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Thread: My little cabin

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by shermanator View Post
    Looks great! Can you post some details on the foundation? And overall cost for materials? I'd like to make something similar (or at least try). Thanks!
    Sure thing,give me a few days to get a list together.I know I have around 4 grand in it but a lot of the materials I used were scrap salavaged from some of my jobsites,cabinets,skirting,soffit etc.I have the woodstove sitting in place,just trying to save some cash to finish running the pipe through the roof.More pics and a materials list coming.

  2. #12

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    After having several requests for more information on building this cabin here is a basic list of materials, guns and knives 002 (Small).jpgHere are the piers,36-8x16" blocks filled with concrete there are 6 of them with two 1/2" anchor bolts in each guns and knives 001 (Small).jpgAn outside corner.guns and knives 003 (Small).jpgThe stove.guns and knives 009 (Small).jpgCeiling detail.Floor 15-12' 2x10 joists,30 2x10 joist hangers,4-16' 2x10 double rim,6-4x8x3/4 t&g plywood, 6 quart tubes subfloor glue.Walls 40-92 5/8 studs.16-2x4x12',front wall studs,20-2x4x16'for plates,window framing and misc.Roof 13-2x6 16' rafters,8-4x8x7/16 osb decking,2&3/4 squares of shingles and tar paper and 7 pieces of drip edge.18-4x9 siding of choice,20-1x3 cedar trim.Inside 784 sq feet of batt insulation.24-16'1x8 cedar for ceiling.200 sq feet of tar paper and 2 1/4"x3/4 #4 hardwood flooring,18-4x8x3/8 beadboard for walls and 18-1x3 cedar trim.Add nails,windows and doors,caulk and paint to suit.And before anybody says something about the piers not being below the frost line they are sitting on solid rock and I've had nothing settle in 4 years.I know I'm leaving some things out but this should give those interested a place to start and some idea of cost in your area,hope this helps.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eastern Kentucky
    Posts
    2,681

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    Bets the hell out of the place I have access too. That's s damn nice place there.
    It is the tradition that a Kentuckian never runs. He does not have to [he] is entitled to stand his ground, and meet any life-threatening attack made upon him with a deadly weapon Gibson v KY,34SW936

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    740

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    Thank you for the additional pics and information, mdl66. Hopefully I'll find some time to start work on a cabin like this (I'm sure mine won't end up near as nice as yours) sometime this summer...

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Eastern Washington
    Posts
    47

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    That's a nice cabin - you guys did a great job.

    For the poster earlier who talked about burying shipping containers - THIS IS A VERY BAD IDEA. I'm not trying to be a bad guy here but from a structural engineering standpoint, shipping containers are designed to handle VERTICAL loads but not horizontal loads.

    They will collapse if buried. You can bury a container if you make a concrete vault for it - like they do with caskets, but anything else is asking for real trouble.

    http://www.csshippingcontainers.co.uk/wordpress/?p=386

    http://www.survivalblog.com/2007/10/...ions_on_u.html

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,205

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    Quote Originally Posted by kochevnik View Post
    That's a nice cabin - you guys did a great job.

    For the poster earlier who talked about burying shipping containers - THIS IS A VERY BAD IDEA. I'm not trying to be a bad guy here but from a structural engineering standpoint, shipping containers are designed to handle VERTICAL loads but not horizontal loads.

    They will collapse if buried. You can bury a container if you make a concrete vault for it - like they do with caskets, but anything else is asking for real trouble.

    http://www.csshippingcontainers.co.uk/wordpress/?p=386

    http://www.survivalblog.com/2007/10/...ions_on_u.html

    You are incorrect. Shipping containers are designed to be stacked FULL up to the height of at least ten high. they are used like this to warehouse stock without racks, they are used like this to shipv via ocean freight on the high seas where the motion of the ship imparts MASSIVE stress on the containers... The US govenrment even uses them for direct undergound storage... the arguement that the frame holds the weight doesnt hold up. If you have ever been inside one you would see that the "frame" is supported by the steel walls themselves.


    One of the links you supply mention a drug ring using one for a lab. We HAD that here in Milwaukee, tens years and the containers (4) all were viable, Milwaukee County Sherrif's Department took them for use as additional storage after the case was over and are still using them, and this was 20 years ago...
    Last edited by Paladin; 04-20-2009 at 03:33 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    740

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paladin View Post
    You are incorrect. Shipping containers are designed to be stacked FULL up to the height of at least ten high.
    Actually, the stress points of CONEX containers are meant to be the corners and edges. Basically it is a very solid steel frame with little to no support on the walls and ceiling. If you look at the walls and ceilings, it's nothing but a sheet of corrugated steel (16 gauge steel). You can easily flex the walls with your hands, try it. I wouldn't trust my supplies (or life) to be buried with only 16 ga. steel, that is for certain.

    They are not meant to be buried, but can indeed be buried. You'll need to rust-proof the exterior and fortify the walls and ceiling with an internal or external skeleton.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Sonoran Desert US Mexico border
    Posts
    42

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    Quote Originally Posted by kochevnik View Post
    That's a nice cabin - you guys did a great job.

    For the poster earlier who talked about burying shipping containers - THIS IS A VERY BAD IDEA. I'm not trying to be a bad guy here but from a structural engineering standpoint, shipping containers are designed to handle VERTICAL loads but not horizontal loads.

    They will collapse if buried. You can bury a container if you make a concrete vault for it - like they do with caskets, but anything else is asking for real trouble.

    http://www.csshippingcontainers.co.uk/wordpress/?p=386

    http://www.survivalblog.com/2007/10/...ions_on_u.html
    I wont say how but I know for a fact that shipping containers DO NOT COLLAPSE when burried.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    180

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    They stack them high on ships why would you think they will collapse? Nah they are golden.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seesm View Post
    They stack them high on ships why would you think they will collapse? Nah they are golden.
    They can collapse if buried, the only reason they can be stacked is because the sides carry most of the the weight. Google a picture, see those big vertical beams on the sides?

    I wouldn't say it is impossible to bury one, but I think it would be pushing your luck. Add several years of corrosion from the outside and you have a potential disaster.
    Last edited by MajorPayne; 05-09-2009 at 07:49 AM.

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