Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: How to build a Cabin, that I can build myself??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    69

    Default How to build a Cabin, that I can build myself??

    I am a woman, as I am sure you guessed by the name. What would be the best type of shelter I could build myself or with the help of one other person (husband, god love him, is not a great carpenter.) I have built a couple of pump houses for wells. I can follow directions and know how to measure, so would it be possible to do something on my own. Maybe with my husbands help holding things? I am thinking maybe a 16x16 cabin or something. I am working on the debt free, off the grid, and out of the system as much as possible idea.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    8

    Default Foxfire

    I am sure there are more efficient resources on the web which cover cabin-building from a modern perspective, but I particularly enjoyed this topic in the book Foxfire. It details the old way of doing it (pre-electricity) with great pictures and diagrams.

    Of course, tons of other very interesting topics are covered in this same book (its actually a series but I am pretty sure the cabin building is covered in the first book). I think most everyone on this site would really enjoy this series.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    156

    Default

    depending on your budget- you may want to look at "yard barns"at lowes or HD. you can buy them in kit form, and just about anyone can put one together. They also can "build on site"
    our "cabin" in KY is actually a yard barn 12x12 and we use the loft for sleeping.
    you can insulate/decorate/finish however you'd like over time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    gues my roadtrippng is over. home in east texas where i think i will MAKE a home.
    Posts
    5,216

    Default

    a while back i took a good look at the kit barns from lowes and home depot. i personally think they would work well as long as one is insulated.

    we checked a few years ago on the medium sized texas town my mother lives in and they were considered "temporary or mobile building" thus no taxes on the structure and no permits were required to build one.

    your mileage may vary...
    Last edited by ogun; 03-22-2009 at 10:28 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3,521

    Default

    You might want to go take a look at the yard barns and Morgan storage buildings and even if not interested in buying a pre-built, you can get ideas as to the contruction and copy it. I'd start with a yard barn myself, and build from there.
    Common sense is so uncommon nowadays it ought to be reclassified as a super power

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    State of Denial
    Posts
    586

    Default

    You could always keep an eye out for a shipping container and finish it out to your specs.

    This is a cool little set-up http://www.fabprefab.net/smf/index.p...c=1129.msg7461

    This is pretty slick too: http://earthsci.org/education/fields...container.html

    more:
    http://www.fabprefab.net/smf/index.p...f97&board=14.0

    http://bldgblog.blogspot.com/2006/09...-home-kit.html
    Last edited by arkfroader; 03-22-2009 at 04:12 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    69

    Default

    Morgan seems like they have a couple of things that would work great.

    Hubby wouldn't go for a shipping container. He is a truckdriver, so he wouldn't want to come to his own trailer.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    323

    Default

    I've seen houses built using stacked 2x4s, or landscape timbers. There are several sites promoting hay bale houses and houses using backfilled tires. Use your google-foo for your choice.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NorthCen. Texas
    Posts
    108

    Default

    If you look a Morgan bldgs, be sure to check that the studs are full size 2x4s and spaced properly. Otherwise insulating and paneling or sheetrocking will be a pain!!!!!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    682

    Default

    Housewife, you might be interested in checking out cordwood masonry. One of the advantages is construction is very easy to handle without too much heavy lifting. The only challeng is the roofing portion but you'll have that issue with any type of building.

    The most "notable" advocate of cordwood masonry is Rob Roy who lives in upstate NY and built his first home with just his wife's help.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •