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Thread: what material to store to be ready for goats and chickens?

  1. #1
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    Default what material to store to be ready for goats and chickens?

    I've got a piece of land. Its well fenced, but I live in town and the land is primarily used for recreation. My plan would be to move into the cabin there, if we had to. There are friendly neighbors that I've met from attending all the parades, 6-man football games, volunteer fire dept pancake breakfasts, etc that would hopefully trade some starter goats and chickens for silver should I need to. I know that may be next to meaningless if I don't have the skills, but I could at least try. Aside from some good how-to books, what kind of things should I stock? Water troughs, goat sheds, etc? Anybody want to share a list?

    I was thinking I could get a 20' container and put stuff like rolls of chicken wire, t-posts, etc.
    Last edited by mikkelibob; 10-23-2011 at 08:28 AM.

  2. #2
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    Why not start building it up now, Worst case scenario is you will have improved the value of the land, and it might be a good retirement place once you get tired of the city.
    Preparing so that I may live better today and post shtf.

  3. #3
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    Chicken wire and T-posts won't hold (my) goats - they jump. They also get themselves into mischief when bored.

    I'd also store feed, medicines, milking equipment, butchering equipment, etc. A how-to book that tells you what you need and don't have isn't very useful.
    Good medicine in bad places

  4. #4
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    Here's what we did......http://www.whenshtf.com/showthread.p...ight=homestead


    Goats need shelter and a water source( we use kitty litter buckets) and forage, otherwise you'll need to feed them feed and hay, so you'd need to store alot of that.......you might consider rabbits, too, but they need water and feed as well.......

  5. #5
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    So my questions are, how much land and exactly what's on the land? What grows there? Are you being realistic about what can thrive there? Notice I said thrive, that's important and different than simply placing some animals onto a place......when they thrive, they breed and reproduce and stay healthy and live........

  6. #6
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    regardless of what you decide to do with animals, you should immediately start planting edible perennials. Asparagus, ground nut, jerusalem atrichoke,comfrey for example in the vegetable arena; blueberry,gooseberry,elderberry, sea buckthrorn as examples of bushes; then of course fruit and nut trees.

    these are all going to take at least a couple of years to bear and the trees 3-5 (plant dwarf varieties) so get started now.

  7. #7
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    http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-C...9387134&sr=8-1

    Check out this book. It has a amazing amount of info in one place. Chickens are my favorite animal. With free range chickens that could eat lots of grasshoppers in the summer I figured out they could live on one 50 # sack of feed for the year in my area. I never actualy did this but I have enjoyed raising chickens for eggs and meat since my 4-H days. If you really want to learn about critters for your area get out and volunteer to help your neighbors maintain their animals. Besides you might get some free manure.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneC View Post
    So my questions are, how much land and exactly what's on the land? What grows there? Are you being realistic about what can thrive there? Notice I said thrive, that's important and different than simply placing some animals onto a place......when they thrive, they breed and reproduce and stay healthy and live........
    Its ~40 acres. Its sheep and goat country. The self proclaimed meat goat capital of the world.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikkelibob View Post
    Its ~40 acres. Its sheep and goat country. The self proclaimed meat goat capital of the world.
    So, do you mean the entire 40 acres is fenced in? Meat goat capital of the world? How are they doing it? Anyway, they'll need shelter......those cheap, flat, corregated metal posts won't hold them( goats like to rub up (along) against fencing and will push those metal posts over), welded wire won't hold them.......we use 4 x 4 wrapped fencing and wooden posts........I actually cut up( down) pine trees and make my own fence posts........

  10. #10
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    yeah, the 40 acres is well fenced. Currently the ag use is sheep grazing, the neighbor runs sheep and we get ag valuation taxes. I have been thinking about buying 8' t-posts and enough fencing material to fence out a nice big acre + garden from the sheep/goats and deer, and then improving that soil. In a pinch I've got enough mesquite, cedar, and possibly bois d'arc to make old fashioned fence posts. I once bought 50 lb of 4" nails on clearance at home depot.. but that's pretty much it aside from basic hand tools. Framing something basic would be possible.

    But I'm sure there is all kinds of stuff I should get and store. Roofing materials. Water troughs. Do milk goats need some kind of stall or milking station? Do chickens need some particular materials for inside a coop? Is there some kind of solar light thing that helps chickens lay through the year? I've read I should stock up on DE (diatomaceous earth) for goat health.

    Planting fruit trees and other perennials is a great idea. Its been such bad drought here, if I had planted a tree it would have died. Hopefully I can get something started when the drought breaks. I might be able get some pecans going. I've got stuff like mesquite and oaks (acorns), but I've gathered there before, and 40+ acres of acorns is simply not enough food to feed my family. Which makes sense, if it was, the population density of the natives would have been far far higher that it was when the white man came.

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