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Thread: 03/2016- High volcanic activity

  1. #1
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    Default 03/2016- High volcanic activity

    Seems a lot of volcanoes have been active recently. While none of them are particularly noteworthy and while there are always volcanoes around the world in various degrees of activity I think January-March was a high activity period. Lots of volcanoes around the Ring of Fire all active at once. While I dont tend to worry about one or two volcanoes I get a little nervous when a bunch start going.

    Maybe nothing. Maybe something. Good luck to our friends in the danger zone.

    http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/erupting_volcanoes.html

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/28/us/pav...uption-alaska/

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/scienc...rdered-to-flee

    http://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm

    From one of the articles "Although the two volcanoes are separated by around 3,000 miles, they are on interconnected tectonic plates Ė sparking fears of a major seismic shift, more volcanic activity and even earthquakes and tsunamis, due to recent activity."
    When seconds count the police are only minutes away.

  2. #2
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    I'm no scientist, geologist, but I would think that itís actually the opposite that would have me concerned; a lack of eruptions. From what I understand, there is tremendous pressure below the earthís mantle (terminology?), and as long as it is able to off-vent slowly, in a controlled manner, I think weíre ok.

    Itís when there is an unusually large buildup without the ability for that pressure to escape, until the pressure becomes stronger than the crust holding it in place.
    Problem is, measuring that buildup is not an exact science, I believe.

    Joe - NY

  3. #3
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    Excursion from the mean?
    Good medicine in bad places

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidel. MD View Post
    Excursion from the mean?
    Not sure. Tried to find an average or tracking list but no luck. On this website ( http://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm ) which lists new eruptions by week you can use the archive function to see how many eruptions were occurring in past weeks. Now I noticed some eruptions stay on the list as "new" for more than one week and I'm not sure why. I guess I'm trying to say I don't know the methodology.

    But if you add up the "new" eruptions for a given period you can at least compare time periods. So...

    The number of new eruptions during the first 13 weeks of each of the following years are as follows.
    2016 - 62
    2015 - 85
    2014 - 61
    2013 - 90

    So maybe this year is no worse (or perhaps a little better) than past years. So...

    Never mind. Carry on.
    When seconds count the police are only minutes away.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Militant_Medic View Post
    Not sure. Tried to find an average or tracking list but no luck. On this website ( http://volcano.si.edu/reports_weekly.cfm ) which lists new eruptions by week you can use the archive function to see how many eruptions were occurring in past weeks. Now I noticed some eruptions stay on the list as "new" for more than one week and I'm not sure why. I guess I'm trying to say I don't know the methodology.

    But if you add up the "new" eruptions for a given period you can at least compare time periods. So...

    The number of new eruptions during the first 13 weeks of each of the following years are as follows.
    2016 - 62
    2015 - 85
    2014 - 61
    2013 - 90

    So maybe this year is no worse (or perhaps a little better) than past years. So...

    Never mind. Carry on.
    Just manipulate the data to fit what you want.
    Isn't that what they did before not too many years back?

  6. #6
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    try a look see at( global disaster watch.com)

  7. #7
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    I don't trust published data, talked to some folks who worked with NOAA, say they do repress data. Gov gets to see but the people dont.

  8. #8

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    To me, it seems lf you don't live in the neighborhood of an active volcano, your life is not going to be impacted. I live relatively close to Mt. St Helens and even closer in 1980. Besides a little ash, nothing changed.

    The ones that have me concerned are the super volcanoes. When I was studying Geology, we would read about the super volcanoes and their potential for destruction. Big explosions, MASSIVE amounts of ash. Global scale disaster. Until very recently, Yellowstone Valley was excluded from the list of super volcanoes. There have been very few papers written about these volcanoes and they dot the earth. They know the volcanoes erupt every 400-600K years, and they know where most of the hot spots are, but there is so much more they don't know of this class of volcano than they do.

    I get concerned about these volcanoes, because we don't know enough about them to assess risk. Nobody lives very close to Mt st Helens, but they live very close to Mt Rainier, Baker, Adams, the Three Sisters, which all show signs of being active. But in the case of the last 6, we know what to look for, when they are going to erupt. Not so with the super volcanoes. Maybe when I go back for my PhD, I will study them.
    "You can't get rich in politics, unless you are a crook." H.S.Truman

  9. #9
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    i hear the lakebed at yellowstone has been riseing for some time.
    oh iv'e read that global volcanic activity always picks up just before
    a iceage. it has to do with the suns heat output slowing down.
    let us remember about all the volcanoes beneath the oceans surface as well.

  10. #10

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    The lakebed at Yellowstone has been rising, but it also falls. It is almost like the caldera is breathing
    I read a couple papers on Yellowstone about the structure of the magma beneath the caldera. There are crystals forming in magma, which has people interested. Crystal formation is usually associated with cooling, but in this case the magma chamber is not showing any signs of cooling.

    In the previous eruptions of that hotspot, they have found crystalline structures in the ash and ejecta. So they are trying to figure out what significance, if any crystal formation has on a potential eruption.

    Usually it is dissolved gas and the size of the magma chamber below a volcano, that drives eruptions, and no change in gas emissions have been reported at Yellowstone. Last year they did discover the magma chamber below Yellowstone is much larger than they had originally thought. I keep reading the papers, and my conclusion is they are saying a lot about what they don't know, but they are discovering more and more all the time.
    "You can't get rich in politics, unless you are a crook." H.S.Truman

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