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Thread: The ultimate Alaskan rifle?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    mat-su valley alaska
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    20

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    remington 700 bdl 375 holland and holland

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    997

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    Since we're discussing rifle calibers, other than the availability, what do you all think of the 300 WSM? I assume it has enough oomph to kill anything in North America, but I don't really know how it stacks up against the 300 win mag, and the .308.

    I don't reload, so I don't really know anything more than that the case looks a LOT fatter than the .308 or the 300 win mag. Any words of wisdom for one of these?

  3. #13

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    There was no substantive reason for its introduction and may be just a fad. I would wait 100 years and if it still around like the 30.06 maybe then, assuming the 30.06 is no longer in production.
    "Free Men don't need permission to own guns"

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
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    I have the Marlin 45-70 and pick up the bigger reloads at gunshows for it. I plan to take it down to Alaska Custom Firearms to get bigger loop lever per both my sons' suggestions! I like it but also enjoy shooting Dad's 30-06 when I'm down in Kodiak.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Alaska
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    91

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    The 300 WSM is shorter and fatter than 300 Win Mag. Ballistics wise there is very little difference, near negligible.

    Edit: Oh, and add 1 more for 45-70 Guide Gun
    Last edited by Pragmatist; 02-01-2010 at 12:57 PM.

  6. #16
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    Nov 2009
    Location
    East Of Dallas
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    58

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    I got my 1895GS today, what a beauty.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Orange City,Fl.
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    39

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    When I lived in South Central I hunted with a Remington722 in .300Savage.It did the job and I took three spike forks,and a 62"bull with it,but ammo was pricey,and abit scarce.My favorite big game gun is the .340Weatherby Mag,but once again ammo is pretty pricey and not very common.One I'm looking at now is a CVA Stainless convertable that switches between .50caliber cap n ball,and a break action single shot 30.06.There are also barrel inserts available on the interwebs for break action shotty's to shoot different pistol and rifle cartridge rounds.The inserts range from 8"in to 18"in long.I had at one time a Thunder5 revolver with both cylinder sets that gave me the choice with one cylinder of .45LC,and.410,and the other cylinder allowed me to shoot .45/70Govt..It was one hell of a two hand cannon to shoot.Cylinder inserts were also available for shooting different smaller caliber rounds out of it as well.Matt

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ranger69 View Post
    remington 700 bdl 375 holland and holland
    If I were to have only one choice of caliber the 375 would be on my short list. There are two basic schools of thought. One is heavy bullets that drive deep for maximum penetration at slower velocity reducing spin rate and in turn reducing richochet. They are very reliable killers because of thier consistency and strait path through bone to vitals, usually the central nervous system. Shot placement is more difficult being a smaller target and heavy bullets have poor trajectory making them a close range weapon best suited for bear defense. The 45/70 falls into that catagory. They should be loaded with hard cast bullets that do not deform on impact and use metplate of bullet (flat portion) that will push impacted material outward. My 45/70 will make a hole about an inch and a half wide through animal and my 44 loaded similarly will make a one inch hole that will pass broadside and almost lenghtways. To load these calibers with expanding bullets for heart/lung shots is not the most effective way to use them. The other school of thought is to use high velocity that has flat trajectory making longer shoots easier and use hydraulic shock to due damage. Bullets impacting beyound the speed of sound will send a wave through the meat just like a wave is made in water damaging a larger area. This is most effective on meat with high fluid content. These calibers are more prone to richochet off bone and also prone to bullet failure.They can turn to powder impacting something hard at high velocity or close range. With this understanding when I hunt I use a 270 but at close range I would much rather have my 44 to stop a bear. The advantage of the 375 is that it has struck a very good balance between both schools of thought and for those who wish to only carry one gun would be a PROVEN, reliable choice. I love the 375 but that is not to knock other peoples choices I merely wanted to point out the why's and proper uses of calibers. Intended use should play into decision and it makes a difference whether you are hunting the or they are hunting you except with something like the 375. Other calibers will lean one direction or the other but the 375 has to be the perfect balance in my mind.
    "Free Men don't need permission to own guns"

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    East Of Dallas
    Posts
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    I think the Marlin GG is so popular because it is a gun that is so small that you can carry it easily even when you are'nt hunting, like across the handlebars of a quad, or beside you in the pickup. I agree with what you have said and my gun of choice is my .45LC Revolver @ close/need it now ranges.

  10. #20

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    ....
    "Free Men don't need permission to own guns"

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