05-19-2016 at 06:23 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    NJ (anti gun I know, I live it)
    Posts
    646

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    Quote Originally Posted by Militant_Medic View Post
    I have a bunch of the blue 7 gallon containers. Maybe a garden cart like this would work to move them about?

    http://www.amazon.com/Gotobuy-Wagon-...680524&sr=1-17
    I bought the gorilla cart from lowes. Holds up to 1200lbs, has dump feature and has inflatable tires. I use it to move lots of fire wood, stone, dirt etc. Have had it three years and love it. The handle allows you to hook up to 4 wheeler as well.

    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Gorilla-C...866D/204143839
    Last edited by Ready 4 reset; 05-19-2016 at 08:13 PM.
    "Improvise, adapt & overcome"
    Clint Eastwood - Heartbreak Ridge

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Northern Idaho
    Posts
    1,276

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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredNSmilin View Post
    8 pounds per gallon. but that is pretty much already known info.
    Now I feel kinda silly.
    Yup, 8lb/gal. Gasoline clocks in at 6.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    4,066

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    Quote Originally Posted by RetiredNSmilin View Post

    Oh, one question. Do you know of a good way to patch a hole in the plastic tank if one happens to "appear" there? I was thinking about using those emergency patches for air mattresses and then spray that instaseal over it. Like a moron, I bought four cans of it once when I lived in Nebraska, thinking it was a good deal....dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb.
    is this a potable water tank? if so I'd avoid any adhesives/chemicals that could be bad for your health

    are we talking a large tank?

    If so I don't know if there is perfered method, but I'd be tempted to drill it out and place a 1/2" uniseal grommet http://www.amazon.com/UNISEAL-Flexib...ywords=uniseal in the drilled out hole....... then place a capped 1" long 1/2" PVC pipe inside the uniseal. I know that would seal the hole for sure. I've used Uniseals for bulhead fittings and never had one leak and no worries about tainting your water source.

    If the hole is low enough you could use it for a water output, if high enough as an air vent, guess it depends on the tank size and location of the hole
    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    1,190

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    We have one of these carts and I find that it is tippy. Should be wider than it is. I would not recommend it for heavy loads(though it does pull fairly easy).
    http://www.amazon.com/Gotobuy-Wagon-...680524&sr=1-17

    This one has a much wider stance which I thick is a much better choice.
    http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/pro...b?cm_vc=-10005

    Tractor Supply (or any farm/ranch store) has many different types of carts with two or four wheels.

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