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Thread: Basic Reloading

  1. #1

    Default Crimping???

    I'm going to bring this up again. What are the benefits, i keep seeing "New" crimp dies and such. Some swear by it, what do you guys think? Do I risk having my comonents come apart while bouncing around in the can or is it good to go without the crimp? I only ask because I have loaded a poop pot of .45 auto this year and a pretty good mountain of .300 win mag, I dont know how well it travels un-crimped in a can or am I worrying about nothing? What got me thinking was the other thread today about vacuume packing ammo and it comming apart. Yikes.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Default

    I've never had an uncrimped round come apart during moving or storage, but crimping is a good idea for any semi-auto rifle or pistol. The rapid automatic movement of the bolt can force bullets to become unseated. This won't happen in a manual bolt gun. But unless you are using the Lee Factory Crimp Die, you must use bullets with a cannelure in order to apply a roll crimp. Roll crimps are not applied to semi-auto pistols using rimless straight walled cases which index off the case neck, as in the .45 ACP, .380, 9mm, etc.. Taper crimps are applied instead, and as such do not require a cannelure. Roll crimps can be applied to revolver ammo because revolvers index off the case rim, not the neck. Some bottleneck pistol ammo also can be roll crimped using bullets with a cannelure. The Lee Factory Crimp die requires no cannelure as it applies a taper crimp, which can be adjusted from very light to very heavy. Always start with the lightest crimp required. I used to think accuracy would suffer from crimping due to case inconsistencies such as neck uniformity/concentricity, or uneven crimp pressure from round to round, which can cause variable chamber pressure. Since I had an uncrimped .308 bullet get pushed into the case in my AR, I began crimping EVERYTHING and have noticed no noticeable change in accuracy. I'm not sure what if any damage a loose, unseated bullet would cause, but I'm not that interested in finding out either..(in a handgun it would probably smoke-stack and jam, in a rifle in would feed and fire and possibly jam in the barrel, which could be disastrous if the trigger is pulled again.)
    Last edited by RL357Mag; 01-02-2009 at 10:15 PM.

  3. #3

    Default

    Good to know, thank you for the explanation.

  4. #4
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    May 2008
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    Default

    Your welcome - hope it helps.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christian for Israel View Post
    as for the question on reloading glock brass...glocks have chambers that do not fully support the case head, leading to bulging in the web of the case (the part of the body close to the head). this bulge weakens the brass and can lead to head separation as well as catastrophic failure upon firing. you may get away with loading glock brass for a while but all it takes is one head separation that directs gas down into the magazine to wreck your pistol and possibly injure you as well.
    While I agree with this quote I do however reload for my Glocks. Take the time after sizing to inspect the cases. Cases nearing the end of their life span will have a distinct ring from the sizer near the case head. This ring is the weak spot that leads to failure. Cull all brass showing defects.

    As always proceed at your on risk, but I haven't blown a Glock up yet.

  6. #6
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    Default

    to each his own. while i steer clear of glock brass i DO reload boxer primed steel wolf cases. i have some that are going on their fifteenth reloading without a crack or problem.
    "Glocks may well work everytime, but they have all the beauty and character of a black rubber doorstop." - Rice Paddy Daddy

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian for Israel View Post
    to each his own. while i steer clear of glock brass i DO reload boxer primed steel wolf cases. i have some that are going on their fifteenth reloading without a crack or problem.
    You don't do this with Rifle cases do you? If so, have you checked the condition of the inside walls of your sizing die?

  8. #8
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    Default

    nope. i always wanted a carbide x39 die. i suppose i could neck size only though, but all the steel cases i've seen in the caliber are berdan primed.
    "Glocks may well work everytime, but they have all the beauty and character of a black rubber doorstop." - Rice Paddy Daddy

  9. #9
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    May 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian for Israel View Post
    nope. i always wanted a carbide x39 die. i suppose i could neck size only though, but all the steel cases i've seen in the caliber are berdan primed.
    Does anyone make carbide bottleneck dies? I went to order a plain steel 7.62x39 die set and I was amazed at how rare they are. Lee doesn't sell a 3-die set in that caliber. Even rarer is new brass. I think Norma was the only company I found in my MidSouth Catalog that even makes it. And it's expensive.

  10. #10
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    Nov 2008
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    Default

    I seem to remember midway having some 7.62x39 brass.

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