Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25

Thread: Cheese storage

  1. #11

    Default

    OK that covers store-bought cheese, but what if you make your own? You have live bacteria (the good kind, we hope) making the cheese, and an intact rind around the wheel. What are the rules for that kind of storage?

    The reason I ask, is because I have several cows(Dexter), that can produce quite a lot of milk in a week's time.
    "...government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." R. Reagan

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    12

    Default

    GR82BPREPD,

    sorry for the late reply. This is what I'm learning now and I'll report back with any useful information as I aquire it. Aging cheese over the long term does require a fairly consistent temperature and humidity level, plus turning stock etc etc.

    I'm experimenting on my own and am in touch with others that are way more knowledgable than I am, and picking their brains. I'll get more info asap

    Cheesemaker

  3. #13

    Default

    Hi Cheesemaker,
    That was my understanding as well. I have a "Cheese Cave" that is around 50 deg year round. I have aged some very good Cheddar there for about a year. Everyone I have talked to, who makes cheese, is consistent in their comments.
    1) Hand crafted cheese is a living organism. Cutting into it kills the organism.
    2) As long as the environment is constant, there is no reason cheese cant age for long periods of time.
    3) You are kidding, right? My cheese doesn't last long enough to be aged beyond a year.

    I am running an experiment on a wheel of cow's milk Parmesan. I think any of the hard cheeses will age longer. Brie, Red Brick, and Blue veined cheeses definitely have to be eaten before they go bad, because they have been infused with a secondary organism. linen molds and others.
    Last edited by GR82BPREPD; 05-15-2015 at 03:19 PM.
    "...government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem." R. Reagan

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    12

    Default

    And two months later I'm back. I'm on my 2nd batch of test cheese. I asked around and was sent to this site more than once. The blogger isn't a prepper per se, but lives on a farm. Which pretty much makes her a prepper. I'll attach the link to her farmhouse cheddar recipe (which is the one I am testing and tasting as I write this) as soon as I get permission from her and our site admin. Very simple recipe and results have been very good so far. Mind you, its not a super delicate aged cheddar suitable for the folks in the hamptons, but for what I'm trying it looks like a contender. Time will tell.

    GR82BPREPD, keep me in the loop on your experiments

    Cheesemaker out

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mountains & Lakes of the extreme NorthEast
    Posts
    1,165

    Default

    This is likely a stupid question, but can you make cheese acidic? That seems to be one one of the anti botulism qualifications of canning and apparently cheese storage.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    749

    Default

    My solution is to freeze cheeses bought from the store and then long term, raise goats. Then you have to worry about rennet and other ingredients storage. I figure vegetable rennet is the most practical, as animal rennet require a year to cure. I wonder how acidic mozzarella is, since you use citric acid in it.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    12

    Default

    You can make a lemon cheddar, which would be acidic, but I haven't run a check to determine the actual level.Freezing store bought cheese would work, you will simply end up with a more crumbly cheese. I'm enjoying the experiments but I will probably end up weighing a metric ton by the time I'm finished. ha ha ha

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    749

    Default

    you can shred and then freeze to avoid the crumbles, not that it matters in the long run, I suppose

  9. #19

    Default

    Why not just dehydrate it. I have cheese in my storage that was stored 5 years ago that I'm using now. Of course, I dehydrate and then powder it in my food processor for use in soups or garnishes. I rehydrate it in a little milk instead of water. You can make great cheese bread with it too. Lots of uses.
    Remember what Einstein said:
    I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    12

    Default

    http://chickensintheroad.com/cooking...-cheese-press/

    Thats a link to a homemade press. Renee and Camo: good posts, both

    One more batch of cheese to make as a test. Next batch test 8 August, to check the waxing process. I'll post the recipe after then if all goes well

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •