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Thread: candle making

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    Dang I want to jump in with the beekeeping thing. Now I'm envious.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  2. #12

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    Its worth it. It can get expensive if you dont build your own hives but my Uncle was a major bee keeper, now retired. He's 95 and cant get around that well so he gave me his best hives. I have 9 tripple stacked hives.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  3. #13
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    Dec 1969
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    I just want to play with a few. My prob that may not be a prob is Africanized bees. Also, growing up,I was always warned of Spanish Bees that were supposed to be more hostile than I don't know, maybe typical American wild Bees? Now Part of the experiment with Africanized Bees is that they are better at defending their hives, and maybe hardier. Anyway, I guess I'd start off with a European Queen and hope for the best. This would be at the ranch so kind of on it's own. Not where I can tend it daily. Is this even worth a try?
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  4. #14

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    I've had my hives 8 years and before that, my Uncle was heavy into it for decades. He nor I have had any issues with integration of foreign bees. I started with 2 queens and a couple hundred workers from my Uncles hives and it grew from there. I lost a few the first year but the loss was minimal. By my second season I was harvesting honey enough to share with other family members and a couple of close friends.

    Another subject.. Have you thought about raising worms? I started that little endeavor about three years ago and let me tell you, it's wonderful for making good healthy compost, and just last year I started raising lady bugs. You can't beat them for keeping diseases and pests from destroying all your hard work. Being 100% organic, I've come to rely on nature to help me protect my garden and investments.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Lake LBJ, Texas
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    6,659

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    Quote Originally Posted by Camouflaged View Post
    I've had my hives 8 years and before that, my Uncle was heavy into it for decades. He nor I have had any issues with integration of foreign bees. I started with 2 queens and a couple hundred workers from my Uncles hives and it grew from there. I lost a few the first year but the loss was minimal. By my second season I was harvesting honey enough to share with other family members and a couple of close friends.

    Another subject.. Have you thought about raising worms? I started that little endeavor about three years ago and let me tell you, it's wonderful for making good healthy compost, and just last year I started raising lady bugs. You can't beat them for keeping diseases and pests from destroying all your hard work. Being 100% organic, I've come to rely on nature to help me protect my garden and investments.
    I tried worms the first year at the lake and they froze Had a farm when I was a kid many years ago. I'll do it again when I get grand kids to fish.

    I can't say that I've had either earthworm or ladybug honey.
    Once on safari in deepest darkest Afganistan we ran out of Gin, and were compelled to survive on food and water for several days.


    I typically carry a flask of vodka for snakebites. I also carry a small snake.- W. C. Fields

  6. #16

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    LOL. hummm, must remember to try some ladybug honey if I can squeeze enough of them to make it worth my while. Yuck!

    I don't keep worms in above ground buckets. My worm beds are inground under the rabbit hutches. They burrow deep during winter and the rabbit droppings keep the ground beneath, warm even when it freezes and being they are covered by the hutches, no snow accumulates over them. In the Spring they come up to a few inches below surface. I pull the castings out and start them a fresh bed to devour.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  7. #17
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    Jan 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    Wouldn't they be too soft if you just use fat ?
    It would be softer than paraffin wax, but tallow is what the pioneers used to make candles. Not too many of them had paraffin wax back then. What you have to do is render the fat down into liquid form, (the solid material left is what we used to call cracklins...made some great cornbread), pour the liquid off the dip a piece of string into the liquid fat, let is solidify, and repeat until you achieve the thickness/size you want. Length is determined by the depth of the container you pour the liquid fat into and the length of string. Can do the same with beeswax.

  8. #18

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    The thing about animal fat, (tallow) is that it emmits a lot of black smoke. Bee and paraphin does too but not near as bad.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    422

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    i used to raise bees but not anymore a few years after i quit i was stung by a wasp in the head
    went into anaphalactic shock and a 10.5K hospital bill did'nthelp either so needless to say i'm kinda skittish about
    things that sting. carry my epipen everywhere now in sting season.

  10. #20
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    Jan 2009
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    I've had "run-ins" with those big red wasps...(the one with black wings), yellow jackets and fire ants the last three or four years. They're all a bunch of ill tempered sumbeaches. Don't possess any sense of humor at all! Nearest I can figure, the only thing has kept me from a visit the ER is, being asthmatic I use a steroid inhaler every day. I also now keep Benadryl capsules in my medicine chest...just in case. I think yellow jackets are the worst. They build their nests underground. Run across the entrance with the lawn mower and here they come....hell bent on revenge. And I'm here to tell you...the lawn mower WILL NOT out run them!

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