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Thread: Firewood?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    I clean my stove pipe every May.
    Then I put a screen over the top of my pipe so red wasp, dirtdobbers, or a bird happens to get in the pipe.
    It has a raincap, but still bugs or birds could get in.

    The further away an elbow or pipe is from the stove, you can expect ash/soot to collect there.
    I have a 90 coming off the back of the WonderWood, then another 90, then straight out the wall with insulated pipe running thru a metal boot, then another 90 going up the side of the house. Then I put 2 brackets to hold the thin pipe.
    That 90 on the outside is where I get the most collected ash because it's cooled down by that time, and stuff falls back down the vertical pipe back to the elbow. I use the thin wall cheaper stuff on the outside and replace every 5 years or so, or as needed. And I don't use those elbows that can be twisted to make fit, those tend to leak and are not as stout as a solid elbow.
    I'll take down the vertical pipe, and tap on it with a rubber hammer, then scrap out the inside with a 2x2 with an old wire brush duct taped to the end. Same with the horizontal pipe, but it don't collect much since the heat is much higher and burns off most of the creosote.

    That's lots of wood you got worked up.
    I look at wood like ammo, can't ever have enough..but room for it is always an issue.
    I'm looking to buy one of those cheap metal carports for a new wood shed.

    If gas ran out, I have crosscut and bucksaws, mauls, and axes.
    Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Mountains & Lakes of the extreme NorthEast
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    900 SF semi insulated upstairs, with a wood/coal stove in an uninsulated basement. About 7 chords/year. We don't stock much wood, but have next seasons stacked by mid summer. Have 2-3 years of coal stocked, that pile will last for ever and is for "just in case".

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Oceana County, MI
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    I can't believe we are this far into spring and we're still burning wood. We usually don't have to burn too much this time of year and we thought we were done two weeks ago. Unfortunately, we have a cold spell that started Friday night and won't go away.
    I am not an armchair warrior, I just act like one.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Long Island, NY
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    3,684

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    Quote Originally Posted by Winni View Post
    900 SF semi insulated upstairs, with a wood/coal stove in an uninsulated basement. About 7 chords/year. We don't stock much wood, but have next seasons stacked by mid summer. Have 2-3 years of coal stocked, that pile will last for ever and is for "just in case".
    How do you store all that coal?

    Joe - NY

  5. #25
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    Jan 2010
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    Mountains & Lakes of the extreme NorthEast
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    Under tarps in the back yard. It is a real... challenge, if it gets wet, then freezes together during the winter.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    8

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    It was definitely a mild winter. I try to keep a year's supply ready to go, and a year's supply drying. I have a Hearthstone Heritage stove, and since it's an EPA stove, the wood has to be <20% moisture. For me, that means cut, split, stacked for a year.

    I love that it's so efficient: there is no smoke coming out the chimney when it's up to temp. , as it burns it all, but the need to dry it a year is a PITA.

    As well, I only clean the stovepipe/chimney once every 2 years. Since it burns so cleanly, I quit doing it every year, as I only got about a cup of fine, dry powder out of it.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    181

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    I heat 2,525 sf total, single level house (1850 sf) and garage (675 sf) with a Country Comfort wood burning furnace located in the garage. I burn mostly oak and juniper/cedar and am burning 3 to 3.5 cords from October through April each year. I think a three year supply would be a great place to start and then expand that each year if you are in a position to do so. Myself, I hope to get up to a full two year supply during this cutting season, anything beyond that would be great as I only have about one cord on hand right now, not including some pine and aspen for the fire pit in my yard.

    And as I look outside this evening, it is snowing pretty good right now!
    Last edited by Lone Rock; 04-25-2016 at 06:38 PM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    40

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    I fully agree with the 3 year supply. Something told me to get as much fire wood in as I could. Don't know why, just one of those little voices. I worked on it all winter and finally build a new, and larger, wood shed. I still feel like I need to get in some more wood, and I will be doing that as soon as the required jobs of spring are over.

    Here in Georgia I do not burn all that much wood each year but I still feel I need to get some more in.

    Perhaps I am crazy-----but why not it is fun.

  9. #29

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    Despite having an ordinary fireplace and a free-standing wood burner we haven't burned any wood for 15 years, but do keep a couple cords on hand for emergencies (100% oak). The problem is that even after removing the bark and keeping the wood covered from direct rainfall and snow, it becomes a hotel for unwanted guests. With traps and a pellet rifle I can keep the vermin from making nests, but powder post beetles start showing up in the oak by the 3rd year. I usually sell after the 4th year and replenish with fresh cut.

    Have been doing a lot of research on the benefits of rocket stoves and am about ready to build a free-standing model for emergency backup which would replace our free-standing wood burner. Our 1700sqft 2-story Michigan house is very well insulated and could be heated with as little as 1/10th the wood required for the current backup wood burner, making indoor storage of a least a couple year's worth of clean, dry oak, a real possibility. Free skid wood (and a skill saw) is all that's needed to heat the average home using a rocket stove.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Arkansas
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    560

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trapper View Post
    I guess I better back up and state that I cut my wood 14 to 16 inches long, which would not make a full rick or full cord.
    Cord of wood would be 4x4x8. Or a rick would be 4x8 cut 24'' long.
    So really, I'm burning less than what I stated, due to length.
    I cut mine that short because it's much easier for me to handle, easier to split.
    There is no standard measurement for a rick, there is only what people in certain areas are accustomed to. They don't even like face cord.
    A full cord is 4x4x8
    There are 3 face cords to a full cord here.
    A face cord is 16" x 4 x 8 or 1/3 of a full cord
    A rick varies from 14in to 20 in making it hard to know what you get from different people

    Everybody here sells by "the pickup load" or by the "rick". Neither of which are legal measurements in Arkansas, and yes, it's regulated, even though everyone does it.
    http://plantboard.arkansas.gov/Stand...20Firewood.pdf

    From: ARKANSAS BUREAU OF STANDARDS
    Firewood is sold by a measurement called a "cord" or fractions of the "cord". A seller may not use terms such as "truck load", "face cord", "rick" or "pile".

    I cut my own now, go through about a 1 full and 1 face cord per year, oak, black oak, and hickory here in the Ozarks of Arkansas.
    I have in the past bought both full and face cords.

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