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Thread: Wood or Pellet Stove

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    NorthCentral WA. (Highlands)
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    I've had excellent luck installing cement board on spacers (which i made out of 1/2 copper pipe i had laying around. You make sure the board is at least 1" off your floor and you end up with convection air flow behind the cement board that carries the heat up and starts the air movement around the room. I've never needed more than one board used this way. the board gets pretty warm but the area behind the board is much much cooler due to the air circulation. You can take it a step further and add a layer of aluminum foil or any type of reflective shielding material to reflect the radiant heat as well. If it was really bad you could always add a second cement board on top of the first (again spaced 1" from it using spacers and elevated off the floor that same 1"). Since the boards are the typical 4'X8' it typically only takes one on each wall around the stove standing on end they reach all the way to the ceiling (again make sure to cut them a bit to maintain the 1" of air flow space). using those the only danger you'd have is your pipe starting a fire as it goes through the ceiling. I would definitively not cut any corners with the pipe. double wall to the chimney then Class A chimney ONLY through any floors, walls or ceilings. No other way in my book, but the install of a class A chimney is something pretty much any handy guy can do. Doing that will give you a great draft as well and reduce your creosote to boot. As long as you have a decent airtight wood stove you don't need the extra heat coming off the pipe so no benefit to a single wall pipe. In my shop I have a non-air tight wood stove and use single wall pipe as it gets a lot more heat into the room instead of going up the flue. At home I have a more modern stove and it's so efficient that there's much less heat going up the pipe and if i let it cool much more i get more creosote and less draft at lower temps.
    2nd Law: In a closed system, the entropy of the system will either remain constant or increase

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Arizona
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    181

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    I installed a wood burning furnace in my garage and love it. Even heat throughout the house and don't have to deal with the wood, ash, or smoke in the house. I can feed the fire box twice a day, morning and evening, and maintain a fire for months. I actually put a match to this thing two to four times a year. Yes, it does require electric power to run the fan, fractional hp motor, but I think that could easily be switched over to a DC motor for solar etc.

    My other choice would be on outdoor wood burning boiler.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Arizona
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    Oh, forgot to mention that as a bonus, my garage is also toasty warm when it is -20 degrees outside!

  4. #24
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    Jan 2010
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    Mountains & Lakes of the extreme NorthEast
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    Forgive my ignorance, but it gets -20 in Arizona ?

  5. #25
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    Aug 2010
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    This doesn't really apply to the OP's situation, but for the sake of someone else. given a basement my favorite form of heating is what my folks have in there homestead from the 1910's. A wood furnace in the basement using passive convection to get heat into a few areas around the house on the 1st story. then grates connecting the first and second story so the heat rises into the second story. They new have a blower to make it more efficient but when electricity is out (or when they simply don't want to hear the blower) the system works just fine heating the two story (plus basement) house with wood. Takes some big grates and ducts though.
    2nd Law: In a closed system, the entropy of the system will either remain constant or increase

  6. #26
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by icentropy View Post
    This doesn't really apply to the OP's situation, but for the sake of someone else. given a basement my favorite form of heating is what my folks have in there homestead from the 1910's. A wood furnace in the basement using passive convection to get heat into a few areas around the house on the 1st story. then grates connecting the first and second story so the heat rises into the second story. They new have a blower to make it more efficient but when electricity is out (or when they simply don't want to hear the blower) the system works just fine heating the two story (plus basement) house with wood. Takes some big grates and ducts though.
    That is exactly what I do here, and as you state, it works great. I use duct fans to push the air to encourage the convection, but it is not necessary.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Tx Hillcountry
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    1,302

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    Quote Originally Posted by Winni View Post
    Forgive my ignorance, but it gets -20 in Arizona ?
    Yes. For minutes at a time. One time was that cold overnight...
    777 FGG

  8. #28
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    Nov 2008
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    Arizona
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winni View Post
    Forgive my ignorance, but it gets -20 in Arizona ?
    Where I am at, yes, wintertime lows of zero are common, and -20 would be extreme. Average winter we get 100" of snow and in the summer we never see 100 degree temps. Elevation is ~7,000 feet and we have way more pine trees than cactus.

  9. #29
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    Jan 2010
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by GR82BPREPD View Post
    I mixed a little of the old with the new. I was an exchange student in Finnland for a couple years in High school, and they had these brick and stone stoves that kept the house warm during some pretty cold winter days.

    I built a masonry stove after the design I had seen in Finnland, with a few improvements to venting and extras for baking and cooking.

    I start a very hot fire and the stove absorbs the heat. When I am cooking, I set a smaller fire and burn it for a longer period of time. Either way the house is heated almost all day. If I am baking that day, I use the black stove and load it up, just after the fire burns down to coals.

    My philosophy on stoves: There is no school like old school.
    I couldn't agree more. A 'Russian' stove or as GR82 et al said, a masonry stove would be great. You can build them to scale depending on the room you have and you use the existing flue from the ceiling up.

    A Finnish Tulikivi Ouj soapstone fireplace is what you need. There is a dealer in Newman Lake. They'll cost you your first born, but I'm certain they'll at least outlast your children's generation if installed properly. The model I like personally, has an oven above the firebox for baking. (mdl 2450/1?)
    Last edited by airborne1092; 10-06-2015 at 12:27 PM.
    "Do or do not; There is no try." Yoda

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    North Dakota
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    2,250

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    welllllll..... (mimics Jed Clampett) here's the scenario I'd look at,, if you buy a pellet stove and shtf..are you really gonna have access to wood pellets? If you buy a wood stove,, its a given ,, even if you have to go nomad with said supplies for some reason and you have enough vehicles that will take you anywhere there are trees and downed trees.. you are good to go.. if you buy a pellet stove,, how many man hours are you gonna burn trying to convert wood to pellet just for btu outputs sake and convenience,, once you learn to chop and hop,,there should only be another step... load and lock not lock and load..I've operated two types of stoves since I moved to North Dakota.. the typical box stove ,, I call it box.. the kind you see in the corner of someone's living room with a pile of kindling not too far from it and a barrel stove,, both have ways of loading and reloading.
    Why do I say this? Because since December I have been driving over 60 miles one way to go feed my horses which have to have hay bales broken down by hand, ( the big round 1,000lb and over type) loaded into a calf sled and drug down the driveway and spaced out so everyone can have enough space between themselves so you don't have the (he's touching me syndrome goin on) .
    Why did I insert that scenario..?
    This is why.. its about calorie comsumption and energy burn out.. are you gonna have enough energy to run to town or wherever after the shtf to look around for a supplier that is still in business to make sure you have enough wood pellets after you have burned up your stash?
    I 've been driving the suburban with no heat in these God Awfull conditions layered with at least 4 layers to stay warm while driving and then get out and break down those bales..
    The time it takes to make these trips.. at least 2-3 times a week and the calories I have to burn to stay warm driving there is already taking its toll on me at the age of 59. But maybe I'm going through this to learn ya something..
    Least amount of time,, least amount of energy to get a chore done..
    It doesn't take that much time to cut a load ( not a cord) of wood to last you a week or two .. that includes splitting and stacking then hauling some inside
    I've not done the cutting and loading into a trailer but I've been out there with the guys who were ,, sitting there watching them do the work,, the weather was nice and they were friends of mine at the time..
    Plus having a fifth of liquid apple pie on hand made everyone happy and warm..
    Going back to the wood pellets,, you don't always get as many bags as you want when you arrive you have only whats left on the pallet after every other customer has picked through..
    With fallen timber you can harvest in spring and cut in winter..
    I've used Silver and black or silver and brown heavy duty tarps to cover the wood pile after we've conveyor belt style unloaded the trailer so the guys can get back to their families.
    there are small wood burners out there..i had a one burner box stove that I traded for some work done at the farm and the guy who did it needed it badly ..
    If I have rambled so be it.. but for those of us who see someone working too hard.. there is a better way..

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